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Privilege. Class Activity. AHED 701 Patricia Burris David Leaneagh Tiffany Quinze Elizabeth Simmons. Technology in the Globalization of Adult and Higher Education. but we always have been by virtue of being human.

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    1. Privilege Class Activity

    2. AHED 701 Patricia Burris David Leaneagh Tiffany Quinze Elizabeth Simmons Technology in the Globalization of Adult and Higher Education

    3. but we always have been by virtue of being human. We are potentially connected instantaneously with every other human being in the world. . .

    4. Globalization

    5. Growing interconnectedness; both a process and a theory; Roland Robertson(1987): “accelerated compression of the contemporary world and the intensification of consciousness of the world as a single entity”.

    6. Globalization • Western civilization (e.g., rule of law), scientific culture, technological progress, and industrial development . • Past to present: • Roman Empire, • Vikings, • Chinese Han Dynasty (206 BCE to 220 CE), • Crusades, • Worker guilds, • Labor movements, • Gandhi’s non-violence movement • From missionaries to on-line doctorate degrees

    7. Our objectives • We will begin with the learner • Define shared and diverse environmental factors • Discuss the politics of pedagogy • Change • Power • Stratification and polarity • Transference of power • Tangible power-resources and human capital • Intangible power-knowledge, technos, and criticality

    8. Our objectives • Dialogue and empowerment • Structures of power • Human rights- human resources • Structures of the Internet • Bridging the divide • Discussion of barriers and opportunities

    9. Who is The learner?

    10. Internet penetration (2003)

    11. WORLD INTERNET USAGE AND POPULATION STATISTICS

    12. Adult Male Illiteracy (2003)

    13. Adult Female Illiteracy (2003)

    14. The Global Learner and Gender • Indicator: Ratio of females to males in tertiary education - 1990 • Indicator: Ratio of females to males in tertiary education - 2001

    15. What is The environment?

    16. Bronfenbrenner (Simmons, 2006)

    17. Adaptation to change is human survival behavior

    18. technos

    19. Change

    20. Monkey sphere Humans interact in groups of less than 150 individuals that we can conceptualize as like ourselves

    21. Monkey sphere Humans have interacted in groups of less than 150 individuals that we can conceptualize as like ourselves Us! Them!

    22. African proverb from MBM's article on traditional African society: 'in the jungle, the argument/logic of the lion is always the most valid.' (2001, p. 484) Human empowerment vs. subjugation

    23. Poverty: Polarization of economy

    24. A summary of a United Nations’ Development Report Bauman (1999: 175–176) • consumption has multiplied by a factor of six since 1950, but one billion people cannot even satisfy their most elementary needs; • 60% of residents in developing countries have no basic social infrastructures, 33% no access to drinking water, 25% no accommodation worthy of the name and 20% no sanitary or medical services; • the average income of 120 million people is less than $1 per day; • in the world’s richest country (USA), 16.5% live in poverty, 20% of the adult population are illiterate; 13% have a life expectancy of shorter than 60 years; • the world’s three richest men have private assets greater than the combined national products of the 48 poorest countries; • the fortunes of the 15 richest men exceeds the total produce of the whole of sub-Saharan Africa; • 4% of the wealth of the world’s richest 225 men would offer the poor of the world access to elementary medical and educational amenities as well as adequate nutrition. --quoted in Jarvis(2006).

    25. Politics of power Tangible power=wealth, resources and temporally food One-way transfer of finite wealth and resources, or in the case of food and medicine, temporally finite.

    26. Politics of power Tangible power=wealth and resources

    27. Politics of power Tangible power=wealth and resources

    28. Politics of power Tangible power=wealth and resources

    29. Politics of power Tangible power=wealth and resources

    30. Politics of power Tangible power=wealth, resources and temporally food Tangible power tends to be conserved by those in ownership through downward pressure on those less powerful

    31. Politics of power Intangible power=knowledge, technos, understanding, and criticality Dialogic transfer of infinite knowledge, technos understanding, and expansion of critical thinking

    32. Politics of power Intangible power=knowledge, technos, understanding, criticality

    33. Politics of power Intangible power=knowledge, technos, understanding, criticality

    34. Politics of power Intangible power=knowledge, technos, understanding, criticality

    35. Politics of power Intangible power=knowledge, technos, understanding, criticality

    36. Politics of power Intangible power=knowledge, technos, understanding, criticality

    37. Politics of power Intangible power=knowledge, technos, understanding, criticality

    38. Barrier or opportunity to higher education? Increase in intangible power increases competition for finite tangible wealth and resources.

    39. Structures of power Shift from governmental to super-governmental corporate power Ellen Wood’s quote that “No ancient despot could have hoped to penetrate the personal lives of his subjects—their life chances, choices, preferences, opinions and relationships—in the same comprehensive and minute detail, not only in the workplace but in every corner of their lives.(Wood, 1995)”

    40. Corporate—the workforce Influences on global higher education Need for cultural understanding Need for complex informational skills and filtering Distributive empowerment requires critical thinking skills Global Higher Education Need for global marketing High skilled workers adaptive to rapid change Global supply chain management Need for creativity

    41. Democratization—individual empowerment & fulfillment of potential Influences on global higher education Need for cultural preservation and acceptance of diversity Freedom of choice and privacy Need for global human rights Distributive empowerment requires critical thinking skills Global Higher Education Expansion of conceptualization of humanity and association Highly adaptive to rapid change Global management of finite resources Need for creativity

    42. ObjectivesGlobal Learner • Rapid adaptation • Full human potential • Critical response to change • Agency • Ability to filter and focus on essential information • Openness to innovation • Openness to dialogue with diverse individuals • Preservation of cultural history and living language • Compassion for expanding association

    43. Balance of power Democracy Institutionalized Power Structures Human Development

    44. Other initiatives for human rights Your ideas?

    45. Elegance , democracy, the market, and distribution of power Structures of the Internet

    46. Impacts on Adult Education: The Web Revolution • One social force, the World Wide Web, has influenced adult education in a little over the last decade • Adoption of the World Wide Web since its inception in 1991 by the society at large has been unprecedented • In 2000–2001 school year, 90 percent of public 2-year and 89 percent of public 4-year institutions offered distance education courses (National Center for Education Statistics, 2003)