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Marketing to Moms and Kids. Presented by: Brendan O’Marra, Ryan Partnership July 25th, 2006. Agenda. Marketing – The Simple Definition Family Trends The Moms Market Reaching Moms Understanding Today’s Kids Top Trends Mom/Kid Balance. What is Marketing?. Events. Advertising.

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Marketing to Moms and Kids


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    1. Marketing to Moms and Kids Presented by: Brendan O’Marra, Ryan Partnership July 25th, 2006

    2. Agenda • Marketing – The Simple Definition • Family Trends • The Moms Market • Reaching Moms • Understanding Today’s Kids • Top Trends • Mom/Kid Balance

    3. What is Marketing?

    4. Events Advertising Sampling Consumer Promotion In-Store Activity Coupons Licensing Web Presence Word of Mouth Endorsements Public Relations Brand Management Price Tactics Direct to Home Selling

    5. Behavior Attitude Communication

    6. The Golden Rule of Marketing:Know Your Audience

    7. Definition • Moms are defined in most of this presentation as female parents with children under 18 living in the home. • Another definition of “mom,” used to a lesser extent, is females aged 15-44, or women of childbearing years, as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau. Source: Simmons Data as reported in the Mintel Marketing to Moms Study 2005

    8. Kid Age Segments and Life Stages • Kids are most often defined by their age and life stage – and always aspire up (I’m 5 1/2!). The older they get, the more influence they have.

    9. Moms and Kids:Family Demographics/Dynamics

    10. Family Marketing Trends:Family Environment • 21st Century Families Differ from Predecessors • 1970: 90% were two-parent families • 2002: 70% were two-parent families • 12 million one-parent families • 2 million gay/lesbian HH with children • Unmarried Couples with Children • 1960: 439,000 • 2002: 4,898,000 • Stay-at-Home Moms • 1 in 4 kids under 15 has a stay-at-home mom (10.6MM) • 29 million kids have mom in workforce • Married-couple families with kids have higher incomes Source: Mintel Kids and Teen Eating Habits, 4/06

    11. Family Marketing Trends:Multicultural Families • Population Shows Exceptional Growth • Between 1990 and 2002, Latino kid population grew three times faster than kids population (73.3% vs. 25.5%) • Black and Asian population also increased faster than white kids • “Minority” Kids Will Become Majority by 2020 • Will account for 48% of total kid population • Versus only 38.7 of overall population • Multicultural Kids Live in Larger Families • Nearly 10 million kids have a foreign-born parent Source: Mintel Kids and Teen Eating Habits, 4/0US Census Data6

    12. Family Marketing Trends:Multicultural Families • Economic Status • Asian American kids enjoy highest family income • Multicultural family income remains lower than average • Consumer Behavior • Multicultural parents are more brand conscious • Multicultural families more likely to shop in malls Source: Mintel Kids and Teen Eating Habits, 4/06

    13. ¿Sabe? • 20% of U.S. population under 10 years of age is Latino • Did you know how our target ethnicity breaks out? Source: American Demographics 12/03 – 1/04

    14. Family Marketing Trends:Kids, Parents, and the Media • Parents Impose More Rules over Kids’ TV Watching • Between 1994 and 2000, parents with rules for watching TV rose to 64.4% vs. 54% • Families Skew Certain Networks/Shows • BET, Cinamax, Court TV, Lifetime, Soapnet, TBS • FOX and UPN more popular in kids’ HH • Reality shows also very popular • Family time on the Web • Moms with Internet access now use the Internet twice as much as they watch TV (C&R Research) • 43% of moms say it’s an activity they do with their kids Source: Mintel Kids and Teen Eating Habits, 4/06

    15. Family Marketing Trends:Kids Crunched for Time • Today’s Kids Go To School Earlier • 1970: One in four kids went to nursery school • 2002: 70% of kids spent part of their day in nursery school • Many Kids Are On Their Own after School • 24.5% of kids in 4th-8th grades are on their own for some or all their time after school • Sports Highest on List of After-School Activities • 39% of 4th-8th grade-kids participated in sports after school; 27.1% in lower grades • Family Meals Rare • One in three kids age 6-11 have breakfast with parents • Dinners are more common, although 50%+ do not have dinner with parents every day. Source: Mintel Kids and Teen Eating Habits, 4/06

