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Lust for Life. Irving Stone. Lust for Life(1). Lust for Life is biographical novel of Irving Stone. The dramatic life of Dutch Artist Vincent Van Gough is drawn by the author. This story is based on Van Gough ’ s three volume of letters to his brother Theo (1927-1930). Lust for Life(2).

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Lust for life

Lust for Life

Irving Stone


Lust for life 1
Lust for Life(1)

  • Lust for Life is biographical novel of Irving Stone. The dramatic life of Dutch Artist Vincent Van Gough is drawn by the author. This story is based on Van Gough’s three volume of letters to his brother Theo (1927-1930).


Lust for life 2
Lust for Life(2)

  • The story begins with romanticism of Van Gough at London with Ursula. He was then twenty one and in love for the first time. He thought that time he would be fortunate if he could eat breakfast opposite Ursula for the rest of the days. But it had tragic end. Ursula replied “Do I marry every man that falls love with me. Van Gough got title Red Headed Fool.


Lust for life 3
Lust for Life(3)

  • Van Gough’s next destination was Borinage , a coal mining region , in the south of Belgium. Petit Wesmes was the miners’ village. It could boast of one brick building , the home of Jean Baptist Danis. It was the house Vincent made his way .


Lust for life 4
Lust for Life(4)

  • He started sketching in Borinage coal mines where he simply wanted to record his first impression but his anatomy was all wrong, his proportions were grotesque and his drawing was so outlandish as to be funny. He wanted to copy an old woman carrying hot water on a wintry street. But he could not manage it.


Lust for life 5
Lust for Life(5)

  • He started to enter the miners’s hut carrying drawing paper and crayon. He sketched the children playing in the floor. He sketched Marcasse with its tall chimney , the black fields , the pine wood across the ravine, the peasants ploughing around Paturages but his new hunger was desire to talk with artists. This period he lived for days on dry breads .He was desperate need of money . His younger brother was art dealer. He send his drawing to know why his drawings did not sell. He wanted know how he can make them salable.


Lust for life 6
Lust for Life (6)

  • He went back from figure to his another love color. In Neunan he he painted half ripe corn fields were off a golden tune, ruddy and gold bronze, raised to maximum effect by contrast to broken cobalt tune of the sky.

  • Lastly tragic episode of Rachael. He wanted Racheal as model but he had not five Franc.

  • Instead of five Franc Racheal asked for his ear.


Lust for life 61
Lust for Life (6)

  • Yes, Vincent Van Gough cut his ear with razor and presented it to Racheal.

  • Vincent painted the birds above yellow field of corn and titled it Crows above a corn field.

  • Last page dramatic exit of Van Gough .After getting telegram from Gaachet he caught the first tran for Pontoise,then dashed in a carriage to Auvers.


Lust for life 7
Lust for Life (7)

  • “I am open a tiny gallery of my own , Vincent and my first exhibition will be a one man show. The complete works of Vincent Van Gough..”

  • Vincent turned his head slightly and whispered “I wish I could die now Theo”

  • In a few minutes he closed his eyes.Rousseau, Pere Tanguy, Aurier and Emile Bernard .Six of the men worked putting up the paintings in the wall. Theo stood alone by the coffin.

  • End of a life that refused to bow the convention.


Vicent van gogh

Vicent van Gogh

The Painting Machine


And my aim in my life is to make pictures and drawings, as many and as well as I can; then, at the end of my life, I hope to pass away, looking back with love and tender regret, and thinking, ‘Oh, the pictures I might have made!’”

--van Gogh


Van gogh s growing path
Van Gogh many and as well as I can; then, at the end of my life, I hope to pass away, looking back with love and tender regret, and thinking, ‘Oh, the pictures I might have made!’”’s Growing Path

The Netherlands(1880-1885)

Arles(1888-1889)

Auvers-sur-Oise(1890)

Saing-Remy(1889-1890)

Paris (1886-1888)


Theodorus van Gogh, a preacher in the Dutch Reformed Church, and Anna Cornelia Carbentus, daughter of a bookseller, marry in 1851. Their son Vincent Willem van Gogh, the second of six children, is born on March 30, 1853, in Zundert, a village in Brabant, in the south of the Netherlands. Four years later, in 1857, Vincent's favorite brother, Theodorus (Theo), is born. Vincent begins his education at the village school in 1861, and subsequently attends two boarding schools. He excels in languages, studying French, English, and German. In March 1868, in the middle of the academic year, he abruptly leaves school and returns to Zundert. He does not resume his formal education.


