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Updated: November 3, 2009 PowerPoint Presentation
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Updated: November 3, 2009

Updated: November 3, 2009

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Updated: November 3, 2009

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  1. Updated: November 3, 2009

  2. High School Progress Reports • Purpose and Background • Overview of Progress Reports • Metrics • Peer / City Horizons • Confirmed Changes for the 2008-09 Progress Reports • Calculations of HS Progress Report measures • Appendix – Tools and Resources

  3. School Accountability for NYC schools

  4. Progress Report Guiding Principles • Measure student outcomes as accurately as possible given the different challenges schools face • Ensure that schools can verify and re-create metrics so schools understand how they are measured and how they can improve their performance • Compare school performance to that of “peer schools” (schools serving similar student populations) and all schools Citywide • Be criterion-referenced, not norm-referenced (all schools know their targets, the cut-offs for each grade, and can receive an A if they make significant progress) • Produce outcomes that are not correlated with socioeconomic status, Special Education populations, or other demographic characteristics • Incorporate direct input from parents, teachers, and students

  5. Progress Report Overview • The Progress Report measures: • Longitudinal progress with students (to and beyond proficiency) • Mastery by all students of state learning standards as required by state and federal (NCLB) law • Student attendance in school • Closing of the achievement gap for high need populations • Desired conditions for learning as assessed by hundreds of thousands of parents, teachers, and students • Student readiness for high school (and ultimately) college success • High school graduation and progress toward high school graduation 5

  6. Longitudinal progress to and beyond proficiency is directly related to success in high school and after 93.2% 81.1% 54.7%

  7. Progress Reports have been developed for most general education schools • The first official Progress Reports were released in Fall 2007 (evaluating the 2006-2007 school year) • Elementary/Middle Schools (EMS) • High Schools (HS) • Transfer Schools (HST) • Progress Reports for YABCs and Early Childhood schools have been developed and are currently slotted for the first official release in Fall 2009 (evaluating the 2008-2009 school year) • Progress Reports for other school types, such as D75 and D79, are still under development • Note: The “09 Progress Reports” refer to the Progress Reports that evaluate the 2008-09 school year

  8. An evolving process • After the 2006-07 release, we gathered feedback on the Progress Reports from Principals, parents, CSA, UFT, Panel for Educational Policy, School Support Organizations, and many other parties • Based on this feedback, we made several changes to the Progress Reports for 2007-08 • We also held feedback sessions after the 2007-08 release; however, in an effort to provide stability to schools, only minor modifications were made to the Progress Reports for 2008-09 • Changes for the 2009-2010 release will be announced later this Fall

  9. High School Progress Reports • Purpose and Background • Overview of Progress Reports • Metrics • Peer / City Horizons • Confirmed Changes for the 2008-09 Progress Reports • Calculations of HS Progress Report measures • Appendix – Tools and Resources

  10. Progress Report (page 1) • Three ways of evaluating schools • Progress Report grade • Quality Review score • NYS Education, Federal Accountability Status

  11. Progress Report Categories and Scoring Grade and Overall Score Out of 100 points (front page) School Environment 15 points Additional Credit Up to 15 points Student Progress 60 points Student Performance 25 points Elementary, Middle, and K-8 Schools • Exemplary progress on test scores with high need students • Student progress on ELA and Math test scores (avg. change and % making progress) • Student test scores in ELA and Math (median proficiency and % Level 3/4) • Learning Environment Survey results • Attendance High Schools • Graduation rates (4-year and 6-year) • Learning Environment Survey results • Attendance • Exemplary progress in credit gains with high need students • Credit accumulation • Regents completion and pass rates

  12. High School Progress Reports • Purpose and Background • Overview of Progress Reports • Metrics • Peer / City Horizons • Confirmed Changes for the 2008-09 Progress Reports • Calculations of HS Progress Report measures • Appendix – Tools and Resources

