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  1. Improving the School Nutrition Environment Tanisha D. Belton, MPH student Walden University PUBH 6165-2 Instructor: Dr. Rebecca Heick Winter 2010

  2. Learning Objectives • Understand the problems associated with lack of adequate school nutrition • Policies in place to address the issue • Current programs • Challenges faced • What role can you play?

  3. Introduction • Childhood obesity is a growing problem • 15% of children and teens ages 6 to 19 are overweight • 15% are at risk of becoming overweight Reference: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2004). Overweight Among U.S. Children and Adolescents. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Retrieved on January 20, 2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/databriefs/overwght.pdf

  4. Primary and Secondary School Nutrition • Time for developing dietary habits • Harder to change once in middle school • Children obtain about one-third of their total daily energy requirements at school • Should expend 50% of daily energy expenditure References: Eliassen, E.,Wilson, M. (2007) Selecting Appropriate Elementary Nutrition Education Resources. American Journal of Health Studies, Vol. 22, Issue 4 Metos, J., Nanney, M. (September 2007). The Strength of School Wellness Policies: One State’s Experience. Journal of School Health, Vol. 77, No. 7

  5. Policy Implementation • The Child Nutrition Reauthorization Act (CNRA) of 2004 • Mandated local education agencies to adopt and implement local wellness policies • Limited funding • Not made a priority References : Metos, J., Nanney, M. (September 2007). The Strength of School Wellness Policies: One State’s Experience. Journal of School Health, Vol. 77, No. 7 Stahlberg, A., Howley, N., Luscri, L. (October 2008). A National Snapshot of Local School Wellness Policies. Journal of School Health, Vol. 78, No. 10

  6. Current Programs • Texas Public School Nutrition Policy • Changes in foods served to students • Utah School Districts • 78% followed federal guidelines • 22% did not follow guidelines for competitive foods References: Metos, J., Nanney, M. (September 2007). The Strength of School Wellness Policies: One State’s Experience. Journal of School Health, Vol. 77, No. 7 Cullen, K., Watson, K. (April 2009) The Impact of the Texas Public School Nutrition Policy on Student Food Selection and Sales in Texas. American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 99 No. 4

  7. Challenges • Lack of support • Board members • Administrators • Parents and Students • Limited funding References: Brown, K., McCormack, A., Tabia H., Pitt, S., McDermott, R., Berends, V., Agron, P., Purcell, A. (February 2004) California School Board Members' Perceptions of Factors Influencing School Nutrition Policy: Journal of School Health, Vol. 74, Issue 2 Greves, H.M., Rivara, F. (January 3, 2006). Report card on school snack food policies among the United States' largest school  districts in 2004–2005: Room for improvement. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 3:1

  8. Recommendations for action • Increase the amount of healthy alternatives • Make food accessible and attractive • Encourage increased consumption of fruits & vegetables References: O'Toole, T. P., Anderson, S., Miller, C., Guthrie, J. (October 2007).Nutrition Services and Foods and Beverages Available at School: Results From the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006. Journal of School Health, Vol. 77, Issue 8

  9. Summary • Policies are in place • Support is needed! • Make your voice count!

  10. Further Readings • School Nutrition Association www.schoolnutrition.org • Action for Healthy Kids www.actionforhealthykids.org • US Department of Agriculture (USDA) www.usda.gov • Pennsylvania School Food Service Association www.snapa.org • The Food Trust www.thefoodtrust.org

  11. Thank you!

  12. References Brown, K., McCormack, A., Tabia H., Pitt, S., McDermott, R., Berends, V., Agron, P., Purcell, A. (February 2004) California School Board Members' Perceptions of Factors Influencing School Nutrition Policy: Journal of School Health, Vol. 74, Issue 2 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2004). Overweight Among U.S. Children and Adolescents. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Retrieved on January 20, 2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhanes/databriefs/overwght.pdf Cullen, K., Watson, K. (April 2009) The Impact of the Texas Public School Nutrition Policy on Student Food Selection and Sales in Texas. American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 99 No. 4 Eliassen, E.,Wilson, M. (2007) Selecting Appropriate Elementary Nutrition Education Resources. American Journal of Health Studies, Vol. 22, Issue 4 Greves, H.M., Rivara, F. (January 3, 2006). Report card on school snack food policies among the United States' largest school  districts in 2004–2005: Room for improvement. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 3:1 Metos, J., Nanney, M. (September 2007). The Strength of School Wellness Policies: One State’s Experience. Journal of School Health, Vol. 77, No. 7 O'Toole, T. P., Anderson, S., Miller, C., Guthrie, J. (October 2007).Nutrition Services and Foods and Beverages Available at School: Results From the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2006. Journal of School Health, Vol. 77, Issue 8 Stahlberg, A., Howley, N., Luscri, L. (October 2008). A National Snapshot of Local School Wellness Policies. Journal of School Health, Vol. 78, No. 10