  • In July 1869, Vincent starts an apprenticeship at Goupil & Cie, international art dealers with headquarters in Paris. He works in the Hague at a branch gallery established by his uncle Vincent. From the Hague, in August 1872, Vincent begins writing regular letters to Theo. Their correspondence continues for almost 18 years. Theo accepts a position at Goupil's in January 1873, working in Brussels before transferring to the Hague in November of that year


Vincent moves to the London Goupil branch in June 1873. Daily contact with works of art kindles his appreciation of paintings and drawings. In the city's museums and galleries, he admires the realistic paintings of peasant life by Jean-François Millet and Jules Breton. Gradually Vincent loses interest in his work and turns to the Bible. He is transferred in 1874 to Goupil's Paris branch, where he remains for three months before returning to London. Vincent's performance at Goupil's continues to deteriorate. In May 1875 he is sent again to Paris. He attends art exhibitions at the Salon and the Louvre, and decorates his room with art prints by Hague School and Barbizon artists. In late March 1876 Vincent is dismissed from Goupil's. Driven by a growing desire to help his fellow man, he decides to become a clergyman.


Vincent returns to England in 1876 to teach at a boarding school. In July he is offered a position as a teacher and assistant preacher at Isleworth, near London. On a visit to his parents, Vincent is persuaded not to return to England. Determined to become a minister nonetheless, he moves to Amsterdam in 1877 and attempts to enroll in theology school. When he gives up his preparatory studies, Vincent briefly enters a missionary school near Brussels and in December 1878 leaves for the Borinage, a coal-mining district in southern Belgium, to work as a lay preacher. Vincent lives like a pauper among the miners, sleeping on the floor and giving away his belongings. His extreme commitment draws disfavor from the church and he is dismissed, although he continues to evangelize.


European academic art
European Academic Art school. In July he is offered a position as a teacher and assistant preacher at Isleworth, near London. On a visit to his parents, Vincent is persuaded not to return to England. Determined to become a minister nonetheless, he moves to Amsterdam in 1877 and attempts to enroll in theology school. When he gives up his preparatory studies, Vincent briefly enters a missionary school near Brussels and in December 1878 leaves for the Borinage, a coal-mining district in southern Belgium, to work as a lay preacher. Vincent lives like a pauper among the miners, sleeping on the floor and giving away his belongings. His extreme commitment draws disfavor from the church and he is dismissed, although he continues to evangelize.

  • European art academies offered formal training in the traditional techniques and subjects of historical, mythological, and religious painting. The principal academy in France, the Ecole des Beaux-Arts, admitted students only if they passed a rigorous entrance exam. Students practiced drawing the human figure from plaster casts before they advanced to live models. Lectures on history supplemented lessons in anatomy and perspective. Students did not actually paint at the academy; instead they joined a private studio where painting was taught. The most meaningful accomplishment, for both students and established artists, was acceptance to the Salon, the foremost venue for the exhibition of contemporary art. By the late 19th century, this juried show had grown to mammoth size, peaking at more than 7,000 works in 1880.


Realism
Realism school. In July he is offered a position as a teacher and assistant preacher at Isleworth, near London. On a visit to his parents, Vincent is persuaded not to return to England. Determined to become a minister nonetheless, he moves to Amsterdam in 1877 and attempts to enroll in theology school. When he gives up his preparatory studies, Vincent briefly enters a missionary school near Brussels and in December 1878 leaves for the Borinage, a coal-mining district in southern Belgium, to work as a lay preacher. Vincent lives like a pauper among the miners, sleeping on the floor and giving away his belongings. His extreme commitment draws disfavor from the church and he is dismissed, although he continues to evangelize.

  • Realism in art is an attitude as much as a style. From the mid-19th century, Realist painters rebelled against the art academies and their old-fashioned themes, which seemed increasingly irrelevant in a world newly dominated by science and technology. The Realists reasoned that all meaningful knowledge came from what they could see and directly experience. Instead of depicting aristocrats and myths, they chose ordinary people and events as the subjects of their works. Gustave Courbet, the leader of the movement in art, expressed the Realists' point of view when he declared that he could not draw an angel because he had never seen one.


