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Overall reported helpfulness of peer actions. One possible approach. High Harm. Low Harm. Harm Minimisation – steps to move young people in the right direction. Cyber bullying helpful actions. Bullying via your mobile phone Question – Do the messages break any laws?

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Overall reported helpfulness of peer actions

Davis, S. & Nixon, C. (2010). The Youth Voice Project. Retrieved on 22 September 2010 from http://www.youthvoiceproject.com/YVPMarch2010.pdf

one possible approach
One possible approach

High Harm

Low Harm

Harm Minimisation – steps to move young people in the right direction.

cyber bullying helpful actions
Cyber bullying helpful actions
  • Bullying via your mobile phone
  • Question – Do the messages break any laws?
  • Yes – contact the Police
  • No – the below suggestions may help
  • download and print the messages, and / or
  • take a digital photo of the message, including details regarding the sender
  • Take Note:
  • Messages need to fulfill at least one of the following criteria before service provider will take action.
  • Three or more unwelcome calls over a 48 to 120 hour period
  • Unwelcome calls made at consistent and/or regular intervals (e.g., 2am every Wednesday)
  • Ten or more unwelcome calls over a 24 hour period
cyber bullying helpful actions1
Cyber bullying helpful actions
  • Bullying via the internet
  • Save the evidence
  • 2. If the content is illegal contact the Police
  • 3. Inappropriate content, which falls into the categories below, may be reported to the ACMA (Broadcasting Services Act 1992):
  • Content classified as RC or X 18+ (includes child pornography, violence or drug use) OR Content classified R 18+ or MA 15+ and not subject to a restricted access system
  • Note: ACMA does not investigate complaints about content contained in email, instant messages, SMS or MMS, unless it is provided as part of an adult chat service, or a service that specialises in the provision of prohibited or potentially prohibited content. Additionally defamatory content is not investigated.
  • 4. Report through the website reporting function (ie. in Facebook etc)
the move to online counseling
The move to online counseling

Services available include: telephone, email, and web (real-time) counselling.

  • The online medium attracts 93% of young people wanting counseling and support
  • Telephone supports accounts for only 47% of all sessions
  • Counsellors spent an average of:
    • 22 minutes in telephone counselling sessions
    • 57 minutes in web counselling sessions

Kids Helpline (2010). Kids Helpline 2009 Overview. Retrieved on 22 September 2010 from http://www.kidshelp.com.au/upload/22862.pdf

are your students disconnecting
Are your students disconnecting?

More than 56,000 of the 438 474 young people who called Kids disconnected during the mandatory privacy wait message, this represents almost 13% of all callers.

  • Does your school:
  • Ask students how they want to make contact with you?
  • Provide safe places for young people to access support?
  • Know if local public phones are in good working order?
  • Promote a variety of support avenues?
  • Offer a mobile phone number for students to text to should they wish to report a concern?
  • Have an online reporting function within the school portal?

Kids Helpline (2010). Kids Helpline 2009 Overview. Retrieved on 22 September 2010 from http://www.kidshelp.com.au/upload/22862.pdf

possible first steps
Possible first steps…
  • Strong leadership/ethos
  • Clarity among school community about the school’s stance and action on this issue
  • Survey
    • Assess level/type, age groups etc of cyber bullying at home and at school e.g. focus groups, class meetings, surveys
  • Focus on transitions especially to high school
  • Collaborate with other schools to provide consistent cyber bullying prevention information eg similar cyber policies
other possible school responses
Other possible school responses

School expected behaviour policies

- Behaviours associated with cyber bullying / define

- Multiple reporting methods, e.g. online or via email

- Consequences for behaviour occurring outside the school if has adverse effect on student safety and wellbeing at school

- Establish a committee involving students

- Part of school induction, presented in lay terms

other possible school responses1
Other possible school responses

Family education, e.g. family evenings, newsletters

Conducted by students

Information about how to prevent, detect and intervene

Encourage families to discuss internet and adverse consequences e.g. school policy consequences; legal issues; social issues.

School wide family agreement

other possible school responses2
Other possible school responses

Information and communicative technology (ICT) use policy addressing

Access to inappropriate material

Unacceptable communication and communication safety

Unlawful and inappropriate activities

Protection of student personal information

Reporting of cyber bullying

Student / family agreement

year 8 cyber friendly schools curriculum
Year 8 Cyber Friendly Schools curriculum

Module One: What’s This All About?

Module Two: In the Know: The Stats on Bullying

Module Three: Flaming: Just Jokes

Module Four: Your Voice Your Choice

Module Five: Being a Good Mate (BFF)

Module Six: Playing Judge and Jury

Module Seven: In or Out

Module Eight: Reflection

year 9 cyber friendly schools curriculum
Year 9 Cyber Friendly Schools curriculum

Module One: My Online Status

Module Two: Connect, Extend, Challenge

Module Three: Helping me, helping you

Module Four: Cyberships (managing relationships)

Module Five: Reality bites

Module Six: Loading plz wait

Module Seven: Standing by

Module Eight: Who me? Couldn’t be…

DRAFT

other possible school responses3
Other possible school responses

Encourage students to report bullying

- Teachers respond positively and consistently to reports

- Variety of methods available including online/email methods to report bullying

- Teachers and parents skilled such that students/children believe they can help

evidence based approach
Evidence-based Approach

The

Screening

Tool

  • Building capacity for action – committed leadership and organisational support
  • Proactive policies, plans and practices to prevent and manage bullying behaviours
  • Supportive school culture
  • Staff, student and family key understandings and competencies
  • Protective physical environment
  • Collaborative school-family-community partnerships
whole school indicators to reduce bullying
Whole School Indicators to reduce bullying
  • Building capacity for action
  • Committed leadership
  • Resource mobilisation (staff, time, funding, materials)
  • Organisational support
  • Compatible school actions with school community needs
whole school indicators to reduce bullying1
Whole School Indicators to reduce bullying
  • Proactive policies, plans and procedures
  • Proactive policy development and implementation
  • Positive behaviour management approaches
  • Integrated approach to orientation and transition
  • Targeted student and family support
whole school indicators to reduce bullying2
Whole School Indicators to reduce bullying
  • Supportive school culture
  • Effective classroom management
  • Positive whole school ethos
  • Positive peer group influence
whole school indicators to reduce bullying3
Whole School Indicators to reduce bullying
  • Staff, student and family key understandings and competencies
  • Staff professional learning
  • Explicit student learning through the curriculum
  • Effective parent communication
whole school indicators to reduce bullying4
Whole School Indicators to reduce bullying

5. Protective physical environment

  • Physical attributes of the school
  • Supportive school facilities and activities
  • Competent student supervision
whole school indicators to reduce bullying5
Whole School Indicators to reduce bullying

6. Collaborative school-family-community partnerships

  • Strengthening family links
  • Working collaboratively with the wider community and health, education and community service providers