  13. School Community School Environment – Surveys + Attendance School surveys tell us about the learning environment at each school. Survey results contribute 10 points to the Progress Report. Student attendance contributes another 5 points. 1. Academic Expectations 2. Communication 3. Engagement 4. Safety and Respect Parents Teachers Students

  14. EMS Student Performance and Progress • The Progress Report rewards progress for students at all levels of performance Proficiency Ratings Performance levels Scaled scores The City uses a more precise translation to distinguish among students at each performance level The State decides what scaled scores correspond to each performance level (1, 2, 3, or 4) State ELA and Math tests are graded on a scale of 200 to 800 800 Level 4 4.00 – 4.50 Meeting learning standards with distinction Level 3 3.00 – 3.99 Meeting learning standards Proficiency Level 2 2.00 – 2.99 Partially meeting learning standards Level 1 1.00 – 1.99 Not meeting learning standards 200 Same cohorts of students Different cohorts of students

  15. Imagine there are 20 3rd Graders at Gotham Elementary School • 20% (4 out of 20) of the 3rd Graders at Gotham ES are Proficient or Advanced • If all we measured were Student Achievement, this would be the only measurement that would matter (and students 4-6 would be the main focus of attention) 4.50 Level 4 (Advanced) 1 4.00 3.99 2 Level 3 (Proficient) 3 4 3.00 2.99 5 6 Level 2 7 9 10 8 11 12 2.00 1.99 13 14 15 16 Level 1 17 18 19 1.00 20

  16. These 20 students are now 4th Graders at Gotham Elementary School • The following year, when these students are 4th Graders, two more students are Level 3 and now 30% of students are Proficient or Advanced 4.50 Level 4 (Advanced) 1 4.00 3.99 2 Level 3 (Proficient) 3 4 5 6 3.00 2.99 Level 2 7 9 10 8 11 12 2.00 1.99 13 14 15 16 Level 1 17 18 19 1.00 20

  17. Finally, these students become 5th Graders at Gotham Elementary School • When these students are 5th Graders, 30% of students are still scoring at Levels 3 & 4, but… 4.50 1 Level 4 (Advanced) 4.00 3.99 2 4 Level 3 (Proficient) 5 6 3 3.00 2.99 8 9 Some of the students who scored at Level 1 last year improve to Level 2 or within Level 1 Some of the students who scored at Level 2 last year improve within Level 2 Level 2 7 10 13 11 12 2.00 14 15 1.99 18 19 16 Level 1 17 Some of the students who scored at Levels 3 & 4 last year improve even more 1.00 20

  18. HS Student Performance and Progress We measure graduation rates as well as the key performance indicators that track progress toward graduation Year 3 Credits Graduation Year 2 Credits Year 1 Credits + • Advanced Regents Diploma with Honors • Advanced Regents Diploma • Regents Diploma • Local Diploma • GED Regents(completion and pass rates) English Math Science U.S. History Global Studies

  19. High School: Weighted Regents Pass Rates The Weighted Regents Pass Rates measure progress made since the 8th grade ELA, Math, Science, and Social Studies tests Illustrative 100% More weight is given to students with lower proficiency based on the 8th grade New York State tests 90% “Expected” Regents pass rate based on 8th grade proficiency (%) 33% 25% 9 10 1 2 Decile 3.0 4.0 Weight 1.0 1.1

  20. Closing the Achievement Gap The Progress Report rewards schools that close the achievement gap • We award schools “additional credit” for closing the achievement gap with high need populations • Elementary/Middle/K-8 Schools earn additional credit through exemplary gains on State tests with their high need populations • High Schools earn additional credit through exemplary gains based on credit accumulation and Regents results with their high need populations • English Language Learners • Special Education Students • Hispanic Students who are in the Lowest Third Citywide • Black Students who are in the Lowest Third Citywide • Other Students who are in the Lowest Third Citywide 5 NCLB Populations

