introduction to philosophy n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Introduction to Philosophy PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Introduction to Philosophy

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 7

Introduction to Philosophy - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 156 Views
  • Uploaded on

Introduction to Philosophy. philosophy. Our primary concern is to do what is right and to believe what is true. Philosophy provides us with some of the intellectual/conceptual skills we need to achieve this. But these skills are difficult to acquire. reading philosophy.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Introduction to Philosophy' - amato


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
philosophy
philosophy
  • Our primary concern is to do what is right and to believe what is true.
  • Philosophy provides us with some of the intellectual/conceptual skills we need to achieve this.
  • But these skills are difficult to acquire.
reading philosophy
reading philosophy
  • Reading philosophy is not like reading other sorts of texts.
    • It is not simply a matter of memorizing facts.
    • It involves being able to understand and evaluate claims (views, positions, theories, analyses, etc.).
    • That is, it is a matter of understanding the claims philosophers are arguing for and the reasons they give for them.
philosophical lingo
philosophical lingo
  • Grasping philosophical concepts is of the utmost importance to understanding what philosophers are claiming (and why).
  • So, you should make sure to identify all terms or phrases that you do not understand.
    • Look them up in the dictionary (or better yet, in a philosophical dictionary).
    • If this fails, ask us.
doing philosophy
doing philosophy
  • Philosophy is not merely a matter of developing and defending one’s own view.
  • It requires understanding, considering, and giving fair weight to competing alternative views.
  • You will often see both of these things going on in the papers you read.
    • It is important to distinguish the philosopher’s own view from those he/she are arguing against.
doing philosophy1
doing philosophy
  • Philosophy requires that we consider the rational implications/consequences of our beliefs.
  • If you believe that x, then what does that commit you to? what follows from x?
  • Often, upon examination, we find that our beliefs lead us to unacceptable conclusions:
    • “Lying is (always) wrong”
    • “Poor people are just lazy”
    • “God is omnipotent”
doing philosophy2
doing philosophy
  • Philosophy involves evaluating arguments.
  • To give an argument for a claim is to give reasons (evidence) for that claim.
    • As this suggests, claims are not the same things as arguments.
  • What counts as good vs. poor reasons (evidence)?
    • Good: Perception/Introspection/Rational intuition/Reasoning/Empirical data/Expert opinion
    • Poor: Hearsay/Social conditioning/Popular opinion/Blind faith