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Helping Students Navigate the Path to College: What High Schools Can Do. Sponsored by the Kansas City Area P-20 Council and REL Central at McREL in partnership with the Kansas City Area Research Consortium (KC-AERC).

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helping students navigate the path to college what high schools can do

Helping Students Navigate the Path to College: What High Schools Can Do

Sponsored by the Kansas City Area P-20 Council and REL Central at McREL

in partnership with the Kansas City Area Research Consortium (KC-AERC)

slide2

"Lifting graduation rates. Preparing our graduates to succeed in this economy. Making college affordable. That's how we'll put higher education within reach for anyone who wants it. That's how we'll reach our goal of once again leading the world in college graduation rates by the end of this decade.” President Obama, 2010

slide3

“It's an economic issue when nearly eight in 10 new jobs will require workforce training or higher education by the end of this decade.” President Obama, 2010Georgetown’s Center on Education and the Workforce predicts for 2018 Missouri’s Need: 59%of 1.8 million jobs Kansas’ Need:64% of 1 million jobsBoth states will need 185,000 additional people completing post-secondary degrees than we currently have by 2018.

slide4

“In a single generation, we’ve fallen from first to 12th in college graduation rates for young adults. That’s unacceptable, but not irreversible.” President Obama, 2010

1970

Now

Source: Education Equality Project

the completion agenda
The Completion Agenda

President Obama’s Goal

Lumina Foundation’s Big Goal

“Increase the proportion of Americans with high quality degrees and credentials to 60 percent by the year 2025.”

  • “Education is the issue of our time.”
  • Increase the college graduate rates in the United States from 40% to 60% by 2020.
  • Produce 8 million additional college graduates among 25-34 year olds.
why this why now in kansas city
Why this, why now in Kansas City?

Kansas City Area P20 Council

overview of p20 asset mapping
Overview of P20 Asset Mapping
  • Missouri Department of Elementary & Secondary Education Support
      • Contracted with Kansas City Area Education Research Consortium (KC-AERC) to Conduct Asset Map of Region
  • Collected core asset information
    • 10 educational sectors
    • 9 regional counties
      • Missouri – Cass, Clay, Jackson, Platte, Ray
      • Kansas – Johnson, Leavenworth, Miami, Wyandotte
  • Compiled information into database
  • Conduct a SWOT Analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) of collected data
kansas city area p20 council proposed focus areas
Kansas City Area P20 CouncilProposed Focus Areas

Increase the number of high school graduates successfully transitioning to post-secondary institutions.

Increase the number of post-secondary students attaining degrees and other credentials needed for career employability.

next steps for kansas city p20
Next Steps for Kansas City P20
  • Focus on five counties including: Jackson, Clay, Platte (in Missouri); Wyandotte and Johnson (in Kansas).
  • Create a large, comprehensive coalition comprised of business, civic, labor, government, political, educational and nonprofit leaders in the five county region to address two work on focus areas.
why this why now in kansas city1
Why this, why now in Kansas City?

Partners with P20 Council for today’s event

  • YOU as the participants
  • Greater Kansas City P20 Council Steering Committee
    • Honorable Cindy Circo, Thalia Cherry, Debbie Goodall, Laura Loyacono, Linda Washburn
  • Kansas City Area Education Research Consortium (KC-AERC)
    • Dr. Leigh Anne Taylor Knight, Dr. Joseph Heppert & Sarah Frazelle
  • Central Region Educational Laboratory (REL Central at McREL)
    • Susan Lopez & Heather Hoak

Dr. Jeff Williams

Vice President for Higher Education, Kauffman Scholars, Inc., and Member, Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) Board of Directors

post secondary access and success matter to the kansas city area
Post-Secondary Access and SuccessMatter to the Kansas City Area

Bob Marcusse

President and CEO

Kansas City Area Development Council

post secondary access and success matters to the kansas city area
Post-Secondary Access and SuccessMatters to the Kansas City Area
  • Terry Akins, Business Manager, IBEW Local 124
  • Scott Anglemeyer, Executive Director, Workforce Partnership
  • Dr. Terry Barnes, Assistant to the Provost, Community College Partnerships and Workforce Development, MU
  • Cindy Circo, Kansas City, Missouri, Councilwoman
  • Laura Evans, Talent Strategist, Cerner Corporation
  • Greg Graves, Chairman of the Board, Greater KC Chamber of Commerce, and President  and CEO of Burns & McDonnell
  • Bob Marcusse, President and CEO, Kansas City Area Development Council
slide14

