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Explaining Mass Death in the Modern Age. Joseph W.H. Lough, Ph.D. Filosofski fakultet Tuzla Blog: http://www.newconsensus.org/blog Twitter: @jwhlough email: [email protected] phone: +387 603375497. Review.

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Explaining mass death in the modern age
Explaining Mass Deathin the Modern Age

  • Joseph W.H. Lough, Ph.D.

  • Filosofski fakultet Tuzla

  • Blog: http://www.newconsensus.org/blog

  • Twitter: @jwhlough

  • email: [email protected]

  • phone: +387 603375497


Review
Review

  • We live (think, work, play, make love) in a materially and socially integrated, rationally systematic social formation

  • Our social subjectivity – including our critical social subjectivity – is shaped by, reproduces and reinforces the dominant social formation

  • This social formation is socially and historically specific (its universality is actual)


Review1
Review

  • This comprehensive, real, integrated rational system is what we call “capitalism”; a social formation that:

    • accurately measures value throughout the system in terms of abstract units of time

    • compels us to coordinate all our action and thought in terms of abstract value


Preview
Preview

  • What kind of “totality”?

  • What kind of “domination”?

  • What kind of “freedom”?


Preview1
Preview

  • F Hayek – centralized state planning, “planning to plan”

  • K Polanyi – collective protection against the effects of unregulated freedom; the “double movement”

  • T Adorno – a social formation that generates and resolves social pathologies in ways that guarantee their reproduction


Preview2
Preview

  • GWF Hegel Civil Society

    • the universal and the particular

    • the role of education

    • the goal of labor


Gwf hegel
GWF Hegel

  • The particular and the universal

    • both A Smith and GWF Hegel

      • accurately describe the rational totality composed by the market

      • reflect on the insufficiency of markets (A Smith, Th. of M. Sent.)


Gwf hegel1
GWF Hegel

  • The particular and the universal

    • only GWF Hegel explores the central role that power and knowledge play shaping one another . . . in order to avoid the excesses of unregulated self-interest


Gwf hegel2
GWF Hegel

  • The particular and the universal

    • what would happen if all of us actually did pursue only our self-interests?

    • what role does the market play in mediating and moderating self-interest?


Gwf hegel3
GWF Hegel

  • The particular and the universal

    • what must I do in order to return from the market “a success”?

    • GWF Hegel: I must take the interests of “the other” into consideration when marketing my “good”


Gwf hegel4
GWF Hegel

  • The particular and the universal

    • I must step outside of my own particularity


Gwf hegel5
GWF Hegel

  • The particular and the universal

    • but the global market consists of an infinite number of relationships among particularities

    • how can I grasp the interests of the whole?


Gwf hegel6
GWF Hegel

  • What is “the whole” that I grasp when I appreciate its comprehensive, rational integration of all particularity?

  • From what vantage-point can I appreciate this “whole”?


Gwf hegel7
GWF Hegel

  • The goal of labor is to free the human being from the domination of necessity

  • Mechanisation frees human beings to pursue more humane arts and sciences


Hayek polanyi
Hayek & Polanyi

  • Beginning at the End

    • how do prices mediate social relations?

    • what are interventions into the market?

    • what are market distortions?

    • why are they socially and politically disruptive?


Hayek polanyi1
Hayek & Polanyi

  • Beginning at the End

    • what role does the Rule of Law play in the smooth functioning of markets?

    • why might “democratic” intervention in markets prove disruptive?

    • why might local, particular intererests prove disruptive to markets?


Hayek polanyi2
Hayek & Polanyi

  • Beginning at the End

    • when F Hayek objects to rule by committee or by fiat, are his concerns valid?

    • would F Hayek approve of government without public intervention, only in accordance to a system of rules?


Hayek polanyi3
Hayek & Polanyi

  • Beginning at the End

    • was the mediation of social relations by self-regulating markets historically “inevitable”?

    • was the mediation of social relations by self-regulating markets “natural”?

    • to what do we owe the “naturalization” and “normalization” of the rule by markets?


Hayek polanyi4
Hayek & Polanyi

  • P Bourdieu introduces us to two useful concepts:

    • habitude and hence habitus

    • meconnaissance


Hayek polanyi5
Hayek & Polanyi

  • How does F Hayek’s account of the Road to Serfdom illustrate his (and our) habitus?

  • How does F Hayek’s account of the Road to Serfdom illustrate meconnaissance?


Hayek polanyi6
Hayek & Polanyi

  • By what is the totality about which F Hayek warns us composed?

  • Against what does F Hayek wish to protect the self-regulating market?

  • Who (or what) is the “free” agent in F Hayek’s account?


Hayek polanyi7
Hayek & Polanyi

  • According to K Polanyi, what or who mediates social relations prior to the intervention of the state in the 15th and 16th centuries?

  • In what way were the absolute monarchs of the 17th century revolutionaries?


Hayek polanyi8
Hayek & Polanyi

  • How are the peasant revolts (from the 16th c. forwards) “reactionary”?

  • How is the violent suppression of popular unrest (from the 16th c. forwards) “progressive”?


Hayek polanyi9
Hayek & Polanyi

  • Under early capitalism, who came to the aid of the peasants?

  • When did monarchs and prelates shift their focus from protecting society to controling and exploiting society?


Hayek polanyi10
Hayek & Polanyi

  • Can you name any instances in the 20th century when “the public” rebelled against self-regulating markets?

  • Can you name any instances when “the government” intervened to quell public unrest by satisfying their interests?


Hayek polanyi11
Hayek & Polanyi

  • For F Hayek, is there any difference between democratic and non-democratic government?

  • Which, for F Hayek, is more important: the Rule of Law, or democracy?


Hayek polanyi12
Hayek & Polanyi

  • From F Hayek’s vantage-point, what is the cause and primary quality of 20th century totalitarianism?

  • From K Polanyi’s vantage-point, what is the cause and primary quality of 20th century totalitarianism?


Preview3
Preview

  • 17:00-18:30 today; an airing and discussion of Lutz Hachmeister & Michael Kloft’s “Goebbels Experiment”

  • Next Wednesday

    • if capitalism lays at the root of genocide and totalitarianism; and

    • if capitalism survives the war; then

    • how might we grasp the social psychology of social actors in the post-war epoch?


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