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    1. So, Whats New in the Common Core State Standards? Susan A Gendron Senior Fellow International Center for Leadership in Education June 2011

    2. Standards Charge Create the next generation of K-12 standards All students college and career ready in literacy and mathematics No later than end of high school Build upon the foundation laid by the states Create a vision of what it means to be a literate student in the twenty-first century Students who readily undertake the close, attentive reading that is the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature. Habitually perform the critical reading necessary to pick carefully through the staggering amount of information They actively seek wide, deep and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational text that builds knowledge, enlarges experiences and broadens worldviews. They demonstrate cogent reasoning and use evidence that is essential for deliberations and responsible citizenship Create the next generation of K-12 standards All students college and career ready in literacy and mathematics No later than end of high school Build upon the foundation laid by the states Create a vision of what it means to be a literate student in the twenty-first century Students who readily undertake the close, attentive reading that is the heart of understanding and enjoying complex works of literature. Habitually perform the critical reading necessary to pick carefully through the staggering amount of information They actively seek wide, deep and thoughtful engagement with high-quality literary and informational text that builds knowledge, enlarges experiences and broadens worldviews. They demonstrate cogent reasoning and use evidence that is essential for deliberations and responsible citizenship

    3. Common Core State Standards

    4. Common Core Standards Criteria Rigorous Clear and specific Teachable and learnable Measurable Coherent Grade by grade standards Internationally benchmarked Rigor high-level cognitive demands by asking students to demonstrate deep conceptual understanding through the application of content knowledge and skills to new situations. sufficient guidance and clarity so that they are teachable, learnable, and measurable. Teachable and learnable: Provide sufficient guidance for the design of curricula and instructional materials. The standards must be reasonable in scope, instructionally manageable, and promote depth of understanding. The standards will not prescribe how they are taught and learned but will allow teachers flexibility to teach and students to learn in various instructionally relevant contexts. Measureable: Student attainment of the standards should be observable and verifiable and the standards can be used to develop broader assessment frameworks Coherent: The standards should convey a unified vision of the big ideas and supporting concepts within a discipline and reflect a progression of learning that is meaningful and appropriate. Grade-by-grade standards: The standards will have limited repetition across the grades or grade spans to help educators align instruction to the standards. Internationally benchmarked: The standards will be informed by the content, rigor, and organization of standards of high-performing countries so that all students are prepared for succeeding in our global economy and society. Rigor high-level cognitive demands by asking students to demonstrate deep conceptual understanding through the application of content knowledge and skills to new situations. sufficient guidance and clarity so that they are teachable, learnable, and measurable. Teachable and learnable: Provide sufficient guidance for the design of curricula and instructional materials. The standards must be reasonable in scope, instructionally manageable, and promote depth of understanding. The standards will not prescribe how they are taught and learned but will allow teachers flexibility to teach and students to learn in various instructionally relevant contexts. Measureable: Student attainment of the standards should be observable and verifiable and the standards can be used to develop broader assessment frameworks Coherent: The standards should convey a unified vision of the big ideas and supporting concepts within a discipline and reflect a progression of learning that is meaningful and appropriate. Grade-by-grade standards: The standards will have limited repetition across the grades or grade spans to help educators align instruction to the standards. Internationally benchmarked: The standards will be informed by the content, rigor, and organization of standards of high-performing countries so that all students are prepared for succeeding in our global economy and society.

    5. 44 States + DC Have Adopted the Common Core State Standards *Minnesota adopted the CCSS in ELA only

    6. STANDARDS FOR ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS & LITERACY IN HISTORY/SOCIAL STUDIES, SCIENCE, AND TECHNICAL SUBJECTS JUNE 2010

    7. www.corestandards.org

    8. Design and Organization Three main sections K-5 (cross-disciplinary) 6-12 English Language Arts 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

    9. Design and Organization Three appendices A: Research and evidence; glossary of key terms B: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasks C: Annotated student writing samples

    10. Design and Organization Shared responsibilities for students literacy development

    11. Design and Organization Focus on results rather than means Focus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpfulFocus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpful

    12. Design and Organization An integrated model of literacy Focus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpfulFocus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpful

    13. Design and Organization Media skills blended throughout Focus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpfulFocus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpful

    14. Design and Organization K-12 standards Grade-specific end-of-year expectations Developmentally appropriate, cumulative progression of skills and understandings One-to-one correspondence with College Career Anchor standards

    15. Design and Organization Four strands: Reading (including Reading Foundational Skills) Writing Speaking and Listening Language Focus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpfulFocus on achievement leaves room for teachers, curriculum developers and states to determine how those goals should be reached and what additional topics should be taught Teachers are free to provide students with what ever tools their professional judgment and experience identify as most helpful

    16. Reading Design and Organization Three sections: 1. Literature 2. Informational Text 3. Foundational Skills (K-5) Literature: students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each years grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.Literature: students gain adequate exposure to a range of texts and tasks. Rigor is also infused through the requirement that students read increasingly complex texts through the grades. Students advancing through the grades are expected to meet each years grade-specific standards and retain or further develop skills and understandings mastered in preceding grades.

