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by peter. ON DISPLAY AT ITS FIRST VENUE IN AUSTRALIA: Melbourne Museum 30 May - 24 August. Section 1 - Introduction. Displays, images and interactives in this section include: The Dinosaur Egg Hunt section panel When did the hunt for dinosaur eggs begin?

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by peter
by peter

ON DISPLAY AT ITS FIRST VENUE IN AUSTRALIA:

Melbourne Museum 30 May - 24 August

section 1 introduction
Section 1 - Introduction

Displays, images and interactives in this section include:

  • The Dinosaur Egg Hunt section panel
  • When did the hunt for dinosaur eggs begin?
  • Where are Dinosaur Eggs Found? E&D (Exploration and Discovery)
  • The Egg Hunters E&D panel
  • Dinosaur Babies in Australia E&D panel
  • Who’s who of dinosaur egg discoveries and studies
  • The Nobel Egg film
  • How did the hard shelled egg change life on earth?
  • World’s largest and smallest hard shelled eggs
  • Is it an egg or not an egg?
  • Is it a dinosaur egg?
  • Are dinosaur eggs similar to bird eggs?
slide5

Section 2 - Ceratopsian BabiesThis section features a flock of young Protoceratops patterned after the stunning discovery made in Mongolia of a group of 15 young dinosaurs that were buried alive. It is a rare fossil occurrence known as a ‘life assemblage’ caused by a catastrophic event so sudden that the dinosaurs were buried fast enough to preserve them in action

Displays, images and interactives in this section include:

  • Ceratopsian Babies section panel
  • Ceratopsian Nursery E&D panel
  • Baby Protoceratops film
  • Protoceratops adult fleshed model with 3 juveniles
  • Protoceratops adult skeleton with 5 juvenile skeletons
  • Protoceratops skulls: juvenile, small, medium and large
  • Framed artwork by Mark Hallett of Protoceratops and Velociraptor locked in battle
  • Framed artwork by Luis Rey of Cretaceous China with 2 adult Psittacosaurs
  • Psittacosaurus skeleton with 5 juvenile skeletons
  • 6 Psittacosaurus juvenile skeleton in matrix
  • Psittacosaurus nest of 38 babies
slide14

Section 3 - Sauropod EggsA collection of sauropod dinosaur eggs from around the world is complemented by artwork by Luis Rey that was commissioned for this exhibition

Displays, images and interactives in this section include:

  • Sauropod Eggs section panel
  • Sauropod Nesting Grounds E&D panel
  • Framed artwork by Luis Rey
  • Sauropod eggs from China, Mongolia, France, India and Argentina
  • Sauropod film
  • Dig pit for children to discover sauropod eggs
  • Photo by Louie Psihoyos Which Came First?
slide19

Section 4 Ornithopod EggsThis section features a collection of dinosaur eggs and nests of eggs from China. Visitors can touch a real fossilized ‘duck bill’ dinosaur leg bone from North America.

Displays, images and interactives in this section include:

  • Ornithopod Eggs section panel
  • Doubts About Duckbills E&D panel
  • Framed artwork by Mark Hallett
  • Assortment of ornithopod eggs and nests from China
  • Real hadrosaur leg bone for touching
  • Juvenile hadrosaur leg bone
  • Adult & Juvenile hadrosaur skull
  • Dig pit for children to discover ornithopod eggs
  • Photo by Louie Psihoyos Dinosaur Workshop
  • Photo by Louie Psihoyos How Fast Did They Grow?
slide24

Section 5 - Theropod EggsThis section features a collection of elongated eggs of various sizes. A case of mistaken identity when first discovered in 1923, they were attributed to the Ceratopsian dinosaur Protoceratops. The latest new discoveries prove they are actually from a theropod dinosaur misnamed oviraptor meaning egg thief.

Displays, images and interactives in this section include:

  • Theropod Eggs section panel
  • Were Oviraptors Good Parents? E&D panel
  • Oviraptor photo by Louie Psihoyos
  • Framed artworks by Luis Rey
  • Oviraptor Embryo Model
  • Oviraptor skeleton with egg nest
  • Theropod eggs of various sizes including a complete nest of 33 eggs
  • Tyrannosaur skulls: Adult, juvenile and juvenile; illustrating different stages of growth (9 meter Tyrannosaur skeleton also available at additional cost)
  • Dig pit for children to discover theropod eggs
slide33

Section 6 - Oviraptor HatchlingWho is ‘Baby Louie’? This section features the dinosaur embryo discovered by Charlie Magovern and photographed for National Geographic magazine by Louie Psihoyos

Specimens, images and interactives in this section include:

  • Oviraptor Hatchling section panel
  • Framed artwork by Luis Rey
  • Baby Louie film
  • Baby Louie fossil cast
  • Baby Louie model
  • 8 foot diameter theropod egg nest for touching
  • Photo by Louie Psihoyos Giant Oviraptor Nest
slide36

Section 7 - Dinosaur EnigmaTherizinosaur (thair-uh-ZINE-uh-saur) This section features discoveries by paleotechnician Terry Manning of fossilized embryos of an unusual theropod dinosaur that has characteristics of both meat eating theropods and plant eating ornithopods.

Specimens, images and interactives in this section include:

  • Dinosaur Enigma section panel
  • Hatching a Mystery E&D Panel
  • Framed artwork by Luis Rey
  • Therizinosaur clutch of 18 eggs
  • Therizinosaur model
contributing scientists
Contributing Scientists:

Robert T. Bakker, Curator, Paleontology Department

Houston Museum of Natural Science

Kenneth Carpenter, Chief Preparator, Curator of Paleontology

Denver Museum of Nature and Science

Luis Chiappe, Curator and Chairman, Division of Paleontology

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County

Karen Chin, Curator of Paleontology

University of Colorado Museum, Boulder

Philip J. Currie, Head of Dinosaur Research

Royal Tyrrell Museum, Alberta, Canada

Jacques Gauthier, Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology

Peabody Museum, Yale University

Karl Hirsch (deceased)

University of Colorado, Boulder

John ‘Jack’ Horner, Curator of Paleontology

Montana State University, Museum of the Rockies

Mark Norell, Curator and Chairman, Division of Paleontology

American Museum of Natural History

Darla Zelenitsky

University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Jinyuan Liu, Curator

Dalian Natural History Museum, China

contributing artists
Contributing Artists:

Brian Cooley

Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Mark Hallett

Portland, Oregon

William Monteleone

Alista Viejo, California

Gregory Paul

Baltimore, Maryland

John Sibbick

London, England

Luis Rey

London, England

Dennis Wilson

Denver, Colorado

Exhibition Photographer:

Louie Psihoyos

Boulder, Colorado

slide41
For additional information and booking schedule

contact Australian representative Peter Norton

Gondwana Studios

E-mail: info@gondwanastudios.com

Phone: (03) 6323 3765 or 0418367282

Website: www.gondwanastudios.com

Exhibition site: www.stonecompany.com