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teaching and learning physics week 2
Teaching and Learning Physics: Week 2

Objective:

By the end of this class you should be able to describe the importance of teacher/student dialogue to the process of learning. Special attention should be given to the concept of convergent vs. divergent questions and its influence on student learning.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide2

20 minute conversation with Jim

  • Go to your Cornell Google calendar and schedule in a 20 minute slot to sit and have a chat with me. The conversation may include the following topics:
  • What do you think of the seminar so far?
  • What is your level of interest in teaching Physics?
  • How is your TA experience going?
  • Tell me a bit about a teacher that was an important influence in your life.
  • What led you to Cornell?
  • From the floor…
  • Enter your name in the time slot when you schedule so I know who I will be talking to.
  • This conversation will not affect your grade in the seminar.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

thought ignition
Thought Ignition

20th Century & 21st Century Teachers.avi

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide4

The Socratic Method of Learning

"Just what is the Socratic Method, why should we use it, how does it work?"

Just like that!

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide5

Fred and Betty are found dead.

On the floor is broken glass and water.What happened?

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide6

Thus, the Socratic Method is a conversation, a discussion, a time of questioning wherein two or more people assist one another in finding the answers to difficult questions.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide7

Let’s focus on the questions.

In groups of 2-4 come up with a list of questions that you could ask someone about the rock that is given to you. Try to come up with 10-15 solid questions you could ask a student and record them on a piece of paper or in your journal.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide8

Teaching by asking not telling

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide9

Teaching/Learning benefits of Socratic questioning method

  • Ref. www.garlikov.com/Soc_Meth.html
  • Utilizes students innate curiosity and arouses their thinking
  • Makes teaching more interesting
  • Gives constant feedback on student’s understanding
  • No need for tests or quizzes to determine understanding
    • “…..a quiz whose point is teaching, not grading.”
  • Teaching by pulling ideas out of the students instead of pushing ideas in.
  • Immediate correction to misunderstandings
  • Learning environment takes on a “live” nature and not one with passive inefficiency.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide10

Teaching from their questions.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide11

“You can forget facts, but you can’t forget understanding.”

- Prof Eric Mazur

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide12

Challenges to teaching through questioning

  • Very out-of-the-ordinary approach (must train the students).
  • Need to design and think through appropriate probing questions.
  • Must think about the logic of the topic being taught.
  • Need to know students prior knowledge and experiences.
  • Need to put student learning ahead of teacher presentation.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide13

Logically vs Psychologically LEading questions

Logically: Require understanding of the concepts and principles involved in order to be answered correctly.

Psychologically: Can be answered by students’ keying in on clues other than the logic of the content.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide14

Convergent Problem solving (Closed response)

  • Student brings information from a variety of experiences to get the “correct” answer.
  • By definition, the students here are trying to answer the question, “What is…?”.
  • eg.
  • What is Newton’s first Law?
  • What is the the mass of a proton?
  • What is the speed of light?

What is the speed of dark?

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide15

Divergent Problem solving (Open response)

  • Characterized by having no one correct answer. The question is open to various responses.
  • Students are asked, “What do you think…?” questions.
  • eg.
  • “How do you think scientists discovered the speed of light?”

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide16

Knuth and Peressini(Assigned article)

In defining discourse:(Ref. Lotmans. 1988. Text Within Text. Soviet Psychology 24 (1988): 32-51)

(Closed question)

Univocal – characterized by communication win which the listener receives the “exact” message that the speaker intends for the listener to receive.

(Open question)

Dialogic – generates meaning by using dialogue as a “thinking device”.

This is the same thing as convergent and divergent questions. Right?

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide17

TASK:

Develop a set of questions that can help students understand that acceleration due to gravity is 9.81 m/s2 at the top of projectile motion even though the vertical velocity = 0 m/s.

***Remember, you are not trying to get them to say that acceleration never changes. You are trying to get them to understand a very important concept relative to gravity.

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide18

Watch the following video…….

Zero Gravity

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University

slide19

What happens if I drop this cup while water is pouring from the hole in the bottom?

What happens if I toss this cup upward while water is pouring from the hole in the bottom?

Problem 1:

Problem 2:

J. Overhiser/ TIR Cornell University