Download
introduction to n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Introduction to PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Introduction to

Introduction to

130 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Introduction to

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Introduction to Poetry

  2. The basic unit of poetry is the line. Most poems have a structure in which each line contains a set amount of syllables; this is called meter. Lines are also often grouped into stanzas - similar to a paragraph. (2) Couplet: a two line stanza (3) Triplet: a three line stanza (4) Quatrain: a four line stanza (5) Cinquain: a five line stanza Often the lines in a stanza will have a specific rhyme scheme.

  3. Rhyme is when the endings of the words sound the same. Dust of Snow by Robert Frost The way a crow Shook down on me The dust of snow From a hemlock tree Has given myheart A change of mood And save some part Of a day I had rued.

  4. Rhyme scheme is the pattern of rhyming words at the end of each line. They are not hard to identify, but you must look carefully at which words rhyme and which do not. Dust of Snow by Robert Frost The way a crow Shook down on me The dust of snow From a hemlock tree Has given my heart A change of mood And save some part Of a day I had rued. A B A B C D C D

  5. Repetition is the repeating of a sound, word, or phrase for emphasis. Inside Inside the house (I get ready)Inside the car (I go to school)Inside the school(I wait for the bell to ring)

  6. MOST COMMON TYPES OF POEMS • Free Verse (without proper use of rules) • Haiku (3 lines : 5-7-5 syllables) • Limerick (5 lines – AABBA) • Narrative Poem (simple stanzas with refrain) • Sonnets (14 lines with strict rhythmic pattern) • Epitaph (commemorative inscription on a tombstone) • Epic (long serious poems – 5 page poem) • Prose (straightforward ordinary language)

  7. Some might consider the study of poetry old fashioned, yet even in our hurried lives we are surrounded by it: 1) Children's rhymes/lullabiesTwinkle twinkle little star How I wonder what you are 2) Verses from rap/pop songsStarships are meant to fly… Hands up and touch the sky… 3) Commercial jinglesGet your skis shined up, Grab a stick of Juicy Fruit – The taste is gonna move you! Move you up! Move you out! The taste is gonna move you When you pop it in your mouth! AA AA ABCADCD

  8. THREE STEPS TO ANALYZE A POEM 1. READ THE POEM AND ESTABLISH THE RHYME SCHEME. 2. FIND THE FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE IN THE POEM. 3. ESTABLISH THE THEME OR MESSAGE OF THE POEM.

  9. NOTHING GOLD CAN STAY BY ROBERT FROST Nature’s first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leaf’s a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay.

  10. 1. READ THE POEM AND ESTABLISH THE RHYME SCHEME. Nature’s first green is gold, A Her hardest hue to hold. A Her early leaf’s a flower; B But only so an hour. B Then leaf subsides to leaf. C So Eden sank to grief, C So dawn goes down to day. D Nothing gold can stay. D

  11. 2. FIND THE FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE IN THE POEM. Nature’s first green is gold, METAPHOR + ALLITERATION + PERSONIF. Her hardest hue to hold. METAPHOR + ALLITERATION + PERSONIF. Her early leaf’s a flower; PERSONIF. But only so an hour. NONE Then leaf subsides to leaf. REPETITION + IMAGERY So Eden sank to grief, PERSONIF. So dawn goes down to day. ALLITERATION Nothing gold can stay. NONE

  12. 3. ESTABLISH THE THEME OR MESSAGE OF THE POEM. Nature’s first green is gold, SPRING Her hardest hue to hold. SPRING Her early leaf’s a flower; SUMMER But only so an hour. SUMMER Then leaf subsides to leaf. FALL So Eden sank to grief, FALL So dawn goes down to day. WINTER Nothing gold can stay. WINTER nothing, even if it is perfect and beautiful, can last forever.