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VANCOUVER, CANADA SEPTEMBER 23, 2010 PowerPoint Presentation
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VANCOUVER, CANADA SEPTEMBER 23, 2010

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VANCOUVER, CANADA SEPTEMBER 23, 2010

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  1. VANCOUVER, CANADASEPTEMBER 23, 2010 INTERTANKO and TANKER SAFETY JOSEPH ANGELO DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR

  2. OVERVIEW • INTERTANKO • International regime for tanker safety • Tanker statistics • Risk management

  3. INTERTANKO INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT TANKER OWNERS • Non-profit organization • Established in 1970 • Voice of the independent tanker owners

  4. INTERTANKO MISSION Provide Leadershipto the Tanker Industry in serving the World with the SAFE, ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND AND EFFICIENT seaborne transportation of oil, gas and chemical products

  5. INTERTANKO PRIMARY GOAL Lead the CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT of the Tanker Industry’s Performance in striving to achieve the Goals of: • Zero Fatalities • Zero Pollution • Zero Detentions

  6. MEMBERSHIP MEMBERSHIP is open to independent tanker owners and operators of oil and chemical tankers (i.e. non-oil companies and non-state controlled tanker owners) who meet the membership criteria. ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIPis available to any entity with an interest in the shipping of oil and chemicals.

  7. MEMBERSHIP • 250+ Members • 3,000+ Tankers • 260+ Million DWT • Members in 40+ countries • MORE THAN 75% OF THE INDEPENDENT TANKER FLEET • 320+ Associate Members

  8. MEMBERSHIP Members/million dwt No. of tankers

  9. SECRETARIAT • 24 STAFF MEMBERS IN 4 OFFICES Oslo (12), London (10), Singapore (1) USA (1) + Brussels, Manila (consultant) • STAFF INCLUDES - Managing Director - Technical Director - Director, Regulatory Affairs - Marine and Chemical Director - General Counsel

  10. Governance Structure 15 Committees 5 Regional Panels

  11. MAIN ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES • Air emissions - Green House Gases - Exhaust Gas emissions (Annex VI & its revisions) - VOC emissions • Spill Prevention and Response Planning • Ballast Water management • Biofouling • Antifouling systems • Ship Recycling • Port Reception Facilities (adequacy & affordability) • Waste management (onboard and ashore) • Radiated Noise pollution • Cetacean strikes

  12. INTERNATIONAL REGIME • International shipping is regulated by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), a specialized agency of the United Nations • IMO’s main objective is to facilitate cooperation among governments on technical and legal matters affecting international shipping to achieve the highest level of international standards for maritime safety, maritime security and protection of the marine environment • This is accomplished through the development of international conventions, codes, and recommendations.

  13. INTERNATIONAL REGIME • Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) • Prevention of Pollution (MARPOL) • Standards for Training and Watchkeeping (STCW) • Preventing Collisions at Sea (COLREGs) • Loadlines • Oil Pollution Response (OPRC) • Ballast Water Management • Recycling of Ships

  14. SOLAS CONVENTION • Design and construction • Subdivision and stability • Machinery and electrical • Fire detection and prevention • Lifesaving • Radiocommunications • Safety of navigation • Safety Management • Security

  15. MARPOL CONVENTION Six mandatory Annexes - Oil - Chemicals - Packaged goods - Sewage - Garbage - Air emissions

  16. MARPOL CONVENTION Annex 1 - Tanker requirements • Double hulls • Damage stability • Tank size limitations • Limitations on operational discharges - From cargo tank area - From machinery spaces • Monitoring equipment • Emergency response planning

  17. Investment in New Tonnage- Move to Double Hulls • More than USD 500 billion invested since 2000 with the result that ~95% of tanker fleet* double hulled by end 2010 * over 10,000 dwt

  18. Average age tanker fleet above 10,000 dwt Years Based on LRFairplay

  19. Tanker Incidents and accidental pollution Number incidents ‘0000 ts pollution Source: INTERTANKO, based on data from LMIU, ITOPF and others

  20. Tanker incidents 2009 Worst incident 2009 may be collision/fire Formosa Brick collision in the Straits of Singapore Aug 2009 9 fatalities and Elli that broke in to two at the entrance Suez Canal. Rate is number incidentsdivided by number tankersin the segment

  21. Tanker hull & machinery incidents Number incidents Based on data from LMIU, ITOPF + others

  22. Tanker hull & machinery incidents Number incidents 2010 figures are for 110 days Based on data from LMIU, ITOPF + others

  23. Accidental oil pollution into the seaspills per tonne-miles 1970-2009 1000 ts spiltper bn tonne miles Record low 2008 and gain - record low 2009 Source: INTERTANKO/ITOPF

  24. Accidental oil pollution into the sea and tanker trade 1000 ts spilt bn tonne-miles Record low accidental pollution from tanker in 2008 and in 2009 Source: INTERTANKO/ITOPF/Fearnleys

  25. Incidents attended by ITOPF over the past 5 yearsMost oil spills come from bunkers and other shiptypes than tankers Number of incidents Source: International Tankers Owners Pollution Fund (ITOPF)

  26. Estimated total average annual U.S. Oil Spillage bbls Storage and consumption include: Non-Tank Vessels (Cargo Ships) (2%), Other vessels (5%), Gas stations and Truck stops, Residential, Aircraft, Inland EPA-Regulated facilities (77%), Coastal facilities (Non-Refining) , Inland unknown, Motor vehicles, Others Transport includes: Inland pipelines (80%), Tanker trucks (10%), Railroads (2%), Tank ships (4%), Tank barges (percentages are percentages for the period 1998-2007 for the particular segment. (Percentages in graph is the tank ships percentage of total spillage for he period). Pollution from tankers in the US have been strongly reduced both in absolute terms and as a percentage of total spillage in each period Based on data from USCG

  27. “WALK THE TALK” Proactive approach • Distillate fuels – proposed that IMO require all ships to switch from residual fuels to distillate fuels • TOTS – developed Tanker Officer Training System to augment existing mandatory requirements • Targets for GHG emissions – first to propose the IMO set Greenhouse Gas emission targets for shipping

  28. Risk Management Involves: • Identifying and understanding risks • Mitigating or eliminating risks, where possible • Avoiding unacceptable risks • Balancing risk & reward to arrive at the best decision for all involved Goals: • To protect people, the environment and property • To avoid a catastrophic incident • To prevent disruptions to commerce and trade • To improve quality of available tonnage

  29. Risk Management • IMO provides robust requirements for tanker design, construction, equipment, machinery, tank size, damage stability, operational requirements and crew training • Opportunities exist for certain navigational matters

  30. IMO Ships Routing IMO Ships’ Routing Publication • Traffic separation schemes • Deepwater routes • Areas to be avoided • Other routing measures • Two way routes (Strait of Juan de Fuca) • Directions of traffic flow • Navigation around the coast • Mandatory ship reporting • Mandatory routing systems • Mandatory no anchoring areas

  31. Concluding Remarks • INTERTANKO is a highly respected, responsible association with tanker safety as its highest priority • IMO comprehensively regulates tanker safety through mandatory requirements • Statistics clearly show a distinct improvement in tanker safety • Risk Management analysis is the best way forward to address local/regional issues or concerns

  32. THANK YOU!