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Gay Burden. Dual Credit & Dual Enrollment Gay Burden, Director Secondary to Post-Secondary Transition. Agenda:. Defining dual credit and dual enrollment Tennessee data (2008-2009) Pros and cons Perkins IV Reserve Grant CTE Competency Attainment Rubric.

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gay burden
Gay Burden

Dual Credit & Dual Enrollment

Gay Burden, Director

Secondary to Post-Secondary Transition

agenda
Agenda:
  • Defining dual credit and dual enrollment
  • Tennessee data (2008-2009)
  • Pros and cons
  • Perkins IV Reserve Grant
  • CTE Competency Attainment Rubric
transition to college the challenge
Transition to college: The Challenge

31% Leave with 0 Credits

68 Graduate HS in 4 Years

18 GraduateCollege in 4 Years

100 Start

9th Grade

40 Start College

27 Start Sophomore Year

31%

Source: Education Weekly March 2005

college for all the ethnicity gap
College for All – The Ethnicity Gap

Percentages by Race and Ethnicity

  • By age 29:
  • 34% of White
  • 18% of African Americans
  • 10% of Hispanic
  • Have bachelor’s degrees

Venezia, A., M. W. Kirst, et al. (2003)

Hoffman, N. (2003)

tennessee dual enrollment grant
Tennessee Dual Enrollment Grant
  • Up to $600 per award year ($300 per semester/$100 per credit hour)
  • Must maintain a 2.75 cumulative college GPA
  • Only for lower-division courses (courses numbered 100-200 or 1000-2000) postsecondary credit for general education courses and courses in disciplines
  • For high school juniors and seniors
cte what do we know
CTE: What do we know?
  • CTE keeps kids in school
  • CTE helps kids focus their PS education plans
  • CTE is an economic benefit to participants and to states
  • CTE-based structures can affect achievement and transition of youth to college and work, and
more transition findings
More Transition Findings
  • CTE students were as likely as their matched non-CTE counterparts to enroll in college in the fall following graduation from high school.
  • CTE students were significantly more likely than their matched non-CTE counterparts to report feeling prepared for the social and academic challenges of college.

Bragg et al, forthcoming

research findings
Research Findings
  • Overall CTE students were significantly more likely than non-CTE students to report that high school had provided them with information on college programs and courses that follow high school course-taking.
    • Bragg et al, forthcoming
research findings1
Research Findings
  • Among dual credit participants, significantly more CTE students compared to non-CTE students attributed their decision to attend college to their participation in dual credit.
    • (Black, 1997; Gurule, 1996; Monroe Community College, 2003; Nitzke, 2002; Richardson, 1999; Spurling & Gabriner, 2002; Windham, 1996)
research findings2
Research Findings
  • Dual credit participants showed better academic performance in college than non-dual credit students.
    • (Black, 1997; Gurule, 1996; Monroe Community College, 2003; Nitzke, 2002; Richardson, 1999; Spurling & Gabriner, 2002; Windham, 1996)
proposed benefits
Proposed Benefits:
  • Facilitating the transition between high school and post-secondary
  • Allowing students to complete a degree faster
  • Reducing costs for a college education
  • Reducing high school drop out rates
  • Preparing students for college work and reducing the need for remedial coursework
  • Enhancing the high school curriculum

(Bailey, Hughes, & Karp, 2003; Blanco, Prescott, &Taylor, 2007; Boswell, 2001; Clark, 2001; Conklin, 2005; Coplin, 2005; Crook, 1990; Education Commission of the States, 2000; Greenberg, 1989; Hoffman, 2005; Karp, Calcagno, Hughes, Jeong, & Bailey, 2007; Johnstone & Del Genio, 2001; Kentucky Interagency Dual Credit Task Force, 2007; Kim, 2006; Kirst & Venezia, 2001; Puyear,

1998)

proposed benefits1
Proposed Benefits:
  • Making more effective use of the senior year in high school
  • Developing the connection between high school and college curricula
  • Raising the student’s motivation and goal to attend college
  • Acclimatizing students to the college environment
  • Freeing space on college campuses
  • Improving relationships between colleges and their communities
  • Easing recruitment of students to college
  • Enhancing opportunities for underserved student populations

(Bailey, Hughes, & Karp, 2003; Blanco, Prescott, &Taylor, 2007; Boswell, 2001; Clark, 2001; Conklin, 2005; Coplin, 2005; Crook, 1990; Education Commission of the States, 2000; Greenberg, 1989; Hoffman, 2005; Karp, Calcagno, Hughes, Jeong, & Bailey, 2007; Johnstone & Del Genio, 2001; Kentucky Interagency Dual Credit Task Force, 2007; Kim, 2006; Kirst & Venezia, 2001; Puyear,

1998)

concerns
Concerns:
  • No solid quantitative data supports the claims of the benefits
  • Low or uncertain academic quality
  • Limited oversight of academic rigor
  • The college course experience is not duplicated in high school courses
  • Capability of high school teachers to teach college level courses
  • Transferability problems

(Andrews, 2001; Bottoms & Young, 2008; Cambra, 2000; Clark, 2001; Johnstone & Del Genio, 2001; Kim, 2006; Krueger, 2006; Lerner & Brand, 2006)

concerns1
Concerns:
  • Costs involved in the programs
  • Potential funding uncertainty
  • Limited access for low-income, minority, and academically underprepared students
  • Lack of policies to ensure students are prepared to begin college level work
  • Liability with underage high school students on college campuses
  • Actions by many interested groups are required

