K-1 Reading Academy Day 1 Lori Bailey - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  1. K-1 Reading Academy Day 1 Lori Bailey http://miblsi.cenmi.org

  2. Group Expectations • To make this day the best possible, we need your assistance and participation • Be Responsible • Attend to the “Come back together” signal • Active participation…Please ask questions • Be Respectful • Please allow others to listen • Please turn off cell phones and pagers • Please limit sidebar conversations • Share “air time” • Please refrain from email and Internet browsing • Be Safe • Take care of your own needs

  3. Acknowledgements The material for this training day was developed with the efforts of… • Cathy Claes • Melissa Nantais • Soraya Coccimiglio • Courtney Huff • Sonia Lewis Content was based on the work of… • Dr. Anita Archer • Dr. Louisa Moats • The Consortium on Reading Excellence, Inc. (CORE)

  4. Scope and Sequence of the Reading Academy Series Day 1 • Explicit Instruction • Introduction to all elements • Content Elements • Focus on Critical Content – Phonemic Awareness and Alphabetic Principle/Basic Phonics • Delivery Element • Require frequent responses Day 2 • Content and Assignment Review • Explicit Instruction • Content Elements • Focus on Critical Content - Alphabetic Principle/Phonics and Fluency • Scaffolding • Design of Instruction (Instructional Routines) Day 3 • Content and Assignment Review • Explicit Instruction • Content Elements • Critical Content – Vocabulary and Comprehension • Delivery of Instruction and Judicious Review Elements

  5. Intended Outcomes Participants will leave this training with: • An understanding of the benefits of using Explicit Instructional strategies • Knowledge of the Elements of Explicit Instruction • A common understanding of the critical content for kindergarten and first grade reading instruction • An understanding of and plan for requiring frequent responses during reading instruction

  6. Agenda • Welcome, purpose, & intended outcomes • Explicit Instruction • Introduction to the Elements • Content Elements • Focus Instruction on Critical Content – Phonemic Awareness & Alphabetic Principle/Phonics • Sequence Content Logically • Break Complex Skills into Smaller Components • Delivery Elements • Eliciting Frequent Responses • Assignment

  7. Elements of Explicit Instruction http://miblsi.cenmi.org

  8. What is Explicit Instruction? • Explicit instruction is a systematic instructional approach that includes a set of delivery and design procedures derived from effective schools research………. Ideas that Work • …unambiguous and direct approach to teaching that incorporates instruction design and delivery. Archer & Hughes, 2011

  9. Why Explicit Instruction? • ALL students benefit from Explicit Instruction • It is essential for struggling learners • These extremely cost effective strategies, if implemented well, will improve student outcomes, regardless of content area or core program used.

  10. Elements of Explicit InstructionContent 1. Instruction focuses on critical contentSkills, strategies, vocabulary terms, concepts, rules, and facts that will empower students in the future are taught 2. Skills, strategies, and concepts are sequenced logically • Easier skills before harder skills. • High frequency skills before low frequency skills. • Prerequisites first. • Similar skills separated

  11. Elements of Explicit InstructionContent 3. Complex skills and strategies are broken down into smaller (easy to obtain) instructional units Aware of cognitive overloading, processing demands, and capacity of working memory

  12. Elements of Explicit InstructionContent 1. Instruction focuses on ____________ content 2. Skills, strategies, and concepts are ___________ logically 3. Complex skills and strategies are ______________ into smaller (easy to obtain) instructional units

  13. Elements of Explicit InstructionDesign of Instruction Lessons 1. Are organized and focused 2. Begin with a statement of goals 3. Provide review of prior skills and knowledge

  14. Elements of Explicit InstructionDesign of Instruction 4. Provide step-by-step demonstrations 5. Use clear and concise language 6. Provide a range of examples and non-examples 7. Provide guided and supported practice

  15. Elements of Explicit InstructionDesign of Instruction Lessons 1. Are ___________ and focused 2. Begin with a statement of _______________ 3. Provide _______________ of prior skills and knowledge

  16. Elements of Explicit InstructionDesign of Instruction 4. Provide step-by-step __________________ 5. Use __________ and ___________ language 6. Provide a range of ______________ and _______________________________ 7. Provide _______________ and supported practice

  17. Elements of Explicit InstructionDelivery of Instruction Teachers: 1. Require frequent responses 2. Monitor student performance closely 3. Provide immediate affirmation and corrective feedback

  18. Elements of Explicit InstructionDelivery of Instruction Teachers: 5. Deliver instruction at a brisk pace 6. Help students organize knowledge

  19. Elements of Explicit InstructionDelivery of Instruction Teachers: 1. Require frequent _______________ 2. ________________ student performance closely 3. Provide immediate affirmation and corrective ______________________

  20. Elements of Explicit InstructionDelivery of Instruction Teachers: 4. Deliver instruction at a _________ pace 5. Help students ___________ knowledge

  21. Elements of Explicit InstructionPractice Teachers provide judicious practice including: *Initial practice *Distributed practice *Cumulative review

  22. Elements of Explicit InstructionPractice Teachers provide judicious practice including: ______________ practice ______________ practice ______________ review

  23. Content: Focus Instruction on Critical Content http://miblsi.cenmi.org

  24. Focus on the five essential components of effective reading instruction;The Five Big Ideas

  25. What is a “Big Idea?” A Big Idea is: • Predictive of reading acquisition and later reading achievement. • Something we can do something about; something we can teach. • If we teach it, student outcomes will be improved. (If we teach it well & students learn it!)