Regional Educational Laboratory System

To serve the educational needs of designated regions—using applied research, development, dissemination, and training and technical assistance—to bring the latest and best research to school improvement efforts.

slide15

Regional Educational Laboratory ProgramU.S. Department of ED

  • Provide analytic help to states and districts in each of ten regions
  • REL Central serves Kansas and Missouri, along with Colorado, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming
  • RELs conduct:
    • Rigorous Studies
    • Fast Response Project Reports
    • Bridging Research to Policy and Practice Events
bridging research and practice events
Bridging Research and Practice Events

Create opportunities for practitioners and policymakers to learn about the latest evidence-based research

Provide a forum for educators to engage with researchers and each other to improve practice

Inspire the development of communities of practice as a strategy for providing on-going technical assistance

ies practice guides
IES Practice Guides

PurposeTo provide practical recommendations for educators to address everyday challenges

Practices Guides:

  • Are developed by a panel of nationally recognized researchers and practitioners
  • Provide a systematic review of research on topics challenging to educators
  • Include actionable recommendations, concrete how to steps, roadblocks and solutions, and indicators of the strength of evidence supporting each recommendation
ies practice guides selected titles
IES Practice Guides Selected Titles

Assisting Students Struggling with Mathematics: Response to Intervention (RtI) for Elementary and Middle Schools

Assisting Students Struggling with Reading: Response to Intervention (RtI) and Multi-Tier Intervention in the Primary Grades

Using Student Achievement Data to Support Instructional Decision Making

what works clearinghouse
What Works Clearinghouse
  • Publishes Practice Guides
  • In-Depth Research Reviews in Critical Areas
  • Quick Reviews of Recently Released Studies
  • Resources for Supervisors and School Leaders and Classroom Teachers
ies practice guides1
IES Practice Guides
  • Recommendations for use by educators to develop practices to increase access to higher education
  • Target audience is individuals who work in schools and districts
  • Dr. William Tierney is the chair of the expert panel for this Practice Guide
improving access to college

Improving Access to College

William G. Tierney

University Professor,

Wilbur Kieffer Professor of Higher Education

Director,

Center for Higher Education Policy Analysis

http:/www.usc.edu/dept/chepa/

slide26

In today’s dollars, bachelor’s degree recipients can expect to earn about 1 million more during working careers than high school graduates.

slide27
Median income of workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher is about double the income for those with only a high school degree.
slide30
Kansas System of Higher Education: Fall 2010 Preliminary Report

Headcount Enrollment

Source: Kansas System Enrollment Report to Regents January 19, 2011.

slide31
Percent of adults age 24-64 with an associate’s degree of higher: United States and Kansas

Source: Jones & Kelly (2007) based on U.S. Census Bureau 2005 American Community Survey

percent of adults with a bachelor s degree or higher united states california and kansas
Percent of adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher: United States, California, and Kansas

Source: U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey, 2006-08 3 Year Estimates

slide34
There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don't know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don't know we don't know.

Donald Rumsfeld

slide37

Offer courses that prepare

students for college-level

work.

slide38

Ensure that students

understand what constitutes a

college-ready curriculum by

9th grade.

slide40

Utilize assessment measures

throughout high school.

slide41

Assist students in overcoming

deficiencies as they are

identified.

slide43

Surround students with adults

and peers who support

college-going aspirations.

slide45

Assist students in completing

critical steps for college entry.

slide50

Recommendation 1

Offer courses that prepare

students for college-level work.

slide51

Implement a curriculum that

prepares all students for

college.

slide52

Include opportunities for

college-level work for

advanced students.

slide53

Ensure students understand

what constitutes a college-

ready curriculum.