    16. Family Marketing Trends:Size & Growth of the Market • Family Expenditures Key Component of Kids Market • In 2008, expenditures on 3-12-year-olds will total $175.6 billion, an increase of 16.4% over 2003 • Kids Buying Power Will Top $25 Billion in 2008 • The fastest growth from kids segment • Tweens account for 83% of buying power Source: Zenithmedia Kids and Tweens Strategic Media Resources, 2/05

    17. Moms in the U.S.

    18. Demographics of Moms in the U.S. • There are around 82.5 million moms of all ages in the U.S., accounting for 55% of the total female population in 2005 (Census Bureau definition, which includes women in childbearing years 15-44 and women aged 45+ who have had children). • Women aged 20-35 are considered to be in the prime childbearing age, accounting for 75% of all births. • Women between the ages of 20-39 are responsible for 87% of all births. Source: Mintel: Marketing to Moms Study 2005

    19. Demographics of Moms in the U.S. • Women postponing childbirth • In 2000, the average age for an American woman having her first baby was almost 25, up nearly 4 years from 1970, when the average first-time mom was just 21 years old. • Women are also waiting longer to have a second child — the average age of second-time mothers is 28, up 3.6 years since 1970. Source: Mintel: Marketing to Moms Study 2005

    20. Demographics of Moms in the U.S. • Growth in minority mom populations • The most important change that the mom market is going through is the growth of minority populations, especially Hispanics. The birth rate among blacks, Hispanics, and Asians has exceeded their respective percentage in the total population. • The spending power among minority women has also exhibited a steady increase and is expected to be in the vicinity of $973 billion by 2008. Source: Mintel: Marketing to Moms Study 2005

    21. Demographics of Moms in the U.S. • Single parents vs. married-couple households with children • Married couples with children accounted for a majority (72%) of total households with children. • Single mom and single dad households with children accounted for 22.6% and 5.4%, respectively. Source: Mintel: Marketing to Moms Study 2005

    22. Demographics of Moms in the U.S. • Generations • Baby boomer moms have given rise to the “soccer mom” phenomenon, where moms made efforts to fulfill every expected role of mom and in the process were nicknamed “supermoms.” • Gen X moms tend to be more individualistic, rather than following the stereotypical ideal about parenting, and hence marketers should try not to target Gen X moms with the soccer mom image. • In addition to the size and spending power of Echo Boom moms, they are much more ethnically diverse than other generations of moms. • Moreover, this generation of moms is more likely to put off work to take care of the family. Source: Mintel: Marketing to Moms Study 2005

    23. The Moms Market: The Working Mom • Currently, 70.7 percent of women with children work.1 • In 1975, only two out of every five mothers with a child younger than 6 held a paid job.2 As of 2004, 62.2 percent of women with children under 6 years of age were employed, and 57.3 percent of mothers with children under 3 held jobs.3 • Between 1970 and 1990, the number of single-parent families in the United States doubled, contributing to the greater demand for child care.4 • More women are going back to work sooner after having a child. In 2004, the labor force participation rate for mothers of children younger than a year old was 52.9 percent.5 • Three out of four working mothers work more than 30 hours per week.6 • Over 90 percent of their families use some kind of child care, with children under 5 spending (avg) 36 hours each week in some type of child care arrangement.7,8 Sources: 1U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics. Women in the Labor Force: A Databook. May 2005. (http://www.bls.gov/cps/wlf-databook2005.htm). 2Center for Economic and Policy Research. Working Moms and Child Care. May 2004, 4. 3U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics. Women in the Labor Force: A Databook. May 2005. (http://www.bls.gov/cps/wlf-databook2005.htm). 4U.S. Census Bureau Public Information Office. "Family Composition Begins to Stabilize in the 1990s, Census Bureau Reports." May 28, 1998. (http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/cb98-88.html). 5Bureau of Labor Statistics. Employment Characteristics of Families. 2002. (http://www.bls.gov/news.release/famee.toc.htm). 6Center for Economic and Policy Research. Working Moms and Child Care. May 2004, 4. 7Center for Economic and Policy Research. Working Moms and Child Care. May 2004, 2. 8U.S. Census Bureau (2005), Who's Minding the Kids? Child Care Arrangements: Winter 2002 (Current Population Reports, P70-101).