Impressionism
Impressionism school. In July he is offered a position as a teacher and assistant preacher at Isleworth, near London. On a visit to his parents, Vincent is persuaded not to return to England. Determined to become a minister nonetheless, he moves to Amsterdam in 1877 and attempts to enroll in theology school. When he gives up his preparatory studies, Vincent briefly enters a missionary school near Brussels and in December 1878 leaves for the Borinage, a coal-mining district in southern Belgium, to work as a lay preacher. Vincent lives like a pauper among the miners, sleeping on the floor and giving away his belongings. His extreme commitment draws disfavor from the church and he is dismissed, although he continues to evangelize.

  • Like the Realists before them, the Impressionists chose subjects from daily life. Instead of peasants, however, they painted the leisured members of the Parisian middle class. The transitory effects of light and atmosphere were central to their depictions of boating parties, trips to the seaside, and the cafés and boulevards of Paris. Working quickly, often out-of-doors, the Impressionists used light colors and a flickering, broken brushstroke to express the immediacy of a scene. The major Impressionist figures were August Renoir, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro, Alfred Sisley, Edgar Degas, Mary Cassatt, and Berthe Morisot. Critics initially reviled what they saw as their slipshod technique and unconventional subjects, but by the time Van Gogh first saw their paintings in 1886, the style was gaining acceptance.


The painters boat claude monet 1874 impressionism
The Painters-Boat school. In July he is offered a position as a teacher and assistant preacher at Isleworth, near London. On a visit to his parents, Vincent is persuaded not to return to England. Determined to become a minister nonetheless, he moves to Amsterdam in 1877 and attempts to enroll in theology school. When he gives up his preparatory studies, Vincent briefly enters a missionary school near Brussels and in December 1878 leaves for the Borinage, a coal-mining district in southern Belgium, to work as a lay preacher. Vincent lives like a pauper among the miners, sleeping on the floor and giving away his belongings. His extreme commitment draws disfavor from the church and he is dismissed, although he continues to evangelize.Claude Monet1874Impressionism


Woman with a parasol right claude monet 1886 impressionism
Woman with a Parasol school. In July he is offered a position as a teacher and assistant preacher at Isleworth, near London. On a visit to his parents, Vincent is persuaded not to return to England. Determined to become a minister nonetheless, he moves to Amsterdam in 1877 and attempts to enroll in theology school. When he gives up his preparatory studies, Vincent briefly enters a missionary school near Brussels and in December 1878 leaves for the Borinage, a coal-mining district in southern Belgium, to work as a lay preacher. Vincent lives like a pauper among the miners, sleeping on the floor and giving away his belongings. His extreme commitment draws disfavor from the church and he is dismissed, although he continues to evangelize.(Right)Claude Monet1886Impressionism


This is a characteristic example of an Impressionist painting. Freely applying light, unmixed colors, Monet gave a rapidly executed impression of a quintessentially Dutch landscape of bulb fields and windmills. The painter was apparently delighted by the subject: during his stay in Holland in 1886 he painted - in under ten days - no fewer than five paintings of bulb fields.


Landscape study after nature paul cuizanne 1876 impressionism
Landscape: study after nature painting. Freely applying light, unmixed colors, Monet gave a rapidly executed impression of a quintessentially Dutch landscape of bulb fields and windmills. The painter was apparently delighted by the subject: during his stay in Holland in 1886 he painted - in under ten days - no fewer than five paintings of bulb fields. Paul Cuizanne1876Impressionism


Dance near the mill of galette auguste renoir 1876 impressionism
Dance near the Mill of Galette painting. Freely applying light, unmixed colors, Monet gave a rapidly executed impression of a quintessentially Dutch landscape of bulb fields and windmills. The painter was apparently delighted by the subject: during his stay in Holland in 1886 he painted - in under ten days - no fewer than five paintings of bulb fields. Auguste Renoir1876Impressionism


La danaide auguste rodin 1889 marmer impressionism
La Danaide painting. Freely applying light, unmixed colors, Monet gave a rapidly executed impression of a quintessentially Dutch landscape of bulb fields and windmills. The painter was apparently delighted by the subject: during his stay in Holland in 1886 he painted - in under ten days - no fewer than five paintings of bulb fields. Auguste Rodin1889MarmerImpressionism


  • Wrestling with his desire to be useful, in 1880 Vincent decides he can become an artist and still be in God's service. He writes: "To try to understand the real significance of what the great artists, the serious masters, tell us in their masterpieces, that leads to God; one man wrote or told it in a book; another, in a picture."



Neoimpressionism
Neoimpressionism taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique.

