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Orientation to the VA Board of Ordained Ministry

Orientation to the VA Board of Ordained Ministry

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Orientation to the VA Board of Ordained Ministry

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Presentation Transcript

  1. Orientation to the VA Board of Ordained Ministry

  2. The Vision… More people More young people More diverse people “All Things New” is a core strategy to meet the challenge and achieve the vision The Challenge… The Strategic Plan…

  3. Purpose The Virginia Conference Board of Ordained Ministry will enable disciples of Jesus Christ to become effective clergy, diaconal ministers, and certified lay professionals. To this end, the Board assists these persons with God’s continuing work in the areas of call, development, and collegial support.

  4. Functions • As defined in Par. 635 (2012 BOD) • Policies and Procedures of the VA Board of Ordained Ministry

  5. Structure • Full Board of Ordained Ministry (67 members, 3 cabinet reps, 1 staff person) • Executive Committee (24 plus 3 cabinet reps, 1 staff person) • Advisory Committee (8 plus 3 cabinet reps, 1 staff person)

  6. Organization • Board Committees • Interview Committees

  7. Commitments • Attendance and preparation • Confidentiality • Solidarity in regard to BOM business, actions, and decisions (speaking with one voice) • Remember your role as a member of the BOM

  8. Board Committees • See Functions of the Board on pp. 45-48 • See List of BOM Committees and Membership in Appendix

  9. Priorities for 2008-2012 • A culture of excellence among clergy leaders • Successful use of the compassionate coaching and redirection for those who are badly matched to ministry; not allowing mediocrity to stay; clarity in communication about new processes, especially for those who are doing good ministry but serve very difficult appointments. • Partnership between Board and Cabinet around the new process for transitioning ineffective clergy and around communicating that process clearly. More accountability on clergy continuing education by the district superintendents.

  10. Priorities continued • More candidates being recommended their first time applying for provisional membership. For issues of morale, expense and excellence, it would be far better to have far fewer candidates leaving the District level unprepared. Standards for candidates, especially the application thereof, and possibly the levels by which they are rated—“should we be passing the unexceptional?” Stronger relationships with seminary students and seminary programs to ensure candidates are well-prepared. Clarity and support around expectations for DCOM’s.

  11. Priorities (continued) • Stronger clarity about the diversity of gifts for ministry that are needed within the bounds of the Conference; understanding about ways that diversity in ministry style/demographic characteristics can be effectively acknowledged while keeping high standards about United Methodist essentials.