  21. High School Progress Reports • Purpose and Background • Overview of Progress Reports • Metrics • Peer / City Horizons • Confirmed Changes for the 2008-09 Progress Reports • Calculations of HS Progress Report measures • Appendix – Tools and Resources

  22. Peer groups • A peer group is a group of schools with similar student populations that serve approximately the same grade levels • For elementary and K-8 schools, peer groups are determined based on a comparison of student demographics across schools • For middle schools, peer groups are determined based on a comparison of student performance on ELA and Math test scores • For high schools, peer groups are determined based on a comparison of student performance on ELA and Math test scores as well as student demographics • Peer groups consist of up to 40 schools serving approximately the same grade levels (i.e., elementary schools have only other elementary schools in their peer group; same goes for middle schools, K-8 schools, and high schools) • Each school has a unique peer group (so each school can be in the middle of its peer group)

  23. Comparing results across peer schools and the City Peer Horizon Scores(count 3X – 75%) City Horizon Scores(count once – 25%) • Each school’s performance is compared to the performance of schools in its peer group • The “Peer Horizon” is the range of outcomes achieved by the peer group (i.e., the top and the bottom score in the peer group for each measure) • Each school’s performance is also compared to the performance of all schools Citywide • The “City Horizon” is the range of outcomes achieved by all schools Citywide (i.e., the top and the bottom score in the City for each measure) The Peer Horizon scores count three times as much as the City Horizon scores because we want to emphasize the relative performance of schools with similar student populations.

  24. Example: Attendance (Peer Horizon) School A has an attendance rate of 90% 50% • The attendance rates for schools in School A’s peer group ranged from 85% to 95% • School A scored exactly in the middle between the lowest and highest score in its peer group • Therefore, School A’s Peer Horizon score would be 50% 90% 95% 85% Lowest peer score* Highest peer score* School A’s attendance is 50% of the distance between the lowest and highest scores in its peer group Note: Minimums and maximums are established using +/- 2 standard deviations from the mean

  25. Example: Attendance (City Horizon) School A has an attendance rate of 90% 67% • The attendance rates for all schools Citywide ranged from 80% to 95% • School A scored exactly two thirds of the way from the lowest to the highest score among City schools • Therefore, School A’s City Horizon score would be 67% 90% 95% 80% Lowest City score* Highest City score* School A’s attendance is 67% of the distance between the lowest and highest scores among City schools Note: Minimums and maximums are established using +/- 2 standard deviations from the mean

  26. Example: Attendance Metric (5 points) Your School’s Score: Your School Relative to Peer Horizon: Your School Relative to City Horizon: 90% 50% 67% 85% 95% 80% 95% Peer Min* Peer Max* City Min* City Max* counts for 75% counts for 25% .75 x (.50) + .25 x (.67) = .54 Weighted horizon score .54 x 5 points = 2.7 Total points earned for attendance Note: Minimums and maximums are established using +/- 2 standard deviations from the mean

  27. High School Progress Reports • Purpose and Background • Overview of Progress Reports • Metrics • Peer / City Horizons • Confirmed Changes for the 2008-09 Progress Reports • Calculations of HS Progress Report measures • Appendix – Tools and Resources

  28. Confirmed changes to the High School Progress Report • Weighted Regents Pass Rates for students without 8th grade test scores • Student attendance

  29. Change #1: Weighted Regents Pass Rates for students without 8th grade test scores • These measures award credit to schools for students who pass a Regents exam (with a 65 or higher), where the amount of credit is based on the student’s starting proficiency (i.e., a school receives more credit for helping a lower-performing student pass the exam) • Students are assigned to a “decile” based on their 8th grade proficiency in that subject (in previous years, students without 8th grade test scores were excluded from these measures; see following slides for how we will incorporate these students this year) 100% Illustrative More weight is given to students with lower proficiency based on the 8th grade New York State tests 90% “Expected” Regents pass rate based on 8th grade proficiency (%) 33% 25% 2 1 10 9 Decile Weight 1.0 1.1 3.0 4.0

