national history day in nevada n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
National History Day in Nevada PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
National History Day in Nevada

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 37

National History Day in Nevada - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 117 Views
  • Uploaded on

National History Day in Nevada. Rights and Responsibilities 2014. Unpacking the Theme.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'National History Day in Nevada' - anahid


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
national history day in nevada

National History Day in Nevada

Rights and Responsibilities

2014

unpacking the theme
Unpacking the Theme
  • This year’s theme, Rights and Responsibilities in History, is broad. This means you can choose a topic that allows you to explore your own interests, whether it’s science, politics, the arts, education—you name it. Inspiration can come from most any place: local history, your textbooks, or perhaps recent headlines, TV shows or even the latest Twitter feed.
  • With rights come responsibilities, whether they involve exercising rights within specified limits or ensuring the rights of others. You might find it tempting to focus mostly on rights in your project, but remember that this year’s theme also encompasses responsibilities.
slide3

Let’s think about this year’s theme. What are rights? Are responsibilities always attached to rights? Are there times when rights protect some while disenfranchising others—and is that fair? Do we have economic rights? Are civil rights upheld at the same level for everyone in the United States? What are our rights as global citizens? And what about animal rights—do humans bear responsibility for non-humans? These are just a few questions you might ask as you begin your research.

To explore a topic’s historical importance, you have to answer the question, “So what?” You must address questions about time and place, cause and effect, change over time, and impact and significance. Always try to do more than just describe what happened. Draw conclusions about how the topic affected individuals, communities, other nations and the world as a whole. This helps give your research historical context.

project options
Project Options
  • Group or individual options:
    • Exhibit
    • Documentary)
    • Website
    • Performance (must get it approved by teachers)
  • Paper (must be alone)
slide5

E

X

H

I

B

I

T

S

slide8

D

O

C

U

M

E

N

T

A

R

I

E

S

steps to success
Steps to Success

Brainstorm events, ideas, or people that spark your interest.

Narrow down your list to one or two topics relating to the theme.

Research your topics using the web and books.

Choose your final topic.

Research your final topic. Make sure to analyze the sources you are using.

Choose how you will present your topic.

brainstorm events ideas or people that spark your interest
Brainstorm events, ideas, or people that spark your interest

Think, think, and think!

Choose a time period, person, or event that you are most interested in.

Maybe it is something that you didn’t get to learn about in class?

narrow down your topics to one or two topics relating to the theme
NARROW DOWN YOUR TOPICS TO ONE OR TWO TOPICS RELATING TO THE THEME
  • After you have a few ideas that interest you....
      • think about if/how this topic relates to the theme.
research your topics
Research Your Topics
  • The first task of a historian is to find a great deal of information about the topic.
  • Do not do all of your research on the web!

Think outside the box:

    • Museums
    • State Records/ Archives
    • Photos
    • Libraries
    • Books
choose your final topic
Choose Your Final Topic

When choosing your topic, choose the topic that interests you but also has substantial amounts of resources to help you with your research.

Try to narrow down your topic but do not narrow it too far where it is difficult to find information on it.

there are many ways to find topics
What topics interest you?

Immigration, Ethnicity

Politics, Law

Labor, business

Technology, medicine

Arts, literature

Sports, Media

Civil and human rights

Women’s issues

Environment

— everything has a history!

What current events or issues concern you?

What career do you want to have as an adult?

What period of history is most intriguing for you?

There are many ways to find topics…
slide15

To explore a topic’s historical importance, you have to answer the following…

  • “So what?”
  • Time and place
  • Cause and effect,
  • Change over time, and
  • Impact
  • Significance.

Always try to do more than just describe what happened. Draw conclusions about how the topic affected individuals, communities, other nations and the world as a whole. This helps give your research historical context.

slide16

It’s historically significant.

It can be argued -- interpreted.

It’s history – happened in the past, and shows change over time.

It’s connected to Nevada.

Your History Fair Topic Question

It’s got soul! YOU CARE ABOUT IT!

It’s got sources.

It uses the NHD theme for analysis.

slide17

What changed? How and why? What was the impact? What was its significance?

Always the “big questions” of history.

A specific aspect of history to analyze.

NHD THEME

Research!!