  • The last Impressionist exhibition, held in 1886, witnessed the end of one artistic era and the beginning of another. The show included startling new paintings by Georges Seurat and Paul Signac, artists who would form the core of the Neoimpressionist movement. Seurat hoped to substitute a scientific basis for the intuitive color and casual brushwork of the Impressionists. He studied color theory and devised a systematic method of applying tiny dots of pure color to the canvas. These isolated bits of color were meant to blend in the viewer's eye to produce a coherent image. Called "pointillism" or "divisionism," this painstaking technique was much different from the spontaneous Impressionist approach. Van Gogh did not subscribe to Seurat's color theory-"I often think about his method, and yet I don't follow it at all"-but the Neoimpressionist style helped Vincent find his own distinctive brushstroke of streaks and dashes.


Postimpressionism
Postimpressionism taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique.

  • The late-19th-century artists known as the Postimpressionists did not share a set style or subject. They were a diverse lot, which included Cézanne, Seurat, Redon, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Many of them had experimented with the techniques of Impressionism. But where the Impressionists saw fleeting light, the Postimpressionists looked for underlying structure or color harmonies. They gave birth to movements such as Pointillism, Fauvism, and Symbolism. Their experiments were the first step towards artworks that gave more importance to emotion than to objective reality. This is why they are considered the forerunners of modern art.


Entrance to the harbor honfleurgeorge seurat 1886 post impressionism pointillism
Entrance to the Harbor, HonfleurGeorge Seurat 1886 taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique. Post-Impressionism / Pointillism


Conversation in the meadows paul gaugain 1888 post impressionism
Conversation in the taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique. MeadowsPaul Gaugain1888Post-Impressionism


Gardane paul cuizanne 1885 1886 post impressionism
Gardane taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique. Paul Cuizanne1885 - 1886Post-Impressionism


The mountan sainte victoire and a big pinetree paul cuizanne
The Mountan 'Sainte Victoire taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique. and a big pinetreePaul Cuizanne


The green christ the breton crossing paul gaugain 1889 post impressionism
The Green Christ / taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique. The Breton CrossingPaul Gaugain1889Post-Impressionism


Souvenir of mauve vincent van gogh
Souvenir of Mauve taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique. Vincent vanGogh


Eveningstroll vincent van gogh
Eveningstroll taking painting lessons from his cousin by marriage, Anton Mauve, a leading member of the Hague School. Mauve introduces him to watercolor and oil technique. Vincent van Gogh


In early 1887, Paul Gauguin spent a few months in Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.


Expressionism 1905 present
Expressionism Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists. 1905 - present

  • In the early years of the expressionism (before world war II), the artists built on the ideas of the

    Post-impressionism.


Expressionism 2
Expressionism (2) Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

  • In 1911, the term 'Expressionism' was used for art for the first time. In the beginning the term was used only for the German artists who painted art belonging to this movement from 1905 on. Later other artist were count to this movement as well.


  • Expressionism (3) Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

  • Characteristic for the Expressionism is the way in which the artist tried to express those feelings and interpretations. They did not create scenes reflecting their feelings and interpretations. They did reflect them by the use of forms and colors, often not having any relation to the visible reality at all.


Bathing emma barrera bossi 1911 expressionism
Bathing Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists. Emma Barrera-Bossi1911Expressionism


Der mandrill franz marc 1913 expressionism
Der Mandrill Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists. Franz Marc1913Expressionism


Selfportret with a model ernst kirchner 1910 expressionism die brbcke
Selfportret with a Model Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists. Ernst Kirchner1910Expressionism Die Brbcke


Blue fillies franz marc 1913 expressionism der blaue reiter
Blue Fillies Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists. Franz Marc1913Expressionism Der Blaue Reiter


Analysis of the text
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

fierce / adj. intense, uncontrollably strong

e.g. a fierce effort; a fierce loyalty

fierce pride; fierce pain

a fierce silence

Gee, it was fierce of me!

burn off / v. to destroy by fire; to clear up

e.g. The farmers burnt off the fields.

e.g. It will burn off before noon.


Analysis of the text1
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

encase / vt. Surround or cover sth. with a case (often in passive)

e.g. His broken leg was encased in plaster.

e.g. His feet were encased in his best

leather shoes.

[Word Formation]

Prefix en-

en-+n. = v. enslave encourage

en-+a. = v. enlarge enfeeble

en-+v. = v. Enclose encamp


Analysis of the text2
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

Cf.