  30. This year, students with missing 8th grade test scores will be assigned a “decile equivalent” based on their demographics • Each student will be assigned a weight, which is a function of his demographic characteristics • The weights are derived using the following system: • Weight of zero (for English) – not B/H, not Free Lunch, not Special Education, not ELL • Weight of seven (for English) – B/H, Free lunch, Special Education, ELL, SIFE

  31. Probabilities of passing and “decile” weights – English Regents • For students without 8th grade test scores, “decile” points are based on the historical pass rates of each demographic group (represented by students who have the same weight) Illustrative

  32. Probabilities of passing and “decile” weights – Other Regents Illustrative Probability of Passing (based on historical pass rates) “Decile” points

  33. Change #2: Student Attendance • We wanted to ensure that no school’s attendance outcome was adversely affected by the H1N1 virus • Therefore, the 2008-09 Progress Report will only measure attendance up through April 30th, 2009

  34. High School Progress Reports • Purpose and Background • Overview of Progress Reports • Metrics • Peer / City Horizons • Confirmed Changes for the 2008-09 Progress Reports • Calculations of HS Progress Report measures • Appendix – Tools and Resources

  35. Calculations of Progress Report measures • School Environment • Survey scores • Attendance • Student Performance (4-year and 6-year) • Graduation rate • Weighted diploma rate • Student Progress (ELA and Math) • Percentage of students earning 10+ credits (in year 1, year 2, year 3) • Percentage of students in the school’s lowest third earning 10+ credits (in year 1, year 2, year 3) • Average completion rate for remaining Regents • Weighted Regents pass rate (English, Math, Science, U.S. History, Global History)

  36. School Environment (15 points) • Survey scores – same measures as last year; 2.5 points each for four survey categories • Academic Expectations • Communication • Engagement • Safety and Respect • Attendance – the total number of days attended by all students divided by the total number of days on the school’s register for all students (data can be reviewed using the RGAR screen in ATS); includes the attendance for all students on a school’s register at any point during the school year (September through June); 5 points

  37. Student Performance (25 points) • Graduation rates are based on the graduation outcomes of all students in a school’s graduation cohort • The following criteria are used to determine a student’s cohort • General Education students and any Special Education student who is not NYSAA-eligible: these students enter a cohort based on their 9th grade entry year • Special Education students who are NYSAA-eligible: these students enter a cohort upon turning 17 • Students are attributed to the last diploma-granting school they attend prior to June 30th of their 4th year of high school • The 4-year graduation rate reflects the number of students in the school’s 2005 cohort who graduate by August 2009 divided by the total number of students in the school’s 2005 cohort • The 6-year graduation rate reflects the number of students in the school’s 2003 cohort who graduate by August 2009 divided by the total number of students in the school’s 2003 cohort • GEDs and IEP diplomas are not included in the graduation rates, but are included in the weighted diploma rates

  38. Student Performance (25 points) Graduation weights in ‘Weighted Diploma Rates’ Note: any weight in blue is doubled for a Special Education student or student who enters high school two or more years over-age

  39. Student Progress (60 points) – Credits • Credit measures look at the percentage of students in year 1, year 2, and year 3 that earn 10 or more credits in that year (September through August) • Students are attributed to schools on a semester basis using the following criteria • Fall semester – a student must be on a school’s register as of January 1, 2009 • Spring semester – a student must be on a school’s register as of June 1, 2009 • Summer period – a student must be on a school’s register as of June 1, 2009 • If a student is on different school registers as of January 1 and June 1, that student’s outcome (10+ credits?) is shared 50% for each school. If a student is not on a school’s register on either January 1 or June 1, that student is excluded from the measure • For the lowest third measures, students are assigned to the lowest third based on their average ELA and Math 8th grade proficiency. If a student only has one 8th grade test, we use that as the student’s proficiency. If a student does not have an ELA OR Math 8th grade test, that student cannot qualify for the school’s lowest third • Note: “year” is not equivalent to “grade” for these measures. A student who repeats 9th grade would count in the “year 2” measure because it would be the student’s second year of high school • Note: a student who drops out of a high school and does not re-enroll at another high school counts as earning zero credits until he finishes his “4th year”, at which time he is no longer included in the credit measures