    24. The Moms Market: Spending Power of Moms • Mothers control 80% of all household spending • Mothers represent $1.6 trillion in spending • Single mothers alone account for $174 billion in spending • Consumers clipped and redeemed 4.6 billion coupons, for a savings of over $3 billion at the register Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media; Association of Coupon Professionals, CMS Trends 2000 Planning Guide

    25. The Moms Market: Balance of Family Life Important to Mom • Balance is an important touch point for mothers • Search for balance includes simplifying one’s life, growing spiritually, or just feeling good • 61% of Americans would be willing to trade money for family time by giving up some pay for more time with children or other family members • 43% of moms have one hour or less of personal leisure time on a typical weekday • Weekends don’t necessarily bring much- needed relief • 64% do what they have to do • 98% do chores around the house and yard • 67% of working moms have not taken a weeklong vacation away from the home within the past year Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    26. The Moms Market: Mom’s Core Values • Focus on One of the Core Messages That Speak to All of Them • Family health and safety • Saving time/convenience • Value • Child enrichment • Balance and simplicity Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    27. The Moms Market:Core Needs of Moms • The prime concern for a mom is the safety and health of her child. As such, moms are typically quite discriminating about information they allow to influence their decisions relating to these. Source: Mintel: Marketing to Moms Study 2005

    28. The Moms Market: Connecting With Moms • Moms Seek Relationships As Consumers • Moms value a company that can change with their life stages and roles • Moms are moved by emotion and an inherent sense of nurturing • Communicate to moms in a way that is real • Remove the “fluff” when speaking to women • Give them facts • Provide buying details that make it easy for them to make a decision Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media: Parent Symposium 2004

    29. The Moms Market: Connecting With Moms • To Connect to Moms, You’ve Got to Walk in Their Shoes – • “You have to remember when you are dealing with mothers that you can’t cut them off at the neck. You have to appeal to their brain as well as their hearts. Their logic is as important as their emotions.” • — Dr. Gail Gross in “Marketing to Moms” Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    30. The Moms Market: Marketing To Moms • Some Advertisers Are Missing the “Mom Mark” • > 75% of mothers report that their needs as mothers aren’t acknowledged, recognized in advertising • > 55% of mothers say they see ads often that send the wrong message to mothers • 30% of mothers say they see ads that offend them Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    31. The Moms Market: Talking to Moms • Radio • Moms drive at least 66 minutes a day • Eight out of 10 moms are radio listeners • Uncluttered airwaves • Content • Entertainment • Opportunities • Custom programming • Information • Solutions Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    32. The Moms Market: Talking to Moms • Online • Seekers, not browsers • Moms go to the Internet seeking solutions (health, parenting, travel, and finance rank high) • 88% rely on the Web for parental guidance and ideas • Moms embrace technology to keep family together (cell phones, e-mail, etc.) • Opportunities • Content distribution • E-newsletters • Content destinations Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    33. The Moms Market: Talking to Moms • “Word of Mom” • Mothers overwhelmingly report they are very likely to purchase a product that a friend recommends • For purchases for home and self, > 55% of moms rely on recommendations … 64% if purchase is for children • Opportunities • Lifestyle behaviors / “virtual communities” • Create sub clubs • Remember your best customers • Walk the talk of your moms • Customer service Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    34. The Moms Market: Talking to Moms • Public Relations • Capture the attention of moms with newsworthy events • Tie-in to causes (especially child related causes) • Magazines • Moms read on average 3.1 magazines a month • Long shelf life • Content vs. ads • Two titles home-delivered monthly Sources: Mom Power 2004; BSM Media

    35. The Kids Market

    36. The Kids Market: Population • 73 million kids <18 in the U.S. (25% of U.S. and growing) • About 20 million kids in each age group: 0-4, 5-9, 10-14 • One-third of kids 2-11 are African-American, Hispanic, or Asian • 1/5th of U.S. population <10 is Hispanic Population of Kids 3-12 Will Remain Flat through 2008 • Baby boomlet will turn tables after 2010 • Biggest growth among 0-4-year-olds • 2.2 million more toddlers • 841,000 fewer 10-14-year-olds Source: U.S. Census

    37. You Need to Stay On Your Toes! • The typical kid brand with a 6-9-year-old core user group loses 25% each year: • 9-year-olds –> 10-year-olds (-25%) • 5-year-olds –> 6-year-olds (+25%) • Implication: • Constantly reintroduce the brand in ads/promotions—keep it fresh and relevant as target group changes over. Core User Group Kids 6 – 9 +25% -25% 5 yrs 6 yrs 7 yrs 8 yrs 9 yrs 10 yrs

    38. Industry Age Segmentation Profiles for Kids Sources: Mintel June 2002, Nickelodeon Magazine, Research Presentation April 2003 2003 Yankelovich, Inc. Kids Rock February 2001; Youth Market Alert Aril 2002

