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Active Reading Note-Taking Guide. Chapter 5 The Ancient Greeks. Chapter 5, Section 1 The Culture of Ancient Greece (Pages 154-163). Main Idea Setting a Purpose for Reading Think about these questions as you read: • What were the main religious beliefs of the Greeks?

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Active Reading Note-Taking Guide


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    1. Active Reading Note-Taking Guide Chapter 5 The Ancient Greeks

    2. Chapter 5, Section 1The Culture of Ancient Greece(Pages 154-163) Main Idea Setting a Purpose for Reading Think about these questions as you read: • What were the main religious beliefs of the Greeks? • How did Greek art and architecture reflect Greek ideas? p. 89

    3. Chapter 5, Section 1The Culture of Ancient Greece Pages 154-163) Reading Strategy As you read pages 155–159 in your textbook, complete this Venn diagram showing the similarities and differences between an epic and a fable. p. 89 Fable Epic Both • short story • animals talk and act like humans • points out human flaws and strengths ends with a moral • long poem • tells stories of heroic deeds • based in history • Greek stories • taught a lesson

    4. Delphi

    5. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Mythology (Pages 155-156) Terms to Know myth:traditional ancient story dealing with gods, goddesses, or heroes oracle:sacred shrine where a priest or priestess spoke for a god or goddess Epics:these long poems told about heroic deeds; the first epics were the Iliad and Odyssey Fable: a short tale that teaches a lesson p. 90

    6. Terms to Know Drama – drama is a story told by actors who pretend to be characters in the story. Tragedy – in a tragedy, a person struggles to overcome difficulties but fails; as a result, the story has an unhappy ending. Comedy – any drama that has a happy ending.

    7. Greek Gods and Goddesses • Myths: traditional stories about gods and heroes • Used to express people’s religious beliefs • Polytheistic • Gods and goddesses affected everyday life, shaped events, and controlled nature • Lived on Mount Olympus • 12 important gods (pg 155, Demeter is missing!) • Looked and acted like human beings • Followed many rituals (actions carried out in a specific way) • Believed in afterlife

    8. What was a Greek Oracle? • Greeks believed in destiny and prophecy • Many visited the Oracle who would make predictions and prophecies • Most famous: Oracle at Delphi • Story of King Croesus (hahaha!)

    9. Greek Poetry and Fables • Oldest in the Western world • Epics: earliest Greek stories, which were long poems about heroic deeds • Homer wrote the Iliad and the Odyssey • The Iliad: tells the story of the Trojan War • The Odyssey: tells the story of Odysseus after he journeys home from the Trojan War • Greeks believed these stories were real history! • Stories taught courage, honor, loyalty, and love

    10. Who Was Aesop? • Read the three paragraphs on p. 158 under “Who was Aesop?” and answer the question. Determine the main idea from each paragraph. We will compare your answer to mine.

    11. Who Was Aesop? • Greek slave who created fables (stories that teach a lesson) • Most of his fables were funny and had animals that talk (ex: The Tortoise and the Hare) • Had morals (x: Slow and steady wins the race) • Part of Greek oral tradition for 200 years and were written down later

    12. Greek Drama • Drama: stories told by actors who pretend to be characters in the story • Tragedies and comedies • Greek tragedy writers: Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides • Greek comedy writer: Aristophanes • Early tragedies had only one actor • Aeschylus: introduced 2 actors into plays ad wrote Oresteia • Sophocles: used 3 actors and scenery, wrote Oedipus Rex and Antigone • Euripides: more down to earth and real • Aristophanes: made fun of leading politicians and scholars and had jokes

    13. Greek Art and Architecture • Greek artists want people to see reason, moderation, balance, and harmony in their work • Greek paintings on pottery • Architecture (Parthenon) • Used Doric, Ionian, and Corinthian columns • Temples decorated with sculpture