    17. Literary/Informational Text

    18. Reading Framework for NAEP 2009 Standards demand a greater focus on informational text literary non fiction Major focus in 6-12 Standards demand a greater focus on informational text literary non fiction Major focus in 6-12

    19. College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Key Ideas and Details 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. 3. Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.

    20. College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Craft and Structure 4. Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. 5. Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. 6. Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.

    21. College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 7. Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. *8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, including the validity of the reasoning as well as the relevance and sufficiency of the evidence. 9. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Informational textInformational text

    22. College and Career Readiness Standards for Reading Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity 10 .Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.

    23. 23 Best measured by an attentive reader Ability to make an informed decision about the difficulty of a text Knowledge of four factors in developing effective tools: Levels of Meaning or Purpose Reader and Task: Determining whether a given text is appropriate for the student: Cognitive abilities Motivation Topic knowledge Linguistic and discourse knowledge Comprehension strategies Experiences Reading for Understanding, 2002, The RAND Reading Study group Quantitative:Word length or frequency (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level text, Dale-Chall Readability Formula, Lexile) Sentence length Text cohesion (University of Memphis, Coh-Metrix) Measurement tools ( Lexile example Structure Language Conventionality & Clarity Knowledge Demands Best measured by an attentive reader Ability to make an informed decision about the difficulty of a text Knowledge of four factors in developing effective tools: Levels of Meaning or Purpose Reader and Task: Determining whether a given text is appropriate for the student: Cognitive abilities Motivation Topic knowledge Linguistic and discourse knowledge Comprehension strategies Experiences Reading for Understanding, 2002, The RAND Reading Study group Quantitative:Word length or frequency (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level text, Dale-Chall Readability Formula, Lexile) Sentence length Text cohesion (University of Memphis, Coh-Metrix) Measurement tools ( Lexile example Structure Language Conventionality & Clarity Knowledge Demands

    24. Qualitative Measure Levels of Meaning (literary texts) or Purpose (informational texts) Structure Language Conventionality and Clarity Knowledge Demands: Life Experiences (literary texts) Knowledge Demands: Cultural/Literary Knowledge (chiefly literary texts) Knowledge Demands: Content/Discipline Knowledge (chiefly informational texts) Page 6 sheetPage 6 sheet

    25. Quantitative Measures Readability tools: (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level test, Lexile Framework for Reading, Dale-Chall) Use multiple tools

    26. Text Complexity Grade Bands and Associated Lexile Ranges Metametrics has realigned its Lexile ranges to match the Standards text complexity grade bands and has adjusted upward its trajectory of reading comprehension development through the grades Metametrics has realigned its Lexile ranges to match the Standards text complexity grade bands and has adjusted upward its trajectory of reading comprehension development through the grades

    27. Lexile Analyzer http://www.lexile.com/analyzer/

    28. Grade 4 Informational textGrade 4 Informational text

    29. Grade 4 Informational Integration of Knowledge and Ideas 8 Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

    30. Performance Task Students explain how Melvin Berger uses reasons and evidence in his book Discovering Mars: The Amazing Story of the Red Planet to support particular points regarding the topology of the planet. [RI.4.8]

    31. Grade 7 Informational TextGrade 7 Informational Text

    32. Grade 7 Informational Craft and Structure 4. Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of a specific word choice on meaning and tone.

