digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitions professorial lecture l.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitions Professorial lecture PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitions Professorial lecture

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 59

Digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitions Professorial lecture - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 327 Views
  • Uploaded on

Digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitions Professorial lecture Diana Laurillard

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitions Professorial lecture' - albert


Download Now An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitions professorial lecture

Digital technologies and their role in achieving our educational ambitionsProfessorial lecture

Diana Laurillard

slide2

OutlineThe challenges in our educational policy ambitionsEducation from the learner’s point of view Contributions from digital technologiesWhat it takes to learn: how theory challenges technologyAn e-learning strategy: how policy challenges technologySupporting teachers as agents of technology innovationGetting from ‘here’ to a desirable ‘there’

educational policy ambitions
Educational policy ambitions

“To protect against entry to negative pathways and reverse those that have already begun, continued investment in educational interventions is needed across all of middle childhood. The results reported here may therefore be seen as making an important contribution to the evidence on which the case for more and continued intervention depends.”

(Feinstein and Bynner, 2004)

“The question of the nature and scope of the transformation which must take place in mainstream schools if they are to become inclusive schools . . . has been largely ignored. . . . inclusion is not merely about placement into an unchanged system of provision and practice. It is about changes to the curriculum, teaching styles, organisation and support systems within schools.”

(Barton and Armstrong, 2003)

“Our results suggest . . . maximizing individualization and differentiation by teaching to small groups.”

(Blatchford et al., 2007)

Better teaching and more personalised support for every child, whatever their needs

An interesting, broad and rich curriculum with more choice and a wider set of out-of-hours opportunities

Every young person able to develop the skills they need for employment and for life

The flexibility to combine school, college and work-based training

More school sixth form, sixth form college and vocational provision, to give more choice to students

Every adult to be able to get and build on the skills they need for employment

Lifelong learning for all – for work or for pleasure – with the widest possible array of good quality courses

High quality university courses with excellent teaching

Access to university for those who have the potential to benefit

More and better flexible opportunities to study

more and better
More and better…

“all young people in full or part-time education to age 18”

Leitch Report, 2007

Level 1

Level 2

Level 4

Enhancing excellence in learning and teaching

Widening participation

Enhancing the contribution of HE to economy and society

HEFCE strategy, 2006

“all schools should reflect a commitment to personalised learning in their learning and teaching policies and plans”

Gilbert 2020 vision

“High quality teaching”

“More personalisation of learning”

DfES 5-year strategy, 2005

how is this learning to be supported
How is this learning to be supported?

“I worry about making sure I speak to each child individually each day – I want them to know that I care about them, not just their group or their class” (Y5, 32 pupils).

“It is very difficult to get around and see, on a one-to-one basis, each child when you have a class above 25. Children with learning difficulties and slow learners do not get a fair deal, especially if they receive little or no additional support” (Y4).

(Blatchford et al, 2007)

10 minutes additional personal teaching per child, per week = 3000 new primary teachers. (cf +1000, pro rata in 10 years)

Modelling personalisation:

100k new L1 learners per year, for 6 weeks @ 1:20 ratio = 500 new teachers for literacy, 1000 for numeracy

Modelling quantity - Leitch:

How is it possible to meet these demands without changing our conventional models of teaching and learning?

slide7

What can technology do to support the learner’s journey?

Learner needs: personalisation, flexibility and inclusion

Opportunities - linking education to job opportunities, e.g. the L4All project

Where will it take me?

Assessment for learning - formative feedback, e.g. Adaptive Feedback Framework

How do I know I’ve learned?

Constructionist pedagogies - tools for building knowledge, e.g. the TechnoMathematics project

How will I learn?

Flexibility - bridging the gap between work and study, e.g. The Homework project

How could I study?

Negotiating the curriculum - through open access to learning materials, e.g. OpenLearn

What can I learn?