  40. Activity – Total credits earned for credit measures Example of credit determinations(from the perspective of school 01M999)

  41. Activity – Total credits earned for credit measures Example of credit determinations(from the perspective of school 01M999)

  42. Activity – Attribution of students for credit measures Example of student attribution and weights for credit measures(from the perspective of school 01M999)

  43. Activity – Attribution of students for credit measures Example of student attribution and weights for credit measures(from the perspective of school 01M999)

  44. Student Progress (60 points) – Regents • The “Average Completion Rate for Remaining Regents” tracks a student’s progress toward passing (with a 65 or higher) the five core subject area Regents exams required for graduation with a Regents Diploma • The five core subject areas are: ELA, Math, Science, U.S. History, and Global History • If a student has already passed a Regents exam subject area, then passing additional exams in that subject area is irrelevant for this measure (i.e., if a student has previously passed the Math A Regents, any additional passes of either the Math A, Math B, or Integrated Algebra exam do not count for this measure) • Students are not included in this measure until they are in their second year of high school • As with credits, students are attributed to a school on a semester basis; if a student is on separate registers as of January 1 and June 1, his contribution to this measure is shared between the two schools (e.g., 50% of the numerator and 50% of the denominator goes to both schools) • Note: a student who drops out of a high school and does not re-enroll at another high school counts as passing zero Regents per year until the end of his “4th year”, at which time he is no longer included in this measure

  45. Student Progress (60 points) – Regents • In general, we look at two pieces of information for each student • The number of Regents exams still needed to pass to graduate with a Regents diploma (a student’s contribution to the denominator) • The number of Regents exams passed in that school year (a student’s contribution to the numerator)

  46. Example #1 – A student’s Regents history for ‘Average Completion Rate’ measure Regents history for one student

  47. Example #2 – A student’s Regents history for ‘Average Completion Rate’ measure Regents history for one student (from perspective of the high school)

  48. Activity – A student’s Regents history for ‘Average Completion Rate’ measure Regents history for one student (from perspective of the high school)

  49. Activity – A student’s Regents history for ‘Average Completion Rate’ measure Regents history for one student (from perspective of the high school)

  50. Student Progress (60 points) – Regents • The “Weighted Regents Pass Rate” measures award credit to schools for students that pass a Regents exam (with a 65 or higher), where the amount of credit is based on the student’s starting proficiency (i.e., a schools receives more credit for helping a lower-performing student pass the exam). If a student’s starting proficiency is not available (i.e., missing 8th grade test score), the amount of credit is based on the student’s demographic characteristics • There is one measure for each of the five Regents subject areas: ELA, Math, Science, U.S. History, and Global History • Deciles are determined separately for all Regents exams (i.e., Chemistry deciles are different than Physics deciles, etc.) • If a student takes the same exam more than once in the school calendar year (January through August administration), the highest exam score is used • If a student has already passed a Regents exam, then passing that same Regents exam again (even with a higher score) or even failing that same Regents exam at a different time is irrelevant for this measure • If a student takes a higher level Regents exam (e.g., Math B, Chemistry) and has already fulfilled the Regents requirement for that subject area (e.g., Math A, Living Environment), the results only count if they are positive (i.e., failing Math B after previously passing Math A does not count in the measure) • As with credits, students are attributed to a school on a semester basis; January Regents are attributed to a school based on the student’s January 1 location; June and August Regents are attributed to a school based on the student’s June 1 location