    33. Performance Task Students determine the figurative and connotative meanings of words such as wayfaring, laconic, and taciturnity as well as of phrases such as hold his peace in John Steinbecks Travels with Charley: In Search of America. They analyze how Steinbecks specific word choices and diction impact the meaning and tone of his writing and the characterization of the individuals and places he describes. [RI.7.4] Grade SevenGrade Seven

    34. College and Career Readiness Writing Standards Text Types and Purposes Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

    35. NAEP 2011 Writing Framework

    36. K- argument, The writer of this piecetells the reader the name of the book (in the title of the paper). oMy fabit (favorite) Book is do you Want to be my FRIENDstates an opinion or preference about the book. o. . . my fait (favorite) pot (part) is the hos (horse)K- argument, The writer of this piecetells the reader the name of the book (in the title of the paper). oMy fabit (favorite) Book is do you Want to be my FRIENDstates an opinion or preference about the book. o. . . my fait (favorite) pot (part) is the hos (horse)

    37. Grade 2 ArgumentGrade 2 Argument

    38. Grade 2 ArgumentGrade 2 Argument

    39. Grade 4 argumantGrade 4 argumant

    44. Grade 8 Informative/Explanatory introduces the topic clearly, previewing what is to follow.The writer provides a brief summary of the plot iGrade 8 Informative/Explanatory introduces the topic clearly, previewing what is to follow.The writer provides a brief summary of the plot i

    45. Two key elements of the quotation (destroyed but not defeated) help establish theoverall structure of the piece.oThe second, third, and fourth paragraphs each recount extended examples of Santiagos struggle and determination (e.g., . . . Santiago has gone eighty-four days straight without catching a fish. young Manolins parents will no longer allow the two to fish together, for they do not want their son being exposed any more to this type of failure . . . but Santiago does not let the loss of his friend or the defeat that others see him suffering keep him off the sea. Rather, with bright and shining eyes he thinks maybe today. Every day is a new day.Two key elements of the quotation (destroyed but not defeated) help establish theoverall structure of the piece.oThe second, third, and fourth paragraphs each recount extended examples of Santiagos struggle and determination (e.g., . . . Santiago has gone eighty-four days straight without catching a fish. young Manolins parents will no longer allow the two to fish together, for they do not want their son being exposed any more to this type of failure . . . but Santiago does not let the loss of his friend or the defeat that others see him suffering keep him off the sea. Rather, with bright and shining eyes he thinks maybe today. Every day is a new day.

    48. College and Career Readiness Writing Standards Production and Distribution of Writing Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.

    49. College and Career Readiness Writing Standards Research to Build and Present Knowledge Conduct short, as well as more sustained research projects based on questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

    50. Example/ Science Technical Sample Task A: Evaluating Evidence Compare what the latest science tells us about Genetically Modified food against the arguments for and against Genetically Modified food. Evaluate the hypotheses, data, analysis, conclusions of each side, and including determining the extent to which each side in the debate relied on the available science, argues from an economical perspective, or appeals to the political and emotional concerns. Verify the data and either support or challenge the conclusions with other sources of information. CCSS 11-12 RST.8 Source: Achieve

    51. Example/ Science Technical Sample B Making a claim Read and view different examples of case-making materials related to GM food. Take a position and cite specific textual evidence from your sources, attending to important distinctions each authors makes and to any gaps or inconsistencies in the account. Defend your conclusion from counter-claims Create a presentation of your analysis that highlights key evidence and your strongest claims. CCSS 11-12 RST 1. and RST 9. Source: Achieve

    52. College and Career Readiness Writing Standards Range of Writing Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.

    53. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration 1. Range of conversations and collaborations, diverse partners, building on others ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. 2. Integrate and evaluate information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. 3. Evaluate a speakers point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric.

    54. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Speaking and Listening Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas 4. Present information, findings, and supporting evidence such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning and the organization, development, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 5. Make strategic use of digital media and visual displays of data to express information and enhance understanding of presentations. 6. Adapt speech to a variety of contexts and communicative tasks, demonstrating command of formal English when indicated or appropriate.

    55. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Language Conventions of Standard English When writing or speaking. Use capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. Knowledge of Language To comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Vocabulary Acquisition and Use 4. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, 5. Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings 6. Acquire and use accurately a range of general academic and domain-specific words

    56. Building Analytic Thinking Skills Word analysis appears 57 times in the CCSS with 77 mentions of associated analysis words such as compare and contrast Analysis precursor to high level thinking Lin Kuzmich Stretch Learning Handbook

    57. Analytic Thinking Process What is the purpose of this material? What is a key question that is addressed or needs to be addressed? What is the most important information? What are the main inferences that can be made? What are the key ideas or concepts?