INVEST TIME IN FINDING THE TOPIC

slide18

What changed? How and why? What was the impact? What was its significance?

Always the “big questions” of history.

A specific aspect of history to analyze.

I love TV!

NHD THEME

BROAD TOPIC

Research!!

INVEST TIME IN FINDING THE TOPIC

slide19

What changed? How and why? What was the impact? What was its significance?

Always the “big questions” of history.

A specific aspect of history to analyze.

I love TV.

Hey, I didn’t know that Chicago was once famous for its television programs. Wow!

2013 Theme is “Turning Points in History: People, Ideas, Events”

BROAD TOPIC

Research!!

Narrowed Topic

INVEST TIME IN FINDING THE TOPIC

slide20

What changed? How and why? What was the impact? What was its significance?

Always the “big questions” of history.

A specific aspect of history to analyze.

I love TV.

Hey, I didn’t know that Chicago was once famous for its television programs. Wow!

Did Chicago TV produce any turning points in history?

NHD THEME

BROAD TOPIC

Research!!

Narrowed Topic

Historical Question

INVEST TIME IN FINDING THE TOPIC

slide21

INVEST RESEARCH TIME IN FINDING THE TOPIC

What changed? How and why? What was the impact? What was its significance?

Always the “big questions” of history.

A specific aspect of history to analyze.

I love TV!

I didn’t know that Chicago was once famous for its television programs. Wow!

Did Chicago TV produce any turning points in history?

Chicago School of Television’s pioneering informal style broke down barriers between the audience and performers which represented a turning point that changed Americans’ relationship to television.

NHD THEME

BROAD TOPIC

Research!!

Narrowed Topic

Historical Question

Historical Question

Working Thesis

MAIN RESEARCH!

slide22
Once you’ve narrowed your topic, asked a historical question and done more research, you will be able to write a “working” thesis.
  • A thesis statement tells us in one or two sentences what you are going to argue for in your project. It is your answer to your historical question.
a strong thesis
A strong thesis:
  • Takes a stand -- makes a specific argument or interpretation
  • Has a narrow and specific focus
  • Based on & can be supported with evidence
  • Explains historical impact, significance, or change over time, and
  • Can be communicated in one or two sentences.
slide24

What are secondary sources?Materials that give information, make an argument or offer interpretation based on primary sources.Use secondary sources first to gather basic information on your topic - including the background and context.

slide25

ALWAYS START

  • BOOKS or ARTICLES
  • by historians on a narrow subject
  • by historians that summarize or synthesize others’ works
  • by writers summarizing historians
  • Encyclopedia & general reference books
  • Interviews with scholars, experts, museum docents, or others with second-hand knowledge
what are primary sources
What are Primary Sources?

Material made at the time - for the time, or persons who were witnesses or participants.

Primary sources are the “voices into the past” that make history come alive. They are also the historian’s EVIDENCE.

slide27
Speeches
  • Letters
  • Photographs
  • Interviews
  • Diaries
  • Posters, flyers
  • Newspapers, serials
  • Minutes or reports, government documents
also look for
Also look for…
  • Speeches
  • Interviews
  • Oral Histories
  • Letters
  • Diaries
where can you find them
Where can you find them?
  • libraries
  • archives
  • interviews
  • neighborhoods
  • organizations
  • historic sites
  • museums
  • Internet-online databases and digital collections
slide34

When you’re researching, organize what you are finding into six main areas:

    • Description: who, what, when, where
    • Historical context
    • What happened: how and why
    • Causes or contributing factors
    • What changed and why: effects and impact
    • Significance

Your notes=the information you are finding but ALSO your analysis of that information

just like historians you will need to submit an annotated bibliography with your project
Just like historians, you will need to submit an Annotated Bibliography with your project:
  • A bibliography contains citations--the detailed publication information--about every source you used.
  • An annotation is your summary of the source and explanation of how it was used in your project.

(You will attach your Annotated Bibliography to the Summary Statement Form to give to your judges.)

slide36

Annotated Bibliography

The annotation summarizes the source and explains how it was used in project.

Bibliographic Information may be either MLA or Turabian style. Be consistent.

Primary and Secondary Sources should be separated.