Suffix -en

a.+-en = v. deepen sharpen

n.+-en = v. lengthen heighten

n.+-en = a. woolen ashen

tell…from / v. recognize the difference,

distinguish…from…

e.g. tell one twin from the other

e.g. tell natural silk from artificial

ploughland / n. cultivated land, arable land

about 120 acres of land which

8 heads of cattle plough yearly


Analysis of the text3
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

in blossom / bearing blossom

e.g. The apple trees are in blossom.

vicious / adj. brutal; savage

e.g. a vicious killer

the most vicious system

vicious letters

vicious circle

We were chained to a vicious circle

of violence.


Analysis of the text4
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

spring up / v. to appear or come into existence quickly

e.g. Computer stores are springing up all

over the place.

e.g. A fresh wind had sprung up.

at intervals / happening again and again

e.g. at regular intervals

e.g. at weekly intervals

e.g. at monthly intervals

e.g. at quarterly intervals

e.g. at yearly intervals


Analysis of the text5
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

in between / in the space or period of time

separating two points

e.g. The shadows and the spaces in

between the trees were turning from

grey to black.

sparkle / v. glitter; shine

e.g. The lawn outside was sparkling with

frost.

e.g. He is quite different at parties, and

he really sparkles.


Analysis of the text6
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

at the risk of / with the possibility of

doing sth.

e.g. At the risk of seeming callous, I

propose that we go straight to

the football match after the

funeral.

e.g. He saved her at the risk of his

life.


Analysis of the text7
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

swindle / v. cheat sb., esp. in business

e.g. You are easily swindled. (~ + n.)

e.g. I have been swindled out of $5.

(~ sb. out of sth.)

e.g. She swindled $1000 out of the Social

Security. (~ sth. out of sth./sb.)

swindle / n. act of swindling; person or thing

that is wrongly expressed so as

to cheat people

e.g.victims of a tax swindle

e.g. The newspaper story is a complete

swindle.


Analysis of the texr
Analysis of the Texr Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

swindler / n. person who swindles

e.g. The biggest swindler in finance

give up thoughts of / don’t think about

come one’s way / occur or present itself to one

e.g. An opportunity like that doesn’t often come

my way.

vitality / n. physical or mental energy

e.g. The vitality of the movement is threatened.

vital / adj. essential or important to life

e.g. The heart performs a vital bodily function.

adj. essential to the existence of sth.

e.g. Vital information


Daudet
Daudet Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

ALPHONSE DAUDET was born at Nîmes in the south of France on May 13, 1840. His father was an unsuccessful silk manufacturer, and his boyhood was far from happy.

In 1872 he produced the first of his three volumes on the amazing “Tartarin of Tarascon,” probably the most vital of all his creations.

“Tartarin” reappeared in all his buoyancy in “Tartarin sur les Alpes,” and, less successfully as a colonist in “Port-Tarascon.”

He died at Paris on December 17, 1897.

“The Siege of Berlin,”“The Last Class,” and “The Bad Zouave” are not only classics of the art of the short story; they contain the essence of French patriotism


Analysis of the text8
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

stimulating / adj. inspiring new ideas

e.g. The stimulating effect of coffee

stimulus/stimuli /n. sth. that produces a reaction

e.g. to respond to auditory stimuli, etc.

stimulation / n. stimulus

e.g. The stimulation of fierce competition

burn up / v. to destroy by fire

e.g. The satellite had burned up on re-entering the

atmosphere.

deter / v. to discourage or prevent sb. from doing

e.g. The punishment did not deter him.


Analysis of the text9
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

vitalize / v. to fill with life

e.g. to vitalize the patriotism

e.g. to vitalize the progress

Tales of Tartarin by Daudet

stimulant / n. (drink containing) a drug that

increases physical or mental activity

e.g. Coffee and tea are mild stimulants.

e.g. stimulant drugs

(Word formation)

stimulate / v. to encourage to start or progress

further

e.g. To stimulate interest’s in the artist’s works


Analysis of the text10
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

e.g. Failure did not deter him from making

progress.

ooze / v. come or flow out slowly, usually ~ from/out

of sth.

e.g. All the toothpaste had oozed out.

e.g. Their courage was oozing away.

no more … than …/同…一样不…

e.g. He is no more able to read Spanish than I am.

e.g. You are no more capable of speaking Chinese than I am.

e.g. He is no more a good player than I am.

e.g. I am no more satisfied than she is.