Motivation to learn - through engaging and creative activities, e.g. Making Games

Why should I learn?

making games

Rule Editor

Activator

Trigger: Type 1 Spatial

Action

If Player enters Cylinder Trigger 11 Female Stormtrooper seeks and destroys Player

Making games

Virtual environment

Children design their own role-playing and action adventure games, engaging them inboth critical analysis and creative production of game designs

Creative thinking - combining imaginative acts with conceptual design - building and testing their own rules to fit the narrative structure

Layout design area

Rule editor

Buckingham, D and Burn, A (2007) 'Game-Literacy in Theory and Practice', Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, 16.3, October 2007

openlearn openlearn open ac uk
OpenLearn (openlearn.open.ac.uk)

Learners tell us they use OpenLearn to:

・enrich their current studies

・research into future course options

・build up a learning portfolio for CPD

・find quality learning materials quickly

・keep up with their subject or interest

・try out new subjects

An online learning website that is open to anyone, anywhere in the world, using materials taken from Open University courses. It is completely free.

the homework project
The Homework Project

Closed the gap between parents, teachers and learners; pre- and post-study maths tests suggest home use of the tablet is linked to learning.

Teachers can build individualised lessons for school and related activities for home

technomaths in the workplace

To company training:

  • play shove ha’penny
  • enter data by hand
  • calculate formulae by substituting values
TechnoMaths in the Workplace

Employees come to see statistical calculations as being based on relatively simple calculation steps which, far from being ‘magic’, are actually understandable.

Co-developed learning opportunities to allow employees to represent and manipulate mathematical models of processes

co-designed control chart:

technology-enhanced

shove ha’penny

From the shop-floor control chart

adaptive feedback framework
Adaptive Feedback Framework

Supports learners in reflecting on their personal ‘trails’;

identifies where the learner has gone wrong;

categorises the answer;

adaptively provides different types of feedback – informative, tutoring or reflective.

A personalisation engine can support adaptive feedback, e.g. guiding reflection on a ‘trail’ of learning activities

lifelong learning london for all
Lifelong Learning London for All

Supports collaborative learning to help learners formulate future learning goals and aspirations.

Tutors publish recommended pathways through courses and modules, thereby facilitating progression into HE and career

The portal allows learners to access selected information and resources, and plan their own timeline for learning - career pathways

what it takes to learn
What it takes to learn

- the learner is anactive agentin the learning process

There is a common thread in our understanding of learning

John Dewey

Jean Piaget

Lev Vygotsky

Jerome Bruner

Paulo Freire

Gordon Pask

Terry Winograd

Seymour Papert

Lauren Resnick

John Seely Brown

Ference Marton

Roger Säljö

John Biggs

Jean Lave

1890

.

.

1940

.

.

1960

.

.

1980

.

.

2000

.

.

Inquiry-based education

Constructivism

Mediated learning

Discovery learning

Learning as problematization

Learning as conversation

Problem-based learning

Reflective practice

Meta-cognition

Experiential learning

Learner-oriented approach

Social constructivism

Situated learning

1

share a common

conception

of the learning

process

2

what it takes to learn does not change
What it takes to learn does not change

Books, Blackboards, Slides

Broadcasts, Overhead projectors

Tape-slides

Interactive whiteboards, Powerpoint

Web-pages, Podcasts

Learning through attention

Inquiry-based learning

Constructivism

Mediated learning

Discovery learning

Learning as conversation

Problem-based learning

Reflective practice

Meta-cognition

Experiential learning

Learner-oriented approach

Social constructivism

Situated learning

Modelling tools

Simulations

Chat-rooms

Online conferences

Multiplayer games

Wikis

Blogs

what does it take to learn
What does it take to learn?

Concepts

Answers

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Task goal

Learner’s practice

Practice environment

Actions

‘Instructionist’ - Teacher-focused

what does it take to learn18
What does it take to learn?

Concepts

Answers

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Feedback

Practice environment

Learner’s practice

Practice environment

Actions

Revisions

‘Constructionist’ - Practice-focused

what does it take to learn19
What does it take to learn?

“Adopting mastery approaches to learning, where learners aim to improve on their previous performance and continue to develop their knowledge and skills without reference to the progress of other learners, enhances motivation.”

(Hallam, 2005)

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Task goal

Feedback

Practice environment

Learner’s practice

Practice environment

Actions

Revisions

‘Constructionist’ - Practice-focused

what does it take to learn20
What does it take to learn?