Develop a four-year course

trajectory with each 9th grader.

recommendation 21
Recommendation 2

Utilize assessment measures

throughout high school.

slide55

Utilize performance data to

inform students about their

proficiency.

slide57

Offer courses and curricula

that prepare students for

college-level work.

slide58

Recommendation 3

Surround students with adults

and peers who support

college-going aspirations.

slide60

Facilitate student relationships

with peers who plan to attend

college.

slide61

Provide hands-on opportunities

for students to explore different

careers.

slide62

Recommendation 4

Ensure students prepare for,

and take, the appropriate

college entrance exam.

slide65

Assist students in completing

critical steps for college entry.

slide66

Recommendation 5

Increase families’ financial

awareness.

slide67

Help students and parents

complete financial aid forms.

slide68

Organize workshops about

college affordability,

scholarship, and financial aid.

slide70

Teachers may not be trained

to teach advanced courses.

Enrolling students who are not

prepared for academic rigor in

college prep classes is seen

As counterproductive.

slide71

Mentoring relationships between

students and mentors do not last;

the availability of mentors

changes over time.

Ninth-grade students are not

interested in discussing

their career interests.

slide72

The school already offers

many extracurricular activities.

slide73

There are insufficient

resources to offer college

access programs, or that bring

together college-going peers.

slide75

The time and distance

required to travel to test prep

sites is a problem.

slide76

Staff do not have current

information about college

requirements.

slide77

Parents have limited time to

participate in college visits

slide78

The school does not have staff

who are trained on financial

aid policy.

slide80

Prepare students for cultural

and social challenges in

college.

slide81

Foster relationships with

middle schools, community

colleges, and four-year

institutions.

slide83
Understand how technology is

transforming our lives – and

education

slide88

Schools and School Districts

Over thirty public school districts,

as well as additional private, parochial and charter schools,

spread over the five-county Kansas City metropolitan area

Collaborating Universities

KC-AERC has early-stage funding from the Kauffman Foundation.

slide89

Mission Statement

Our shared goal is to improve P-20 education for all students

in the Kansas City metropolitan area

by providing powerful tools for

data-driven educational research, evaluation and implementation.

  • Leading Community Organizations

Collaborative efforts are ongoing with local education agencies, foundations, chambers and economic development entities,

as well as the state education departments of Kansas and Missouri.

pilot research projects transitions to higher education and attainment
Pilot Research Projects: Transitions to Higher Education and Attainment
  • Two parallel studies linking district data to college attendance and attainment data provided by the National Clearinghouse.
    • Blue Valley School District—KU
    • Olathe School District-UMKC
  • Questions developed by key personnel within the two participating school districts.
olathe questions
Olathe Questions
  • How do patterns of college enrollment and persistence vary by gender, ethnicity, and free/reduced-lunch status?
  • How do these patterns compare to national data?
  • How do these patterns vary for students who have participated in the 21st Century Program?
blue valley questions
Blue Valley Questions
  • What are academic factors (courses taken, grades) that determine the selectivity of the post-secondary institution that students attend?
  • What are the academic factors that predict persistence at highly selective institutions?
what s working in the kc metro
What’s Working in the KC Metro?

Dr. Gretchen Sherk

Director of Secondary Programs

Olathe Public Schools

Dr. Elizabeth Parks

Director of Assessment & Research

Blue Valley School District

what s working in the kc metro1
What’s Working in the KC Metro?

Beth Collins

KCMSD A+ Coordinator & MCAC Site Supervisor

Paseo Academy of Fine & Performing Arts

CherelleWashinton

MCAC College Adviser

Paseo Academy of Fine & Performing Arts

Meaghan Brougher

MCAC College Adviser

Van Horn High School

processing and providing input
Processing and Providing Input
  • No forgone conclusions
  • Research to inform
  • Local context
    • Identify collective issues and ideas
    • Next steps: Actionable items at individual sites and as a metropolitan community
kansas city area p20 council proposed focus areas1
Kansas City Area P20 CouncilProposed Focus Areas

Increase the number of high school graduates successfully transitioning to post-secondary institutions.

Increase the number of post-secondary students attaining degrees and other credentials needed for career employability.

processing and providing input1
Processing and Providing Input
  • Rate the Focus Areas
  • Identify Actions Needed to address Focus Areas
  • Identify one or all of the following:
    • Resources
    • Gaps
    • Other Key Stakeholders
    • Strategies YOU want to see employed at your site and/or in the metropolitan area