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Lessons Learned from scoring student work in math and science. Run-On Equations. Students are using run-on equations to support work. Run-on equations give “false information” and do not earn points for supporting work. Example of a run-on equation: 10 + 17 = 27 – 3 = 24

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run on equations
Run-On Equations
  • Students are using run-on equations to support work. Run-on equations give “false information” and do not earn points for supporting work.
    • Example of a run-on equation:

10 + 17 = 27 – 3 = 24

    • Remedy: Have students use only one equal sign per equation.
showing work
Showing Work
  • Examples of ways to help students earn points:
    • Have students show all mathematical decisions.
    • Encourage students to record any conversion factor that they use.
    • “Show work using words, numbers, and/or pictures” does not mean all of the ways.

-Students who write a narrative of “how” they solved a problem have added no additional information and may include a contradiction in the narrative.

showing work1
Showing Work
  • When students provide more than one answer, scorers will not choose which one is correct.
  • When students write over an answer, they are not making their answers clear enough to score.
  • Students can earn points for work that is crossed out if it is correct and supports their answer.
  • Students should cross out work, rather than erase. When students erase work, they show no evidence of strategy or procedure.
slide5

Labels

  • Missing and/or incorrect labels are a common reason students lose points.
    • Money: $1.80 (One dollar and eighty cents) is mislabeled in the following ways:

180 1.80 $1.80¢ 1.80$ $1.8

    • When students are given inches in a prompt, their answers are mislabeled feet.
conclusion and support
Conclusion and Support
  • Students need practice drawing conclusions and giving quantitative support for their conclusions.
    • Valid conclusions are based on the data or describe the data.
    • Support uses the specific data and/or information specific from the item.
number sense
Number Sense
  • Students have difficulties labeling fractional parts.
    • Examples of mislabels:
number sense1
Number Sense
  • Students do not know how to represent a remainder in decimal form.
  • Student writes an answer as 12.3 instead of 12 ¾ on the answer line.
  • Students do not understand the meaning of the “remainder” in division problems.
measurement
Measurement
  • Students have difficulty computing with time and representing the answers.
    • 12:10 means 12 hours ten minutes elapsed time.
    • 12.1 hours means 12 hours 6 minutes.
    • 12:10 P.M. means 10 minutes after 12 noon.
  • Students continue to use 100 minutes for one hour instead of sixty minutes for one hour, when computing elapsed time.
algebraic sense
Algebraic Sense
  • Students need practice writing expressions and equations that represent a situation.
  • They can solve a problem, but do not write an equation or expression that represents what they have done.
  • Students need to understand the difference between expressions and equations and a correct way to represent expressions and equations using variables.
    • Examples of expressions:

4x3, t+2, 20t

    • Examples of equations:

4x3=12, c=20t

geometric sense

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Geometric Sense
  • When plotting points on a coordinate grid, students are showing the tracking lines that help them locate the points.
geometric sense1
Geometric Sense
  • Students need practice sorting figures using more than one attribute: i.e. four-sided figures with exactly one line of symmetry.
  • When sorting figures with specific attributes, students mistakenly assume that there is an equal number of figures for each attribute.
  • Students need to use a ruler or straight edge when drawing figures.
probability and statistics
Probability and Statistics
  • Students need to understand measures of central tendency: mean, median, and mode.
  • Students do not make lists of all possible outcomes.
  • Students have difficulty determining the probabilities of events.
solves problems reasons logically
Solves Problems/Reasons Logically
  • Students should answer the question that is being asked!

See page 4

communication

IT

Communication
  • Students have difficulty writing questions that can be answered from given information.
    • When students write:

“The cost of a milkshake and a donut = ”

They do not receive credit because it is not a question.

    • They should write:

“What is the cost of a milkshake and a donut?”

in summary to increase math scores
In Summary:To Increase Math Scores
  • Answer the question being asked.
  • Show work to show how you got your answer.
  • Peace, Love, and Joy!