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Task goal

Feedback

Practice environment

Learner’s practice

Practice environment

Actions

Revisions

‘Social learning’ - Learner-focused

what does it take to learn21
What does it take to learn?

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Practice environment

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

‘Collaborative learning’

what does it take to learn22
What does it take to learn?

- A Conversational Framework

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Practice environment

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Instructivism + Constructionism + Social learning + Collaborative

slide23

The Conversational FrameworkAn attempt to draw on the learning theories developed over the last century, and encapsulate them in a form that enables educators to test the technology against them.

slide25

Learning through attention…

Concepts

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Lecture, Presentation, Book, Educational television, Audio…

slide26

Learning through inquiry…

Concepts

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Tutorials, Libraries, Catalogues, Journals, Resource banks…

slide27

Learning through discussion…

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Tutorial, Seminar, Class discussion, Small group discussion…

slide28

Learning through practice…

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Problem sheet, practice exercises, project work…

slide29

Learning through collaboration…

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Laboratory, Small group work, Fieldwork, Workshop…

slide30

Learning through production…

Concepts

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Essay, program, solution, design, product, performance…

slide32

Learning through attention…

Concepts

“most educational materials on the web and on CD-ROM are distinctly limited . . . visually impoverished, lacking in interactivity, and thin on engaging content. . . . Our research on educational games has found that the learning content in such games is detached from the game-play . . . merely a kind of reward for getting the questions right.

(Buckingham, 2005)

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Powerpoint, Digital video, Animation, Podcast…

Lecture, Presentation, Book, Educational television, Audio…

slide33

Learning through inquiry…

Concepts

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Online resource, Digital library, Website, Search engine…

Libraries, Catalogues, Journals, Resource banks…

slide34

Learning through discussion…

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Online conferencing, Forum, Chat room, Wiki…

Tutorial, Seminar, Class discussion, Small group discussion…

slide35

Learning through practice…

Answers

Answers

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Outputs

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Interactive simulation, Spreadsheet, Data analysis tool, Game…

Problem sheet, practice exercises, project work…

slide36

Learning through collaboration…

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, Multiplayer games…

Laboratory, Small group work, Fieldwork, Workshop…

slide37

Learning through production…

Concepts

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

Essay, program, solution, design, product, performance…

Powerpoint, Program, Model, Website, Design, Digital video…

slide39

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

New media and delivery technologies for knowledge development– Recent history

Interactive computers

Local drives & discs

WIMP interfaces

Internet

Multimedia

Worldwide Web

Laptops

Email

Search engines

Broadband

3G mobiles

Blogs

- new medium for articulating ideas

- local storage with the user

- devices for ease of access to content

- mass production / distribution of content

- elaborated forms of content

- wide access to extensive content

- personal portable access to the medium

- mass delivery of messages

- easier access to extensive content

- rich content / immediate communication

- low-cost access to elaborate content

- personal mass publishing

slide40

Old media and delivery technologies for knowledge development– Not so recent history