(Andrews, 2001; Bottoms & Young, 2008; Cambra, 2000; Clark, 2001; Johnstone & Del Genio, 2001; Kim, 2006; Krueger, 2006; Lerner & Brand, 2006)

house bill no 99 public chapter no 459
House Bill No. 99Public Chapter No. 459
  • Purpose is to authorize public postsecondary institutions and LEAs to jointly establish cooperative innovative programs.
  • Aimed at removing barriers to dual credit and dual enrollment.
  • Dual Credit Pilot Projects: MTSU
    • Greenhouse Management
    • Introduction to Agribusiness
articulation defined
Articulation Defined:
  • A written agreement based on the process of aligning secondary and post secondary curriculum
  • Awards students post secondary credit
  • 47 statewide articulation agreements exist
scenario a
Scenario A
  • Joe Student is taking a postsecondary course at the high school. He is excited that this course will not only complete his CTE program of study, but it will also give him a jump start at the technical college when he enrolls.
scenario b
Scenario B
  • Jane Student is taking a course taught by the high school teacher and scheduled as a zero period (before the regular school day begins). The high school teacher is also an adjunct professor at the local community college. The student is paying for the course with grant funds.
definitions approved by the p 16 council of tennessee june 2008
Definitions Approved by The P-16 Council of Tennessee June 2008
  • Dual Credit – a postsecondary course or a high school course aligned to a postsecondary course that is taught at the high school by high school faculty for high school credit. Students are able to receive postsecondary credit by successfully completing the course, plus passing the assessment developed and/or recognized by the granting postsecondary institution. The institution will grant the credit upon enrollment of the student.
definitions approved by the p 16 council of tennessee june 20081
Definitions Approved by The P-16 Council of Tennessee June 2008
  • Dual Enrollment – a postsecondary course, taught either at the postsecondary institution or at the high school, by the postsecondary faculty (may be credentialed adjunct faculty), which upon successful completion of the course allows students to earn postsecondary ad secondary credit concurrently. The student must meet dual enrollment eligibility under the TBR and UT policies.
scenario a1
Scenario A
  • Joe Student is taking a postsecondary course at the high school. He is excited that this course will not only complete his CTE program of study, but it will also give him a jump start at the technical college when he enrolls.

Dual Credit

scenario b1
Scenario B
  • Jane Student is taking a course taught by the high school teacher and scheduled as a zero period (before the regular school day begins). The high school teacher is also an adjunct professor at the local community college. The student is paying for the course with grant funds.

Dual Enrollment

what makes it confusing
What makes it confusing…
  • A dual enrollment course in one school could be a dual credit course in another school—it all depends on the arrangement between the post-secondary partner.
secondary data
Secondary data…
  • Dual credit
    • Student
    • Course
    • Pass/fail
  • Dual enrollment
    • Student
    • Course
    • No. credits
    • Post-secondary institution
post secondary data
Post-Secondary data…
  • ..to reflect actual numbers of students and dual credit/dual enrollment credits earned.
post secondary issue
Post-Secondary Issue:
  • Identified by post-secondary educators:
    • TTU
    • UTK
    • MTSU
    • UTM
post secondary issue getting post secondary teachers on board
Post-Secondary Issue: Getting post-secondary teachers on board
  • No common student ID between secondary and post-secondary levels
  • Philosophical idea that college is college and high school is high school
  • How much is too much in terms of no. of credits available for a program area?
  • Teachers are reluctant because of technology (on-line classes; computerized testing)
  • Teachers are reluctant to take on another class because they don’t have the time
  • MTSU requires teachers to attend workshops before teaching dual credit/dual enrollment courses
post secondary issue which to provide dual credit or dual enrollment
Post-Secondary Issue: Which to provide—dual credit or dual enrollment
  • Dual enrollment is more popular than dual credit among post-secondary institutions
  • Any fee for dual credit/dual enrollment courses hard for some students to pay
  • Dual credit courses may not transfer to another post-secondary institution (P/F)
  • If a passing score of 70 is acceptable at one institution, it should be acceptable at other post-secondary institutions.
post secondary issue other issues
Post-Secondary Issue: Other issues
  • Sustainability of programs established with grant funding
  • Secondary computer firewalls have to be dealt with
  • Most secondary schools have better technology than post-secondary schools
  • Courses must have adequate enrollment to make
  • High shool courses have different course titles and numbers than post-secondary
in closing dual credit dual enrollment the tdp
In Closing: Dual Credit, Dual Enrollment & the TDP

GRADUATING WITH DISTINCTION: Attaining a B average and completing at least one of the following:

  • earn a nationally recognized industry certification
  • participate in at least one of the Governor’s Schools
  • participate in one of the state’s All State musical organizations
  • be selected as a National Merit Finalist of Semi-Finalist
  • attain a score of 31 or higher composite score on the ACT
  • attain a score of 3 or higher on at least two advanced placement exams
  • successfully complete the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme
  • earn 12 or more semester hours of transcripted college credit
other topics
Other topics:
  • Perkins IV Reserve Grant
    • $100,000
    • One application per LEA
      • New/innovative CTE programs
      • Dual Credit/Dual Enrollment focus
  • CTE Competency Attainment Rubric
driving student success taking the mystery out of mastery
Driving Student Success: Taking the mystery out of mastery
  • The teaching Roadmap
    • Competency profile
      • Drives lesson plans, teaching strategies, and assessments
      • The students vehicle to success—what they need to know and be able to do
  • The Rubric is the GPS—tells you where you are on the road to success
thank you
Thank you

Gay Burden, Ph.D.

Director, Secondary to Post-Secondary Transition

gay.burden@state.tn.us