  26. What are the “Five Big Ideas” of Reading? • Phonemic Awareness • Alphabetic Principle/Phonics • Fluency • Vocabulary • Comprehension

  27. Fluency with Connected Text (Spring, 3rd) Fluency with Connected Text (Spring, 1st) Fluency with Connected Text (Spring, 2nd) Alphabetic Principle (Winter, 1st) Steps for Successful Readers(Roland Good) Probability: On-Track .81 (n=196) We need to have the odds with us! Probability: On-Track .83 (n=246) Probability: Catch-Up .06 (n=213) Probability: On-Track .86 (n=138) Probability: Catch-Up .03 (n=114) Probability: On-Track .64 (n=348) Probability: Catch-Up .22 (n=180) Phonemic Awareness (Spring, Kdg) Probability of remaining an average reader in fourth grade when an average reader in first grade is .87 Probability: Catch-Up .17 (n=183) Probability of remaining a poor reader at the end of fourth grade when a poor reader at the end of first grade is .88 (Juel, 1988)

  28. The Common Core State Standards • These are end of the year outcomes and leave out many skills that must be taught/attained in order for students to achieve the end of year outcome

  29. How do these two fit together?

  30. Road to Reading Words Phonological Awareness Print Awareness (Spoken Language) (Written Language) Awareness of: Ability to Read: Words Phonemes/graphemes Syllables Onset-Rimes Onset-Rimes Syllables Phonemes Words

  31. Phonemic Awareness - Defined The ability to hear, isolate, and manipulate sounds. Under the umbrella of Phonological Awareness, this involves working with the sounds of language at the word and syllable as well as the sound level. Critical skills: Blending and Segmenting

  32. Phonological Awareness rhyme, alliteration, sentence, word, onset-rime, phoneme awareness Phoneme Awareness Ability tohear, identify, and manipulate individual speech sounds Phoneme Blending /s/ /k/ /ă/ /t/ = scat Phoneme Segmentation scat = /s/ /k/ /ă/ /t/

  33. PA Benchmarks Between Ages 4-9

  34. How to Read Curriculum Maps “Big Idea” Skill Outcomes Measurable DIBELS Benchmark Months X Instructional Emphasis

  35. PA Curriculum Map for Kindergarten

  36. PA Curriculum Map for 1st Grade

  37. Activity • Using the Curriculum Maps, review the skill outcomes listed for your grade level. • Compare the Curriculum Map with the Scope and Sequence of PA skills in your core reading materials • Are your core materials aligned with the curriculum maps? • Are there places or skills where the two differ? • If you find differences, make a plan for addressing these differences

  38. General Principles for Teaching PA • Frequent, brief (10-15 minutes), distributed lessons • Two to three activities within each lesson • Keep in mind the goal is phoneme blending/segmenting by first grade • Gradually move through the developmental progression of task dificulty • Oral production of sounds and words is critical • Model, lead, observe (I do one, we do one, you do one) • Give immediate corrective feedback • Incorporate multisensory engagement

  39. Four Favorites • I’ll Say the Sounds • Say It and Move It • Elkonian-Sound Boxes • Fist

  40. I’ll Say the Sound Blending Sounds into Words 1. We’re going to play a say-the-word game. I’ll say the sounds. You say the word. 2. Listen. aaaammmmm 3. What word? am 4. (Repeat with other words.) 5. (If time permits, check individual students.) (Practice: man, sat, ship, trap)

  41. Say-It-and-Move-It This is listening and sound counting not letter recognition Model how to use one finger and how to sweep

  42. Sound Boxes

  43. Fist Segmenting Words into Sounds 1. We’re going to say the sounds in a word. 2. Fist in the air. Put up one finger for each sound. 3. The word is sat. What word? sat 4. First sound? /sss/ Next sound? /aaa/ Last sound? /t/ 5. (If time permits, check individual students.) (Practice: fan, fast, shop, with)

  44. Task: Choose one unit in your core reading materials. Locate the Phonemic Awareness lessons within the unit. Do the lessons align with the suggested principles for PA instruction? If not, how can the lessons be enhanced/changed to make them more effective? Activity Intended Outcome: Participants will evaluate and make improvements on the Phonemic Awareness lessons within one unit of their core reading materials and plan for doing the same with subsequent units if needed.

  45. Alphabetic Principle/Phonics Based on two parts: Alphabetic Understanding. Letters represent sounds in words. S G T A Phonological Recoding. Letter sounds can be blended together and knowledge of letter -sound associations can be used to read/decode words. M A P

  46. Why Alphabetic Principle? • Letter-sound knowledge is prerequisite to word identification. • A primary difference between good and poor readers is the ability to use letter-sound correspondence to decode words. • Letter-sound knowledge can be taught. • Teaching the alphabetic principle leads to gains in reading acquisition/achievement.

  47. When Should the Alphabetic Principle be Taught? Preschool • Familiarity with alphabet & letter sounds Kindergarten • Familiarity with alphabet, letter sounds, beginning blending, decoding simple words First grade • Letter sounds, blends, decoding simple words, reads grade level material accurately

  48. Alphabetic Principle Curriculum MapKindergarten

  49. Alphabetic Principle Map First Grade

  50. 17 Activity • Using the Curriculum Maps, review the skill outcomes listed for your grade level. • Compare the Curriculum Map with the Scope and Sequence of Alphabetic Principle skills in your core reading materials • Are your core materials aligned with the curriculum maps? • Are there places or skills where the two differ? • If you find differences, make a plan for addressing these differences