0

1400s

1600s

1400s

1800s

1900s

1500s

1800s

1900s

1940s

1950s

1700s

Writing

Paper

Indexes, paragraphs

Printing

Photos, sound, film

Libraries

Published books

Postal services

Bibliographies

Television, phones

Paperbacks

Pamphlets

- new medium for articulating ideas

- local storage with the user

- devices for ease of access to content

- mass production / distribution of content

- elaborated forms of content

- wide access to extensive content

- personal portable access to the medium

- mass delivery of messages

- easier access to extensive content

- rich content / immediate communication

- low-cost access to elaborate content

- personal mass publishing

slide41

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

Old media and delivery technologies against the new

0

1400s

1600s

1400s

1800s

1900s

1500s

1800s

1900s

1940s

1950s

1700s

Writing

Paper

Indexes, paragraphs

Printing

Photos, sound, film

Libraries

Published books

Postal services

Bibliographies

Television, phones

Paperbacks

Pamphlets

Interactive computers

Local drives & discs

WIMP interfaces

Internet

Multimedia

Worldwide Web

Laptops

Email

Search engines

Broadband

3G mobiles

Blogs

slide42

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

Interactive computers

Local drives & discs

WIMP interfaces

Old media and delivery technologies against the new

0

1400s

1400s

1500s

1600s

1700s

1800s

1800s

1900s

1900s

1940s

1950s

Writing

Paper

Printing

Published books

Indexes, paragraphs

Pamphlets

Photos, sound, film

Postal services

Libraries

Bibliographies

Television, phones

Paperbacks

Interactive computers

Local drives & discs

WIMP interfaces

Internet

Multimedia

Worldwide Web

Laptops

Email

Search engines

Broadband

3G mobiles

Blogs

30 years

other reasons for lack of technology innovation
Other reasons for lack of technology innovation
  • Education is a complex system of powerful, stable drivers, which do not embrace technology
  • Education leaders are not comfortable with technology as a component of strategy
  • Education is national, political - not so subject to market forces
  • Teaching practitioners have neither the power nor the means to innovate
  • Education is a complex system of powerful, stable drivers, which do not embrace technology
  • Education leaders are not comfortable with technology as a component of strategy
  • Education is national, political - not so subject to market forces
  • Teaching practitioners have neither the power nor the means to innovate
a policy driven strategy for technology
A policy-driven strategy for technology?

Education policy initiatives do not necessarily work, e.g. policy for the Skills sector is not yet delivering (Frank Coffield, Inaugural 2007):

“Towards a learning system”- for education, not just Skills

Focus on professional learning within a community context (Kathryn Riley and Louise Stoll, Inaugural, 2005)

So we need a system that “shows itself capable of learning”, and “an explicit model of learning and change” (Coffield 2007).

“It is a culture that sees the ideal practitioner as a technician who is regularly upgraded in order to implement without question the latest government initiative – ‘We will ensure that the workforce can implement what they are asked to do’ (DfES, 2005a: 25). The teaching profession is being re-formed, as Geoff Whitty argued, with teachers being restricted to ‘craft skills rather than professional understanding’ (Whitty, 1997)..”

“In all the pelting torrent of official documents which have flooded the sector since 1997, there is, however, one significant silence: there is no discussion of, and not even a definition of, the central concept of learning”. (Coffield, 2007).

“And all of this depends . . . on a radically reshaped system . . . and in particular a reshaped role for Local Government and for my Department, moving away from direction towards an enabling and empowering role. It depends on freedom for those at the front line to personalise services and to improve them”. (DfES 2005)

Really changing practice is extremely difficult. . . . insufficient time is made available [for] observing peers, engaging in action research, trying out and practising new strategies, reflecting seriously on how they work with different pupils, learning from these reflections, and adapting and refining them as necessary. (Riley and Stoll, 2005)

what does it take to learn45
What does it take to learn?

- A Conversational Framework

Concepts Answers

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Other learner(s)

Questions

Outputs

Ideas

Adapt Task practice environment

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Task goal

Draft outputs

Feedback

Practice environment

Learner’s practice

Other learner(s)

Practice environment

Draft outputs

Actions

Revisions

slide46

Successful policy intervention:A government that shows itself capable of learningAn explicit model of learning and of change(Coffield, 2007)

the role of the teaching profession
The role of the teaching profession

Responding to:Curriculum requirementsQuality assurance / inspectionAssessment requirementsFunding pressuresResources available+ learners’ needs

E-Learning Strategy:

Engage key agencies to support teachers as innovators -

TTA (TDA)

LLUK

HEA

‘become effective ICT users and innovators’

‘build a professional workforce which can both collaborate and innovate’ (DfES 2005)

what does it take to learn for teachers learning
What does it take to learn: for teachers learning?

Concepts Answers

Requirements

Responses

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Curriculum and assessment policy

Other learner(s)

Other teacher(s)

Teacher’s ideas

QuestionsOutputs

Ideas

Adapt

actions

Adapt

practice tasks

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Learner’s goal

Learner needs

Task goal

Draft outputs

Plans, learning designs

Learner actions

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Teacher’s practice

Other teacher(s)

Other learner(s)

Learners learning

Practice environment

Plans, learning designs

Draft outputs

Teaching

Actions

Revised teaching

Revisions

what does it take to learn for teachers learning49
What does it take to learn: for teachers learning?

