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Athletes & Heat stroke. Julia Escamilla - Grade 10. [ Roles & Tasks ] [ Resources ] [ Evaluation ] [ Conclusion ] [ Citations ]. Home

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athletes heat stroke

Athletes & Heat stroke

Julia Escamilla - Grade 10

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[Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Home

The headlines from the sports page were stunning. Korey Stringer, the Minnesota Viking's Pro-Bowl tackle, was dead of heatstroke after collapsing during practice. How could a highly-conditioned professional athlete, supervised by a legion of coaches, trainers, and doctors, die this way? He was only 27.

One week earlier, University of Florida freshman fullback Eraste Autin died six days after collapsing from heatstroke following a workout in Gainesville. When Autin collapsed, the temperature was 88 degrees with 72 percent humidity and a heat index of 102

How can coaches prevent their highly competitive athletes from killing themselves in their quest to be stronger? At what point must coaches and athletes be willing to step back from the code that says quitters never win and winners never quit? In a culture that demands pushing your physical limits to the max, how can tragedies like the deaths of Stringer and Autin be prevented?

Investigate

Read the news release from about Stringer's death

Read the news release from The Orlando Sentinel about Autin's death

You and your group are members of a special task force convened by the National Federation of High School Associations (NFHS). The NFHS is determined to stop further heatstroke deaths in sports. They feel that education of coaches and athletes is the key. You have three tasks:

-Research the causes and symptoms of heatstroke. Identify the risk factors which might contribute to a fatality. Find out how coaches, parents, and athletes can prevent heatstroke.

-Survey local coaches and athletes about their knowledge of heatstroke.

-Produce products that can be used to educate coaches, parents, and players about heatstroke. These materials should emphasize heatstroke prevention and treatment. Your team might be assigned to prepare and deliver a verbal presentation (a video, a skit or a talk) and deliver it to local athletes and coaches. You might create a newsletter, poster, or brochure, using persuasive writing techniques to make an impact and influence attitudes.

Take Action

Click here to see your roles

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Roles & Tasks

Investigate your role by clicking on the appropriate link below:

Physicians: Make yourself an expert on the causes of heatstroke. Find out what happens to the body when it becomes severely overheated. You will investigate risk factors, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatment.

Coaches: Make yourself an expert in heatstroke prevention. What steps must coaches take to prevent heatstroke? Prepare a list of recommended actions that coaches should take to protect athletes.

Investigative Reporters: Research the backgrounds of Korey Stringer and Eraste Autin. Find out what made them special to their family, friends, coaches, and team mates. This information can be used to add emotional impact to the factual information your team will present. Find out about other instances of heat-related death. Create a survey to find out about the attitudes and experiences of local athletes regarding heat-related problems.

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Physicians

Action:

-Read the "questions you might want to consider" below. Brainstorm additional questions. After you do some research, you will probably come up with even more questions.

-Divide the responsibility for finding answers and doing research between group members

-Help each other clarify confusing information. Make sure that each person in the group understands all the information

-Present an overview of your findings to the class orally. All physicians must participate.

-Your teacher will "jigsaw" your class to create teams of three with one physician, one coach, and one investigative reporter on each team. The goal of these teams will be to produce products (newsletters, skits, web pages, posters, etc.) to educate and influence athletes, coaches, and parents. Click here to find out more about the products.

Questions you might want to consider:

-What are the causes and symptoms of heatstroke?

-What risk factors increase the likelihood that someone will suffer from heatstroke

-Are there any medicines that can be used to treat heatstroke?

-Is it true that placing a victim in an ice bath is an effective treatment?

-What organs and systems are affected by heatstroke? What happens to them?

-Is it true that the body can be acclimatized to exertion in the heat?

-What should emergency room personnel do for a heat stroke patient?

-What are some common misconceptions or myths about heatstroke and its prevention?

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Coaches

Action:

-Read the "questions you might want to consider" above. Brainstorm additional questions. After you do some research, you will probably come up with even more questions.

-Divide the responsibility for finding answers and doing research between group members

-Help each other clarify confusing information. Make sure that each person in the group understands all the information

-Present your findings to the class orally. All coaches must participate.

-Your teacher will "jigsaw" your class to create teams of three with one physician, one coach, and one investigative reporter on each team. The goal of these teams will be to produce products (newsletters, skits, web pages, posters, etc.) to educate and influence athletes, coaches, and parents. Click here to find out more about the products.

Questions you might want to consider:

-What steps must coaches take to prevent heatstroke happening to their athletes? Think about what might need to be done during off-season conditioning, during practice, and during games.

-What do measures do professional and college teams have in place to prevent heat stroke?'

-How can coaches get their athletes to admit when they feel too ill to continue?

-What do local coaches do to prevent heat stroke? Is it enough?

-What should be changed (procedures, rules, equipment, supervision, etc.) about what local coaches do?

