AIR NAVIGATION - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
AIR NAVIGATION PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
AIR NAVIGATION

play fullscreen
1 / 37
AIR NAVIGATION
127 Views
Download Presentation
ahava
Download Presentation

AIR NAVIGATION

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. AIR NAVIGATION Part 3 The 1 in 60 rule

  2. LEARNING OUTCOMES On completion of this unit, you should: • Be able to carry out calculations to determine aircraft distance, speed and time • Understand the principles of vectors and the triangle of velocities to establish an aircraft’s track and ground speed

  3. LEARNING OUTCOMES • Understand the principles of the 1 in 60 rule • Understand the types of compass systems used for air navigation, how they work and their limitations • Know the hazards that weather presents to aviation

  4. Introduction • In modern aircraft it is often necessary to do quick mental calculations to check that the navigational computer is still making sense and that we have not fallen into the garbage in, garbage out trap. • We previously looked at progress along track (DST and ETA); we now need to consider our position across track

  5. First though, a couple of definitions. Track Required The track required is normally the line drawn on the map between the departure airfield and the destination, or from one turning point to another on the route.

  6. Definitions continued Track Made Good If for some reason the aircraft drifts off track and we can establish our position overhead using some unique feature (a pinpoint), then the line joining the departure airfield and the pinpoint is known as the Track Made Good (TMG).

  7. Definitions continued Revised Track From a pinpoint, which is off the track required, we have 2 options. One would be to regain the required track, but more normally we would draw a line from the pinpoint to the next turning point. This is called the revised track.

  8. Definitions Provided • Track Required • Track Made Good (TMG) • Revised Track

  9. 1 in 60 Rule The 1 in 60 rule states that: if an aircraft flies a TMG 1º in error from the required track, then after 60 miles of flying the aircraft will be one mile off the required track.

  10. 1 in 60 Rule - cont This can be proved with trigonometry (SOHCAHTOA) but all you need to know is how to use the triangle.

  11. 10° Track error 10 nm 60 nm Track Required An Example After 60 nm the error is 1 nm for every 1° off track

  12. The 1 in 60 rule holds good for track errors up to 23º beyond that the difference in length of the two tracks (TMG and Track required) becomes too great and the approximation will not work.

  13. Application of 1 in 60 The simplest application of the 1 in 60 rule is when a pinpoint is taken exactly halfway along track.

  14. Pinpoint Closing Angle Track Error B A Revised Track TMG From the diagram above you can see the triangle formed as the aircraft drifts off track is exactly mirrored by the triangle showing the aircraft regaining track. Track Required

  15. Pinpoint B A 12° TMG 6° As the triangles are the same size and shape, it is only necessary to alter heading to the right by twice the track error to ensure that the aircraft reaches point B (assuming the wind remains constant). As the pinpoint is taken halfway along track, the actual distances do not affect the results

  16. Pinpoint 4 20 40 A B The Pinpoint is less than half-way along To solve this problem it is necessary to look at each triangle separately and use the 1 in 60 rule as applied to “similar triangles”.

  17. Pinpoint 4 20 40 A B Triangles are “similar” if they are identical in shape and differ only in size.

  18. Track Angle Error 12° Pinpoint 4 20 40 A B Look at the left hand triangle and how this extends to make a 60 mile triangle. Simple multiplication then shows that if a 20 mile run produces a 4 mile error, a 60 mile run (3 times as far) will give a 12 mile error (3 times as large). Thus the track error angle is 12º.

  19. Track error 4 12° 20 How It’s Done 12 40 The left hand triangle is extended to make the base 60 units long

  20. How It’s Done - Continued Closing angle = 6° 6 4 20 40 The right hand triangle is extended in the same way

  21. Pinpoint 4 20 40 A B Once you understand the method and can do the mental arithmetic, you can then omit the drawing of the triangles

  22. Track Angle Error 12° Putting these figures back into the original problem – using previous slides Closing angle = 6° 4 20 40 A B you can see that the track error angle and the closing angle are added together to give 18, this is the amount that you need to turn right in order to regain track at point B.

  23. Practical Application The 1 in 60 rule is used a great deal in both military and civil flying. Because pinpoints are not always available when we want them, we are often left with awkward numbers that do not lend themselves to mental arithmetic. The solution is to use approximate numbers that are easily handled, either round numbers like 20, 30, 40 or those divisible by 6. Bear in mind that the answer is only needed to whole degrees so ultimate accuracy is unnecessary

  24. Remember also, that once a pinpoint is found, it takes you a measurable time to do the calculations, during which time you are drifting further off track so if you have any rounding up to do, ensure that you turn more than the precise calculation rather than less.

  25. Questions

  26. If an aircraft flies for 60 nm with an error of 1° in its heading, it will be 1 nm from its intended track. This is understood as: a. The vector triangle rule b. The distance/time/velocity rule c. The 1 in 60 rule d. The revised track rule

  27. If an aircraft flies for 60 nm with an error of 12° in its heading, how far will it be from its intended track? a. 1 nm b. 6 nm c. 12 nm d. 60 nm

  28. 16° TMG 4° 8° Pinpoint B A An aircraft when flying from A to B is found to be off track at the pinpoint shown below. The pilot calculates the track error as 8° and the closing angle of 4°. By how much does the pilot need to turn to reach point B? As the triangles are the same size and shape, it is only necessary to alter heading to the right by twice the track error

  29. Pinpoint 12° 8° 4° A B An aircraft when flying from A to B is found to be off track at the pinpoint shown below. The pilot calculates the track error as 8° and the closing angle of 4°. By how much does the pilot need to turn to reach point B? The track error angle and the closing angle are added together to give 18, this is the amount that you need to turn right in order to regain track at point B.

  30. Remember: An aircraft flying from A to B finds that after 30 nm it is 4 nm off track. If it has a further 60 nm to travel by how much does the pilot need to turn to regain the intended track at B? It’s the 1 in 60 rule!! 

  31. a. 4° b. 8° c. 12° d. 14°

  32. 4 nm A B 30 nm 60 nm Here is the diagram Take the triangle on the right

  33. 4 nm A B 30 nm Closing Angle = 4° 60 nm

  34. Now the triangle on the left 4 nm A B 30 nm 60 nm

  35. 4 nm A 30 nm Now the triangle on the left 8 nm Track error = 8° 30 nm 8 nm error here gives a track error of 8° Another 30 nm would give an additional 4nm total of 8nm

  36. Track error = 8° + Closing Angle = 4° Therefore, the pilot needs to turn 12° to the right to get to point B

  37. a. 4° b. 8° c. 12° d. 14°