Concepts Answers

Requirements

Responses

Ideas

Learner’s ideas

Teacher’s ideas

Curriculum and assessment policy

Other learner(s)

Other teacher(s)

Teacher’s ideas

QuestionsOutputs

Ideas

Adapt

actions

Adapt

practice tasks

Adapt

actions

Adapt

actions

Reflect

Reflect

Reflect

Learner’s goal

Learner needs

Task goal

Draft outputs

Plans, learning designs

Learner actions

Feedback

Learner’s practice

Teacher’s practice

Other teacher(s)

Other learner(s)

Learners learning

Practice environment

Plans, learning designs

Draft outputs

Teaching

Actions

Revised teaching

Revisions

slide50

A system capable of learning?DialogicIterativeAdaptiveCollaborativeConstructive- populate our education system with the missing links in the Conversational Framework

slide51

A system capable of learning?1 Give policy-makers direct access to the practice of T&L2 Create a dialogue between policy-makers and teachers that allows questions / responses, not just requirements / records3 Enable teachers to build their own ideas into practice, and develop them through reflection on practice4 Enable teachers to collaborate, exchange ideas, share plans

teachers learning how to learn
Teachers learning how to learn

We need to understand how to foster collaborative learning

Teaching as a design science?

But teachers lack the tools to design, experiment, share and collaborate

Computer-supported collaborative learning for teachers?

“This phenomenon is relatively uncharted territory in educational research. Whilst much is unknown about the institutional conditions that help teachers to learn new classroom practices, there is even less understanding about how knowledge is created and shared across schools.”

(James, Black, McCormick, Pedder, Wiliam, 2006)

design tools for teaching professionals
Design tools for teaching professionals

User requirements:

  • Multi-level planning i.e. course, module, session, activity, learning object
  • Flexible editing, adaptable to users’ needs
  • Ease of use and simple manipulable learning design components
  • A way of capturing the context of learning design that can be easily understood, interpreted, evaluated and shared
  • An instantiation of learning designs as a sequence of learning activities
  • Support for teacher collaboration
  • Alternative forms of representations - structured text, diagrams, concept-mapping representations...
  • A way of ensuring coherence between each of the components of a learning design, such as topics, outcomes, methods, tools, staff resource, and student workload.
learning design tools

300

300

150 39 48 18 45

300

300

114 33 90 18 45

Learning design tools

“It encourages thinking outside current teaching box and therefore use of other methods”

“This is more useful than I expected it to be”

“…very good for integrating learning technologies and the learning design process”

The lecturer assigns the basic Module or Session information, such as contact time, private study time, aims, topics, outcomes, according to institutional requirements

Teacher can model different selections of teaching methods and check effect on learning experience and staff time

learning design tools55

Create Topic

Create Learning Outcome

Learning design tools

“The mapping principle is sound, and multiple mappings are important – really nice and visual”

“… it does make you think”

“This is good reflective/thinking tool – I particularly like its visual aspects of seeing the modules and learning outcomes as a whole”

Supports process of aligning aims - topics - methods - outcomes - assessment

learning design tools56
Learning design tools

Exports design to HTML file according to local format, to share with staff and students

“I like this very much, because it’s mapped in my topics for me and it’s showing me them in weeks and it’s showing where they can overlap.”

Supports scheduling and analysis of of what is needed for each Period of learning

learning design tools57

Understanding processes within a system through a role-play activity to explain it

Learning design tools

Link to website explaining the system through a simulation

Role-play group activity

Chat room to compare explanations

Vote on the best explanation

Voting

The sequence of learning activities embodies a pedagogic idea - captured for others to adopt, adapt, re-use, and share.

slide58

Education as a learning systemTeachers can experiment with resource modelling Digital environments record learner and teacher activityDesign tools could support alternative, blended modelsLearning design tools could turn teaching into a reflective, adaptive and collaborative design process

How does changing the mix of resources affect students’ learning outcomes? (Levačić, 2005)

to summarise
To summarise…

Give pedagogy back to the teachers.Embrace technology as part of the solution.Begin with ambition and use technology to achieve it.