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Investigative Reporters

Action:-Read the "questions you might want to consider" below. Brainstorm additional questions. After you do some research, you will probably come up with even more questions.-Divide the responsibility for finding answers, doing research, and writing survey questions between group members. -Help each other clarify confusing information. Make sure that each person in the group understands all the information-Create your survey and give it to athletes. -Analyze the results. This will be easier if you make a database of your survey information. -Present your findings to the class orally. All Investigative Reporters must participate.-Your teacher will "jigsaw" your class to create teams of three with one physician, one coach, and one investigative reporter on each team. The goal of these teams will be to produce products (newsletters, skits, web pages, posters, etc.) to educate and influence athletes, coaches, and parents. Click here to find out more about the products.

Questions you might want to consider:-What about Korey Stringer and Eraste Autin made them special to their family, friends, coaches, and team mates? -What other instances of heat-related illness have been in the news? Who was affected?- What areas of the country are most affected? What groups besides athletes are at risk?-What questions can we ask local athletes to determine their attitudes toward training in the heat? Have they ever felt pressured (by coaches, teammates, or their own desire) to keep playing even when they didn't feel well? What were their reasons for playing even after they felt ill? How aware are they that heat stroke can kill? -What kinds of questions should we ask local coaches to determine their attitudes toward and knowledge about heat stroke prevention?

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Products

Newsletter/Brochure for Athletes: Create a newsletter or brochure designed to influence and educate young athletes about the dangers of heat stroke. Make it personal and compelling by incorporating information about Korey Stringer, Eraste Autin, and others who have been hurt or killed by heatstroke. Tell what happens to the body when it becomes severely overheated. Explain the risk factors, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatment. Include a write-up of the survey results obtained by the Investigative Reporter (graphs would be a great touch). Most importantly, explain what steps athletes should take to prevent heatstroke from happening to them. Make sure that your writing is clear and easy to understand as well as accurate. A glossary or list defining some important technical terms would be useful to your audience. Note: You might need two newsletters for athletes; one for middle school/high school age and one for younger athletes.

Create a Skit and Present It: Write a script and act it out. Present the skit at a school assembly, team meeting, or other forum where you can educate athletes, coaches, and parents. Make the skit entertaining and informative. Make sure to convey the necessary information. Tell what happens to the body when it becomes severely overheated. Explain the risk factors, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatment. Plan to include simple costumes and props. Rehearse until your group looks and sounds professional. You might need to recruit other students to play roles. Note: The skit could easily be turned into a video. This would make it easier for many groups to see it.

Create a Multimedia Presentation (and give a talk): Script and deliver a talk about heat stroke. Use PowerPoint or another multimedia authoring program to make slides to accompany your presentation. Explain the risk factors, symptoms, diagnoses, and treatment. Include the survey results obtained by the Investigative Reporter. Most importantly, explain what steps athletes, coaches, and parents should take to prevent heatstroke fatalities. Give this talk to a group of athletes. Note: You might need two presentations for athletes; one for middle school/high school age and one for younger athletes.

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Resources

On this page you’ll find the resources you need in order to complete the tasks assigned to your specific role. Simply click on your role to be redirected to a page with links for you.

Other Resources:Don't overlook the following sources of information:

  • Library books
  • Local experts
  • Other experts (Many of the web sites you will examine offer email links to doctors, trainers, and other experts. Explain your project, prepare a few intelligent questions, and send them off. Hope for a response. These people are very busy, but wouldn't it be cool to get a response from a nationally recognized expert?

COACH

Reporter

PHYSICIAN

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

PHYSICIAN RESOURCES

  • CNN Health: Heatstroke
  • American Academy of Family Physicians
  • EMedicine Articleon heat strokes
  • Heat Acclimatization What people can do to prepare their bodies for exertion when it's hot
  • Dehydration and Heat Injury Explores the connection between too few fluids and heat stroke
  • The Physician and Sports Medicine Information from doctors who specialize in treating athletes
  • Management of Heatstroke and Heat Exhaustion
  • Heat Stroke: Symptoms and Treatment
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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

COACH RESOURCES

  • Heat Acclimatization
  • How to do a fluid balance test
  • NCAA Guidelines for the Prevention of Heat Illness
  • What to Drink for Proper Hydration During Exercise
  • Coach Seiji - Heat Exhaustion And ExertionalHeat Stroke
  • NFHS Offers New Online Course to Minimize Risk of Heat-Stroke Deaths in High School Sports
  • Heat Stroke (Hyperthermia)
  • Heat Stress and Athletic Participation — Health & Safety ...
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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

REPORTER RESOURCES

  • NY Times Article on the Long-Term Effects of Heat Strokes
  • Sports experts devise plan to keep teen athletes safe in heat - Illinois isn't among 7 states to sign on to task force guidelines
  • NFL, UConn Help Found Korey Stringer Institute
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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Evaluation

Click on the links below to see an assessment rubric for that product:

  • Multimedia Presentation Rubric
  • Newsletter/Brochure Rubric
  • Skit Rubric
  • Group Process Rubric
  • Peer Evaluation Rubric
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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Conclusion

You and your team have accomplished a lot! You've researched the causes, effects, and prevention of heatstroke. You've taken action in your community to prevent a heatstroke tragedy from occurring. Now, it's time to reflect:

•What was the most surprising thing you found out?