    39. Kids Attitude Toward Moms • Toddlers: 0-2 • Rely on mom/parents • Kids: 3-8 • Close to mom/parents • Tweens: 9-12 • Separating from mom/parents • Young Teens: 13-15 • Trapped by mom/parents • Teens: 16-18 • Free from mom/parents Source: Mintel Kids and Teen Eating Habits, 4/06

    40. Mattel Toys Age Segmentation • Mattel segments its portfolio of brands by age and markets them accordingly. • Within each group, Mattel further refines its offerings by leveraging play-pattern insights. 6-8 yrs Barbie Lifestyle Diva Starz Tyco Radio Control 3-5 yrs Barbie Matchbox Hot Wheels 9-12 yrs Games Interactive Birth-2 yrs Fisher Price Preschool Toys

    41. Nickelodeon Age Segmentation • Nickelodeon’s Kids Portfolio is segmented with specific product designed and marketed by age group 6-8 yrs Nick Nick.com Nick.kids.us 3-5 yrs NickJr NickJr.com NickJr.kids.us 9-12 yrs TEENick 13-17 yrs Nick at Night

    42. Kraft Capri Sun Age Segmentation • Kraft segments its Capri Sun business by age and occasion and markets accordingly KID 3-8 yrs On-the-Go 6.75oz 14 flavors TEEN 13-17 yrs Big Pouch 11.25oz 3 unique flavors Island Refreshers aluminum bottle SPORT 9-12 yrs Sport 2 sizes 2 flavors

    43. Kid Requests Develop Early On • Kids start asking for products as young as 2, but Mom is clearly in charge of purchase decisions at that young age. • First in-store request: age 2 • Median age for first requested retrieval: age 3 1/2 • Consciously seeking and retrieving products: age 6 • Able to recall product messages (packaging/advertising): age 6 • Median age of first solo purchase: age 8 Source: Mintel June 2002, Nickelodeon Magazine, Yankelovich, Inc. 2003, Kids Rock Feb 2001

    44. Kid Requests Grow With Exposure • By 5, kids are exposed to new products in many ways: • At age 5, kids enter kindergarten and a whole new world of “gotta have it” • 56% of kids 4-6 years old can read • 25% of kids 4-6 years old spend more than 1 hour a day on a computer • Kids are heavy TV viewers, watching on average 28 hours per week, 4 hours per day • Kids see over 500 commercials per week • By the age of 5, kids are “very” brand aware and asking for products by name • Kids are consciously seeking/retrieving products • “Nag factor” becomes kids “word-of-mouth” referral to parents Source: Ryan Research Dept; TV-Free America; CNN.com/2003/Health/parenting

    45. Kids World Review (Most trends noted refer to kids 8-11)

    46. Knowing Kids Means Knowing What They Like • Knowing kids means: • Knowing what they do during and after school • What they like in fashion • What sports interest them • What they do with free time • How they communicate • The world they are growing up in • Keeping on top of trends in these areas provides the best clues on how to reach them in the most relevant way. SOURCE: National Sporting Goods Association, Harris Interactive, American Heart Association, 2003 Youth Risk Factor Surveillance Study

    47. Sports

    48. Sports • 65% of kids 6-17 participate in sports every week; this actually represents a decline in physical activity among kids • Kids in the U.S. today are less fit than they were a generation ago – slower in endurance running and weaker • Extreme/action sports continue to be the fastest growing in terms of youth participation • Snowboarding increased 214%, and skateboarding 111% in the past 10 years • Alpine skiing and in-line skating experienced the biggest declines, 44% and 40%, respectively • ESPN X Games was the second most appealing sporting event to 6-to-17-year olds, behind the Olympic Games SOURCE: National Sporting Goods Association, Harris Interactive, American Heart Association, 2003 Youth Risk Factor Surveillance Study

    49. Trends in Sports • Boys’ top five favorite sports stars: • Michael Jordan • Derek Jeter • Dwayne Wade • Alex Rodriguez • Shaquille O’Neal • Girls’ top five favorite sports stars: • Mia Hamm • Michael Jordan • Derek Jeter • Michelle Kwan • Shaquille O’Neal Source: KidSay Trend Tracker, 5/06

    50. Kids Are Playing Sports • Boy’s 8-12 favorite sports to play • Basketball • Soccer • Baseball SOURCE: The Zandl Group, April 2006 – Boys 8-12