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Stigma: the impact of prejudice and discrimination on people labeled with mental health disabilities. PowerPoint presented w ith discussions and attendee interaction. By Chuck Hughes.

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stigma the impact of prejudice and discrimination on people labeled with mental health disabilities
Stigma: the impactof prejudice and discrimination on people labeled with mental health disabilities.

PowerPoint presented

with discussions and attendee interaction.

By Chuck Hughes

slide2
We will examine stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination from the perspective of those who are the targets.
this stigma related presentation
This stigma-related presentation

address how prejudice and discrimination affect people with mental health issues, along with steps everyone can take to reduce stigma.

stigma prejudice and discrimination
Stigma: Prejudice and Discrimination.

It’s an ugly, six-letter word that can single-handedly dictate how our life will turn out. Mental health stigma can mean the difference between getting that dream job or remaining unemployed. Between getting that coveted boyfriend or girlfriend or remaining single. It can also mean the difference between remaining in hiding or coming out of the mental health closet.

slide5

Stigmais a mark of disgrace. In mental health it arises from negative stereotyping of consumers. Discrimination is being treated unfairly or denied opportunities. Prejudice arises when an individual or situation is pre-judged, and can lead to public fear, misunderstanding and intolerance.

slide6
People with mental health problems experience prejudice and discrimination in almost every aspect of their lives.

Many have said the stigma of mental health issues are more disabling than the issues itself.

The message that “mental illness is just a disease” isn’t reducing stigma. It’s actually making the stigma worse.

Discussion?

slide7

Everyone who has dealt first-hand with the stigma around mental health likely has a working definition in their mind, but the people at Penn State sum it up quite nicely.

“Stigma refers to negative attitudes (prejudice) and negative behaviour (discrimination) towards people with lived experiences in mental health.”

mental health stigma knows no bounds
Mental health stigma knows no bounds
  • It is constantly on the move. It can catch you in the workplace or in the classroom.
  • It can interfere with making friends and can even interfere with keeping friends.
  • But since stigma has to begin with a negative untrue belief (myth), if we can lessen the untrue belief, we should in theory be able to lessen the discrimination.

Discussion?

common stereotyped beliefs associated with people with mental health care needs
Common stereotyped beliefs associated with people with mental health care needs.
  • Authoritarianism, is the belief that people with mental health care needs are irresponsible and incapable of making decisions, which leads to loss of control and power.
  • Fear and exclusion, or social restrictedness, is the belief that people with mental health care needs should be feared and isolated from communities.

Discussion?

a third common myth
A third common myth
  • The third belief is benevolence, the belief that consumers are ‘innocent and naïve’ and therefore should be cared for. This belief, which can often be seen in how services are provided, is often considered the least harmful.
  • However, these common myths only serve to;
  • Disempowering consumers….
  • Keep us in our places…
  • Forever dependent on the others….
  • Thy bring about low expectation, lack of opportunity in life and greatly hinders recovery.

Discussion?

people fear what they don t understand
People fear what they don’t understand.

International research has demonstrated a clear link between media portrayal and negative attitudes in the public.

FEAR MONGERING

Fact: the proportion of people with mental health care needs likely to display violent behavior is small, with this group significantly more likely to be victims of violence.

slide12

The proportion of people with mental health care needs likely to display violent behavior is small, with this group significantly more likely to be victims of violence.

Inaccurate media portrayal has been shown to have a negative impact on individuals who have had mental health care needs.

.

get involved
Get involved

The best way to challenge these stereotypes is through firsthand contact with people with experience of mental health problems.

Many University Psych Departments. will pay consumer/survivor panel for presentations. All it takes is for some one with lived experience to organize a panel .

making a difference
Making a difference
  • We can each make short videos introducing ourselves, as ordinary people like everyone else....
  • highlighting our accomplishments and contributions to society....
  • in passing mention that we do have mental health issues
  • but that our MH issues (or diagnoses) are not our most defining character
  • By simply talking about it, we dispel some myths and show that we are just like other people.
  • I have a feeling that, eventually, people will start to accept that consumers are people just like them selves.
  • only we have had different experiences than others.

Discussion?

we are not our diagnoses
We are not our diagnoses

Bi-Polar

In the hand out provided you will find two blank sheet of paper; on one write down in big boaled letters the psychiatric labial that the system has pined on you.

After everyone is finished writing; we’ll each stand turning to our left then to our right, tearing up our labels and saying out laud, in our own words. Why we renounce, refuse to acknowledge, reject, disclaim and or disown our labels.

Attention deficiency syndrome

Depressed

Schso- effective

Borderline personality

Psychotic

an exercise in empowerment
An exercise in EmPowerment

In the hand find the secondblank sheet of paper and write 15 things about yourself with out mentioning MH.

Not just affirmations but any attributes and accomplishments, things society appreciates.

After everyone is finished we’ll take turns going around the room reading aloud what we have written.

I am a carpenter, janitor, naturalist, base ball player, hiker, fishermen,……

I am women; I am strong, hear my roar!

7 huge things you can do
7 huge things you can do

To reduce prejudice and discrimination (untrue myths) against people with mental health challenges.

  • Know the facts

Educate ourselves about untrue beliefs that people have about mental health consumers that serves to keep us in our places.

choose your words carefully
Choose your words carefully

Some words are oppressive and others are liberating. Learn which terms portray consumers in an EmPowering manner.

2. The way we speak can affect the way other people think and speak.

  • Use accurate and liberating words when talking about people with mental health problems.
  • For example, speak about “a person with mental health issues” rather than “the mentally ill.”
3 educate others
3. Educate others

Find opportunities to pass on facts and positive attitudes about people with mental health problems.

  • If people or the media present information that is not true, challenge their myths and stereotypes.
  • Let them know what their negative words and incorrect descriptions are and how that affects people with mental health issues.
  • Check local and national news sources and make comments on any articles or op-ins about mental health.
  • keeping hope and recovery from mental health issues ideas alive.
4 focus on the positive
4 Focus on the positive

People with mental health make valuable contributions to society. Their mental problems are just one part of who they are.

  • For example, did you know that Ron Ellis was living with depression when he and the Canadian hockey Toronto Maple Leafs won the Stanley Cup?
  • Or that World Peace of the L.A. Lakers, NBA Champions self identifies as a person with lived experience with mental health issues?

We’ve all heard the negative stories. Let’s recognize and applaud the positive ones.

5 6 support people
5&6. Support people

Treat consumers and survivors as equals

with dignity and respect.

  • 5. But don’t be afraid to use terms like crazy or insane when appropriate. We all use these terms, to not use them in the company of persons with lived experiences is to treat them defiantly. Think about how you’d like others to act toward you if you.
  • 6. If you have family members, friends or co-workers with mental health issues, support their choices and encourage their efforts to recover.
7 know our civil rights
7. Know Our Civil Rights

ADA and the Olmstead decisions; it is against the law for employers and people who provide services to discriminate against people with mental health challenges.

  • Denying people access to jobs, housing and health care, which most take for granted, violates human rights.
  • People with mental health issues have a right to take an equal part in society. Let’s make sure that happens.