•If you had to change something about your team's project, what would it be?

•How much of an impact do you think your community presentations will have on young athletes?

•Did local experts like coaches and doctors know a lot about heatstroke?

•What resources were the most helpful? The least?

•How well did your group cooperate?

•What advice would you give to another class doing this project?

•What could be improved about this project?

•Did you enjoy doing this?

Think about the questions above. Add some questions of your own. You will be ready for the debriefing session your teacher will lead.

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Citations

  • Slide 2 Bottom right photo: http://a.abcnews.com/images/GMA/abc_gma_savard_100719_wn.jpg
  • Slide 3 Physician photo: http://www.hmh.net/hmhwebsite/Service.aspx?PageID=66
  • Slide 3 Coach photo: http://i2.cdn.turner.com/money/dam/assets/130215114107-low-pay-jobs-athletic-coach-340xa.jpg
  • Slide 3 Investigative reporter photo: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:HK_Victoria_Park_Now_TV_News_Reporter_2007.JPG
  • Slide 4 Ball photo: http://www.cdc.gov/mrsa/community/team-hc-providers/index.html
  • Slide 4 coach photo: http://www.examiner.com/article/byu-football-a-trainer-s-perspective
  • Slide 4 middle photo: http://www.indstate.edu/news/news.php?newsid=3640
  • Slide 5 center photo: http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org/en/home/athletes/for-athletes/know-your-rights/parent-resources/parent-coach-and-child-the-athletic-triangle
  • Slide 5 right photo: http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2011-07-11/sports/35236950_1_football-coach-wootten-head-coach
  • Slide 5 left photo: http://jezebel.com/5808374/the-brave-new-notion-of-women-coaching-mens-teams
  • Slide 6 center photo: http://ec2-75-101-156-7.compute-1.amazonaws.com/
  • Slide 6 left side photo: http://www.jobsbump.com/2010/11/freelance-sports-reporter-jobs-patch-com/
  • Slide 6 right side photo: http://www.cnn.com/2010/SPORT/07/16/erin.andrews.lawsuit/
  • Slide 7 skit photo: http://www.tecxellenz13.com/?q=node/21
  • Slide 7 newsletter photo: http://www.nl.poweredtemplate.com/brochure-templates/sports/newsletters/01877/0/index.html
  • Slide 7 PowerPoint presentation photo: https://www.boundless.com/communications/preparing-and-using-visual-aids/using-powerpoint-and-alternatives-successfully/overview-of-powerpoint/
  • Slide 8 Physician Photo: http://www.freeldsart.com/physician.htm
  • Slide 8 Coach Photo: http://www.picgifs.com/job-graphics/coach-trainer/
  • Slide 8 Reporter Photo: http://christianreporters.com/write-an-article/
  • Slide 10: Sports photo: http://www.wilson.com/en-au/
  • Slide 10 hydration photo: http://www.bicycling.com/training-nutrition/how-and-when-hydrate

Click here for the continuation of the citations

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[Home] [Roles & Tasks] [Resources] [Evaluation] [Conclusion] [Citations]

Citations

  • Slide 9 Right side photo: http://iufammed.iupui.edu/education/spme-fellowship/
  • Slide 9 Left side photo: http://www.dublinprimarycare.com/services/sports-injuries.html
  • Slide 12 Checklist Photo: http://www.polkcountychristianschool.org/marketplace-craft-fair-vendor-sign-up/clipart-pencil-checklist/
  • Slide 12 Books Photo: http://mrsmitskinisblog.blogspot.com/
  • Slide 12 Evaluation Photo: http://www.advanc-ed.org/issues-in-education/perspectives/worth-investment-strengthening-teacher-evaluation-age-accountabilit
  • Slide 13 Heat Photo: http://vanshali.blogspot.com/2012/06/heat-stroke.html
  • Slide 12 Links:
    • Multimedia Presentation Rubric
    • Newsletter/Brochure Rubric
    • Skit Rubric
    • Group Process Rubric
    • Peer Evaluation Rubric
  • Slide 9 Physician Links:
    • CNN Health: Heatstroke
    • American Academy of Family Physicians
    • EMedicineArticle
    • Heat Acclimatization
    • Dehydration and Heat Injury
    • The Physician and Sports Medicine
    • Management of Heatstroke and Heat Exhaustion
    • Heat Stroke: Symptoms and Treatment