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Poetry Terminology Review. Lesson 17 9 th Lit.

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    1. Poetry Terminology Review Lesson 17 9th Lit

    2. ELA9RL1 (poetry) aThe student identifies and responds to the aesthetic effects of subject matter, sound devices (i.e., alliteration, onomatopoeia, rhyme scheme), figurative language (i.e., personification, metaphor, simile, hyperbole) and structure (i.e., fixed and free forms, rhymed and unrhymed, narrative and lyric) in a variety of poems.

    3. Here is a list of words. Write down the numbers of all that you think you understand. • oxymoron • couplet • assonance • consonance • personification • simile • hyperbole • onomatopoeia • metaphor • alliteration • allusion • paradox • apostrophe • symbol • internal rhyme • exact rhyme • approximate rhyme

    4. The EOCT will require you to use your knowledge of these terms to answer questions like the ones we will discuss today.

    5. oxymoron • a combination of two words that are seemingly opposites – usually an adjective-noun Examples: dark light living dead noisy silence new classic open secret successful failure virtual reality from Idylls of the Kingby Tennyson "And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true.“ What are the two examples in this phrase?

    6. couplet • a pair of rhyming lines, usually of the same length and meter I THINK that I shall never see, A poem as lovely as a tree.

    7. assonance • the repetition of vowel sounds to create internal rhyming within phrases or sentences • For example, in the phrase "Do you like blue?", the /u:/ sound ("o"/"ou"/"ue“) is repeated within the sentence and is assonant. Where is assonance in these two examples from literature? Ex: Dead in the middle of little Italy, little did we know that we riddled two middle men who didn't do diddily.“ Ex: I bomb atomically—Socrates' philosophies and hypotheses can't define how I be droppin' these mockeries.

    8. consonance • most commonly used in poetry and songsand characterized by the repetition of the same consonant two or more times in short succession Examples: #1. "pittpatter" #2. "all mammals named Sam are clammy".

    9. #1. “When the men sent children off to war, Linda knew emptiness that didn’t end anymore.” A. oxymoron B. couplet C. assonance D. consonance

    10. personification • a nonhuman subject is given human characteristics

    11. simile • comparison between two unlike ideas using “like” or “as” He walked on stage as bold as a lion.

    12. hyperbole • a deliberate exaggeration or overstatement She uses so much makeup she needs a chisel to get it off.

    13. onomatopoeia use of words that imitate sounds Ex: buzz, crash, whirr, clang, hiss, purr, squeak, boom, tinkling

    14. #2. “Splish, splash, the water fellTrickling slowly down the well.” A. personification B. simile C. hyperbole D. onomatopoeia

    15. personification • a nonhuman subject is given human characteristics

    16. simile • comparison between two unlike ideas using “like” or “as” He walked on stage as bold as a lion.

    17. metaphor • one thing spoken of as though it were something else His brain was a wall. =

    18. couplet • a pair of rhyming lines, usually of the same length and meter I THINK that I shall never see, A poem as lovely as a tree.

    19. #3. “I wandered lonely as a cloud.” (William Wordsworth) A. personification B. simile C. metaphor D. couplet

    20. alliteration • Repetition of initial consonant sounds Cherry Blossoms Adrift Pink petals passingScents above so highPainted porcelain perfectionBlossoms caress the sky

    21. paradox A Cretan says: "All Cretans are liars". How is this statement a paradox? • a statement that seems to be contradictory but that actually presents a truth

    22. metaphor • one thing spoken of as though it were something else His brain was a wall. =

    23. allusion • a reference to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art

    24. #4. He moved the tree with Herculean strength. A. alliteration B. paradox C. metaphor D. allusion

    25. paradox A Cretan says: "All Cretans are liars". How is this statement a paradox? • a statement that seems to be contradictory but that actually presents a truth

    26. personification • a nonhuman subject is given human characteristics

    27. simile • comparison between two unlike ideas using “like” or “as” He walked on stage as bold as a lion.

    28. metaphor • one thing spoken of as though it were something else His brain was a wall. =

    29. #5. “His fear was a prison, stronger than any more visible barricade.” A. paradox B. personification C. simile D. metaphor

    30. hyperbole • a deliberate exaggeration or overstatement She uses so much makeup she needs a chisel to get it off.

    31. personification • a nonhuman subject is given human characteristics

    32. apostrophe • a figure of speech in which someone absent or dead or something nonhuman is addressed as if it were alive and present and was able to reply Example of Apostrophe The Sun Rising by John Donne Busy old fool, unruly sun,Why dost thou thus,Through windows, and through curtains call on us?

    33. symbol stands for something else

    34. #6. My blood boiled as I listened to the gossip. A. hyperbole B. personification C. apostrophe D. symbol

    35. hyperbole • a deliberate exaggeration or overstatement She uses so much makeup she needs a chisel to get it off.

    36. couplet • a pair of rhyming lines, usually of the same length and meter I THINK that I shall never see, A poem as lovely as a tree.

    37. internal rhyme • rhyming words appear in the same line I bring fresh showers for the thirsting flowers.

    38. personification • a nonhuman subject is given human characteristics

    39. Exact Rhymes • Exact rhymes are the same in everything but the first sound. Exact rhymes are the most common type of rhyme and can be formed easily with common sounds in English. • pay / day / way / say / may / bay / play / pray / stay ... • me / we / be / see / tree / knee ...

    40. #7 I have a million things to do todaySo hurry up and get out of my way! A. hyperbole, couplet B. personification, couplet C. hyperbole, internal rhyme D. personification, exact rhyme

    41. simile • comparison between two unlike ideas using “like” or “as” He walked on stage as bold as a lion.

    42. personification • a nonhuman subject is given human characteristics

    43. couplet • a pair of rhyming lines, usually of the same length and meter I THINK that I shall never see, A poem as lovely as a tree.

    44. approximate rhyme • words that are similar in sound but do not rhyme exactly • examples: • send and when • sun and plum • day and made • fellow and hollow

    45. metaphor • one thing spoken of as though it were something else His brain was a wall. =

    46. #8. “And the land was a pretty womanSmiling at us, looking at her” (Ortiz) A. simile, personification B. couplet, personification C. approximate rhyme D. metaphor, personification

    47. hyperbole • a deliberate exaggeration or overstatement She uses so much makeup she needs a chisel to get it off.

    48. onomatopoeia use of words that imitate sounds Ex: buzz, crash, whirr, clang, hiss, purr, squeak, boom, tinkling

    49. oxymoron • a combination of two words that are seemingly opposites – usually an adjective-noun Examples: dark light living dead noisy silence new classic open secret successful failure virtual reality from Idylls of the Kingby Tennyson "And faith unfaithful kept him falsely true.“ What are the two examples in this phrase?

    50. paradox A Cretan says: "All Cretans are liars". How is this statement a paradox? • a statement that seems to be contradictory but that actually presents a truth