Analysis of the text11
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

no less…than…/与…一样(表示同等)

e.g. A dolphin is no less a clever animal than a dog is.

not more…than…./ 不比…更…

e.g. The new edition is not more expensive than the old edition.

e.g. She was not more pleased than I was.

c.f. She was no more pleased than I was.

not less…than… / 不亚于

e.g. She is not less charming than her daughter.


Analysis of the text12
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

no more than / only, at most

e.g. It cost him no more than 10 dollars a week.

e.g. It is no more than a mile to shops.

e.g. She ate no more than a slice of toast for

breakfast.

e.g. The theatre was no more than a painted barn.

no less than / as many (much) as

e.g. There are no less than eight thousand

students in our university.


Analysis of the text13
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

Paragraph 21

…could do without…; …could do without…;

…could do without…; …could do without….

This structure is called Parallelism, which is used to

emphasize something.

Try to find the faulty parallelism in the following:

  • To chew carefully and eating slowly are necessary for good digestion.

  • As time passed, his feeling turned to anxiety, disbelief, and finally becoming deeply concerned


Analysis of the text14
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

3. My job with a travel agency paid well and excitement was provided.

4. I hope either to spend vacation in France or Spain.

5. He is a man of wide experience and very popular with the workers.

6. I am interested in electronics, because it is a new field and which offers interesting opportunities to one who knows science.


Analysis of the text15
Analysis of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

Part 1 (paras 1~2)

Vincent’s daily life, like a blind painting machine.

Part 2 (paras 3~9)

Vincent was drunk with color.

Part 3 (paras 10~17)

Vincent painted hard without paying attention to anything else.

Part 4 (paras 18~19)

Beautiful Nature was the sources of Vincent’s creation.

Part 5 (paras 20~21)

Vincent lived on the power and ability to create.


Summary of the text
Summary of the Text Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

To make the image of painting machine vivid and

full, the writer gives detailed pictures of Vincent’s

daily life and his creation process: he got up early

and returned with finished canvases by evening; he

kept doing the same day by day with beautiful

nature as his sources of creation; he put everything

he experienced in his painting; he was dissatisfied

with himself and what he was painting, with this in

his mind, he went on painting without thinking of food, wife, children, or home; he painted on and on just like a blind painting machine.


Summary writing
Summary Writing Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

Summary and abstract

A summary is an expression of the chief content of

any writing while an abstract is a very concise

summary of the main points of a formal paper ,

esp. an academic one.

To write a summary well, it is important to read the

original carefully to understand the author’s purpose.

Then it is necessary to select the central idea and

its supporting ideas. The next step is to write the

summary in brief form without referring directly to

the original, and the key point is to condense the

above ideas without distorting their rank.


Dictation a
Dictation (a) Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

Visitors to Britain are often surprised to find

that the weather is an almost inexhaustible topic of

conversation. This is not because the British are too

dull to think of anything else to talk about, but

because there is always an element of surprise in

the British climate. In some countries, people can

put away their raincoats for several weeks and let

out their fires during the burning heat of the

summer. Not so in England, where they never know from one day to the next what is in store for them.


Dictation a1
Dictation (a) Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

One year, they had a spell of very hot weather in

early June and Mr. and Mrs. Brown decided to spend

the weekend at the seaside. When everything was in

the car, Mr. Brown drove towards the coast. Not for

long, the sky began to cloud over, and by the time

they arrived, it was dismal and wet. The cold

wind reminded them sharply of winter. They had to

sit round the fire playing indoor games.


Dictation b
Dictation (b) Martinique. This island paradise, with its friendly inhabitants still living close to nature, was the inspiration for many colorful paintings. Although its thin brushstrokes appear to be a legacy of Impressionism, this work is more than a snatched impression of reality. Gauguin drew the imagery for his work from fantasy and his imagination. To convey a particular atmosphere or feeling, he frequently chose colors that diverged from the normal. His work was thus a reaction to Impressionism, whose cardinal principle was to reflect reality as it was visually perceived. For this reason Gauguin is counted as one of the so-called Postimpressionists.

The doctor is making the rounds of the wards. He

asks the patient many questions. But he seems to be

a little hard of hearing. He cannot hear the patient’s

words. So the nurse repeats the patient’s words to

the doctor. The patient wants to know if he is in hospital, if there has been an accident, if he has been badly hurt, and if he will be in hospital long. The doctor answers all his questions. He says that he is in hospital, that there has been an accident, that he has not been badly hurt, and that he will not be in hospital long.


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