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Japanese Hiragana - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Japanese Hiragana. Pronounciation. Unlike English letters, Japanese characters do not contain only one sound per character. Most characters include a consonant and a vowel sound, with a few exception. Lets take a quick look at all the characters in the Hiragana alphabet.

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pronounciation
Pronounciation
  • Unlike English letters, Japanese characters do not contain only one sound per character. Most characters include a consonant and a vowel sound, with a few exception.
  • Lets take a quick look at all the characters in the Hiragana alphabet
the letters we ve seen to the side of the characters are called romaji
The letters we’ve seen to the side of the characters are called Romaji
  • Romaji is the English translation of Japanese characters.
  • Japanese vowel pronunciations, however, are somewhat different than ours.
for example
For Example…
  • A is always pronounced “ah” as in alter
  • I is always pronounced “ee” as in see
  • U is always pronounced “oo” as in boot
  • E is always pronounced “eh” as in egg
  • And O is always pronounced “oh” as in over
  • There are no exceptions to these rules