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Enlarging The Sorting Hat: Multiple Measures For Placement. brad.bostian@cpcc.edu. Let’s Review Our Assumptions Placing some students into developmental education is a good idea Placement should be based on the knowledge students have when they enter college. First Assumption

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slide1

Enlarging The Sorting Hat:

Multiple Measures For Placement

brad.bostian@cpcc.edu

slide2

Let’s Review Our Assumptions

Placing some students into developmental education is a good idea

Placement should be based on the knowledge students have when they enter college

slide3

First Assumption

Placing some students into developmental education is a good idea

After all, according to Clifford Adelman, students placed into multiple levels of dev. ed. fail to complete due to their lack of academic preparation, not the dev. ed. track itself

slide4

Second Assumption

Placement should be based on the knowledge students enter college with

ACT defines college readiness as the level of achievement a student needs to be ready to enroll and succeed —without remediation— in credit-bearing first-year postsecondary courses

slide5

And These Sub-Assumptions

  • College readiness is about content knowledge
  • Placement tests predict college success
  • Placement test items reflect college work
  • Students understand the importance of the placement tests
  • Students prepare for placement tests
  • Students survive developmental education
  • Developmental education improves college readiness
  • Developmental education solves the right problem
  • A blanket approach to placement can cover the right students
slide9

Math In-Order Course Completion and Enrollment – NC

TOTAL: 8%

Math students don’t get through

Enrolled

9%

GK

Algebra

Passed

16%

Not completed

2%

Not enrolled

7%

Enrolled

22%

1 level below

Passed

31%

Not completed

6%

Not enrolled

9%

Enrolled

43%

2 levels below

Passed

54%

Not completed

12%

Not enrolled

11%

Enrolled

77%

3+ levels below

Referred to Level 3+

1,507

Not completed

23%

  • Sample: 2002-2005 cohorts,
  • tracked for three years

Not enrolled

23%

From Dr. Tom Bailey, CCRC, presented to NC State Board of Community Colleges. Does not include students who didn’t test

slide12

Not

Getting

Through

slide30

Cost Benefit Changes Will Be More Incremental

  • An increase of 15% in the rate of recent high school graduates completing college level math in their first year might take a 13% graduation rate to 15%
  • And lower the cost per completer from $112,000 to $102,000
  • Moving to 100% completion of college math by year 2 would take a 13% graduation rate to 27%
  • And reduce cost per completer to $76,000
slide32

Is Grade Inflation An Issue?

---*--- HS GPA

---*--- College GPA

what if the student doesn t have a hs transcript
What If The Student Doesn’t Have A HS Transcript?
  • The CCRC study only got data on HS GPA for 37% of students
  • There will be data and matching issues
  • Colleges vary in collection rates, from >90% to <40%, with average ~60%
  • CPCC’s Rate Is Currently About 50%
slide34

Our New Statewide Policy

Students place college level with 2.6 unweighted high school GPA by 2015 Fall if

Transcripts are 5 years old or less and have FRC codes 1-4

Colleges will make local policies for out of state transcripts and missing FRC codes

Colleges may require students with GPA between 2.6-3.0 to take additional math labs for MAT 151 through MAT 171

future ready core course of study
Future-Ready Core: Course of Study

The Core (22 units)

- 4 credits of English

- 4 credits of Mathematics

- 4 credits of Social Studies

- 3 credits of Science

- 1 credit of Health/Physical Education

  • 6 Elective Credits (required)

• 2 credits from CTE, Arts or World Languages

• 4 credit Concentration (recommended)

slide36

*

4

1

2

3

4th Math

Geometry

Algebra I

Algebra II

Drafting

Statistics

Pre-Calculus

Engineering

Accounting I

AP Calculus

3

2

1

4

Future-Ready Core Math Sequence

Eligible for UNC System

+

+

Courses such as…

+

or

1

2

3

Integrated I

+

Integrated II

+

Integrated III

Eligible for comm. college

Courses such as…

In rare instances, students will be exempted from the Future-Ready Core math sequence. In cases where parents, teachers, counselors, principals and the students believe a different path is appropriate, the student will take the following sequence…

Upon Approval Math Substitution

Algebra II/Geometry or Integrated II

Future-Ready Core

Algebra I or Integrated I

Applied

Math I

Applied

Math II

*N.C.G.S. §115C-81(b) will remain in effect for students with learning disabilities in mathematics that will prevent those students from mastery Algebra I content. This student will be required to take 4 math classes aligned with their goals and abilities.

slide37

Multiple Measures Policy Continued

  • Students not meeting HS GPA 2.6 will place college level with:

English: ACT Reading 20 OR ACT English 18

SAT Writing 500 OR SAT Critical Reading 500

Math: ACT Math 22

SAT Math 500

  • Others will take Diagnostic Placement Tests

*No student should be placed into basic skills by placement test score alone, and without an additional measure

slide38

Reviewing Makes A Difference

From November 4, 2011 to June 27, 2012, students took 17,592 practice tests

  • 36% did the review
  • They went up 11 points on math, 6 on English
  • 46% went up at least one level
  • Saving $400,000 in unnecessary remediation
slide39

Does Reviewing Make A Difference?

Only 44% of colleges said they provided any practice tests, and “. . . many students did not know they were available” (Venezia, Bracco, & Nodine, 2010).

“It wasn’t a test of what you could do, but about what you could remember from a long time ago.”

“I came straight after high school, and I was doing algebra and geometry. After you are at so high a level, to come to college and get an assessment on just all basics—you’re really not in that mindset anymore. Even right after high school, you’re on to bigger and better problems, so to come back in [and do] fractions— what are fractions?”

slide40

Should Placement Tests Themselves Change?

Current tests have no projects, no research, no media, no writing process, no revision, no presentations, no formatting, no group work, no lab work, no purpose of interest to the student, no authentic assignments, no active learning, etc.

Diagnostics will help manage learning

slide42

Let’s Review Our Assumptions

Placing some students into developmental education is a good idea

Placement should be based on the knowledge students have when they enter college

slide43

And These Sub-Assumptions

  • College readiness is about content knowledge
  • Placement tests predict college success
  • Placement test items reflect college work
  • Students understand the importance of the placement tests
  • Students prepare for placement tests
  • Students survive developmental education
  • Developmental education improves college readiness
  • Developmental education solves the right problem
  • A blanket approach to placement can cover the right students