    58. Analytic Thinking Process What are the assumptions the author(s) made in this information, issue, or source What are the implications of this information? What is the main point of view that is presented? Paul,R. and Elder, L. (2003) Analytic Thinking Foundation for Critical Thinking Press (page 23)

    59. Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects

    60. STANDARDS FOR MATHEMATICS JUNE 2010

    61. Characteristics Fewer and more rigorous. Aligned with college and career expectations prepare all students for success upon graduating from high school. Internationally benchmarked, so that all students are prepared for succeeding in our global economy and society. Includes rigorous content and application of higher-order skills. Builds upon strengths and lessons of current state standards. Research based

    62. Coherence Articulated progressions of topics and performances that are developmental and connected to other progressions Conceptual understanding and procedural skills emphasized equally NCTM states coherence also means that instruction, assessment, and curriculum are aligned

    63. Focus Key ideas, understandings, and skills are identified Deep learning of concepts is stressed That is, time is spent on a topic and on learning it well. This counters the mile wide, inch deep criticism leveled at most current U.S. standards.

    64. Clarity and Specificity Skills and concepts are clearly defined Being able to apply concepts and skills to new situations is expected

    66. Mathematics/Standards for Mathematical Practice Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them Reason abstractly and quantitatively Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others Model with mathematics Use appropriate tools strategically Attend to precision Look for and make use of structure Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning 1.Analyze givens, constraints, relationships and goals1.Analyze givens, constraints, relationships and goals

    67. Grade Level Overview All K-8 have critical areas areas that should be emphasized and require more time at the given grade level. This aligns exactly with CFPAll K-8 have critical areas areas that should be emphasized and require more time at the given grade level. This aligns exactly with CFP

    68. Format of K-8 Standards The letters 1.0A separate domainsThe letters 1.0A separate domains

    69. Format of K-8 Standards

    70. Cognitively-Guided Instruction Process

    72. Kindergarten

    76. Common Addition and Subtraction Situations

    77. Common addition and subtraction situations

    78. Compare Addition and Subtraction situations

    79. Common multiplication and division situations

    80. Common multiplication and division situations

    81. Grade 6-8 Ratios and Proportional Relationships (6-7) Number Systems Expressions & Equations Geometry Statistics & Probability Functions (8) multiplication is finding an unknown product, and division is finding an unknown factor in these situations.multiplication is finding an unknown product, and division is finding an unknown factor in these situations.

    82. K-8 Learning Progressions http://commoncoretools.wordpress.com/

    83. HS Pathways 1.) Traditional (US) 2 Algebra, Geometry and Data, probability and statistics included in each course 2.) International (integrated) three courses including number , algebra, geometry, probability and statistics each year 3.) Compacted version of traditional grade 7/8 and algebra completed by end of 8th grade 4.) Compacted integrated model, allowing students to reach Calculus or other college level courses

    85. The second part of the pathways shows the clusters and standards as they appear in the courses. Each course contains the following components: An introduction to the course and a list of the units in the course Unit titles and unit overviews (see below) Units that show the cluster titles, associated standards, and instructional notes (below)The second part of the pathways shows the clusters and standards as they appear in the courses. Each course contains the following components: An introduction to the course and a list of the units in the course Unit titles and unit overviews (see below) Units that show the cluster titles, associated standards, and instructional notes (below)

    86. Number and Quantity Overview Real Number System Quantities Complex Number System Vector and Matrix Quantities

    87. Algebra Overview Seeing Structure in Expressions Arithmetic with Polynomials and Rational Expressions Creating Equations Reasoning with Equations and Inequalities

    88. Functions Interpreting Functions Building Functions Linear, Quadratic and Exponential Models Trigonometric Functions

    89. Modeling Identify the problem Formulate a model Analyze and perform operations Interpret results Validate the conclusion Report on the conclusion

    90. Geometry Congruence Similarity, Right Triangles, and Trigonometry Circles Expressing Geometric Properties with Equations Geometric Measurement and Dimension Modeling and Geometry

    91. Statistics and Probability Interpreting Categorical and Quantitative Data Making Inferences and Justifying Conclusions Conditional Probability and the Rules of Probability Using Probability to Make Decisions

    92. Key Advances Focus and coherence Focus on key topics at each grade level. Coherent progressions across grade levels. Balance of concepts and skills Content standards require both conceptual understanding and procedural fluency. Mathematical practices Foster reasoning and sense-making in mathematics. College and career readiness Level is ambitious but achievable.

    93. Recommended Professional Development Grades K2, Counting and Cardinality and Number and Operations in Base Grades K5 Operations and Algebraic Thinking Grades 35 Number and OperationsFractions Grades 67 Ratios and Proportional Reasoning Grade 8 Geometry

    94. Prepare for this important transition