    14. Places To Locate Mount Olympus:the highest mountain in Greece, home to the gods Delphi:location of the most famous Greek oracle, at the Temple of Apollo

    15. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Mythology (Pages 155-156) Sum It Up Why did the Greeks have rituals and festivals for their gods and goddesses? The Greeks believed that the gods and goddesses had the power to affect people’s lives and to shape events. p. 91

    16. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Poetry and Fables (pages 157–158) Summarizing The Odyssey:This is the story of the Greek hero Odysseus and his ten-year journey home from the Trojan War. The Iliad:This is the story of the battle for Troy in which the Greeks hide soldiers in a wooden horse to trick the Trojans and win the war. “The Tortoise and the Hare”:This fable tells the story of a tortoise that wins a race against a hare and teaches the moral that “slow and steady wins the race.” p. 91

    17. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Poetry and Fables (pages 157–158) Terms to Know epic:a long Greek poem that told a heroic story fable:a short story that teaches a lesson People To Meet Homer:Greek poet who wrote the Iliad and the Odyssey Aesop:Greek slave who wrote fables p. 92

    18. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Poetry and Fables (pages 157–158) Academic Vocabulary skip Sum It Up What are the characteristics of a fable? A fable is a short tale that teaches a lesson, animals often have human abilities, it is often funny, it points out human flaws and strengths, and it ends with a moral. p. 92

    19. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Poetry and Fables (pages 157–158)

    20. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Drama (pages 160–161) Connecting Skip Terms To Know drama:a story told by actors who pretend to be characters in the story tragedy:a drama with a sad ending comedy:a drama with a happy ending p. 93

    21. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Drama (pages 160–161) People To Meet Sophocles:Greek general and playwright, best known for his tragedies Euripides:Greek playwright known for his tragedies Academic Vocabulary skip p. 93-94

    22. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Drama (pages 160–161) Sum It Up What two types of drama did the Greeks create? The two types of drama were comedies and tragedies. p. 94

    23. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Art and Architecture (pages 162–163) Synthesizing As you read, find information to answer the first two questions. Then use these answers to respond to the third question below. 1. What beliefs and ideas are reflected in Greek art and architecture? 2. Where do we see examples of Greek architecture today? 3. Synthesize: How has ancient Greece influenced our culture today? p. 94

    24. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Art and Architecture (pages 162–163) Synthesizing As you read, find information to answer the first two questions. Then use these answers to respond to the third question below. • What beliefs and ideas are reflected in Greek art and architecture? reason, moderation, balance, harmony, Perfection, and beauty p. 94

    25. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Art and Architecture (pages 162–163) Synthesizing As you read, find information to answer the first two questions. Then use these answers to respond to the third question below. 2. Where do we see examples of Greek architecture today? in churches and government buildings p. 94

    26. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Art and Architecture (pages 162–163) Synthesizing As you read, find information to answer the first two questions. Then use these answers to respond to the third question below. 3. Synthesize: How has ancient Greece influenced our culture today? Greek ideals in art and architecture are connected with important institutions like the government and church. Today, many of our government buildings and places of worship are some of the most beautiful buildings in the world. p. 94

    27. Chapter 5, Section 1Greek Art and Architecture (pages 162–163) Academic Vocabulary skip Sum It Up What was the most important type of building in ancient Greece? The most important type of building in ancient Greece were temples dedicated to gods and goddesses. p. 95

    28. Chapter 5, Section 1The Culture of Ancient Greece(Pages 154-163) Section Wrap Up What were the main religious beliefs of the Greeks? The Greeks believed that gods and goddesses controlled nature and shaped their lives. p. 95

    29. The Greeks believed that gods and goddesses controlled nature and shaped their lives.

    30. Chapter 4, Section 1The Early Greeks(Pages 116–123) Section Wrap Up How did Greek art and architecture reflect Greek ideas? The art and architecture showed Greek ideals of reason, moderation, balance, harmony, perfection and beauty. p. 95