Rosids III - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Rosids III

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  1. Rosids III Fagales Brassicaceae Rutaceae Anacardiaceae Aceraceae

  2. Fagaceae • Oaks • Many tree species throughout N. America • TREES with SINGLE NUTS ATTACHED TO SPINY OR SCALY CAPS • One species in Colorado, Quercus gambelii

  3. Fagaceae

  4. Fagaceae

  5. Quercus fruits = nuts = acorns

  6. Quercus leaf

  7. Quercus gambelii – Gambel Oak

  8. Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) — Mustard family • FOUR MEROUS (old name cruciferae, like a cross) • HERBS, rarely shrubs • Tetradynamous stamens = 4 stamen, 2 long, 2 short • Gynoecium with a superior, 2- carpellate/loculate ovary, with axile-parietal placentation and a usually 2-valved, dehiscent fruit with a replum (silique or silicle). • 365 genera / 3250 species

  9. Brassicaceae

  10. Brassicaceae Glucosinolates - major plant secondary products in the Brassicaceae and close relatives. - deter herbivory and parasitism - flavoring agents in the commercially important members of the Brassicaceae, such brocolli, cauliflower, and mustard.

  11. Brassicaceae • Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, collards, kale (all cultivars of Brassica oleracea) • Rutabaga and canola oil (B. napus), mustard (B. nigra), turnip (B. rapa) • Arabidopsis thalliana is noted as a model for detailed molecular studies.

  12. Brassica nigra

  13. Cakile maritima

  14. Cardamine californicum

  15. Raphanus sativus

  16. Thysanocarpus laciniatus

  17. Malvaceae • The Mallow Family • Monadelphous stamen • Mucilaginous plants • Often with stellate trichomes

  18. Malvaceae – Economic importance Gossypium spp. (cotton, the world’s most important fiber plant) and Ceiba pentandra (kapok), in both of which the seed trichomes are utilized, and Corchorus spp. (jute), a bast fiber plant and source of burlap; Theobroma cacao (cacao, the source of chocolate), Cola nitida (cola), Abelmoschus (okra), and Durio zibethinus (durian) Ochroma pyramidale (balsa) and Pachira aquatica; Brachychiton, Chorisia (floss-silk tree), Dombeya, Fremontodendron, Hibiscus (mallows), and Tilia (linden tree). Many others, such as Adansonia digitata (baobab, tropical Africa) are of great local economic or ecological importance.

  19. Gossypium - cotton

  20. Hibiscus sp. Kosteletskia virginica

  21. Chorisia speciosa

  22. Theobroma cacao – the source of chocolate

  23. Anacardiaceae • Cashew or sumac family • SHRUBS W/ 3-LOBED OR PINNATE LEAVES • 1-SEEDED RED OR WHITE BERRIES • Poison Ivy and Poison Oak are in this family • Important shrub ecologically, Rhus trilobata

  24. Toxicodendronrydbergii

  25. Toxicodendronrydbergii

  26. Toxicodendronrydbergii

  27. Rhus trilobata

  28. Rhus trilobata

  29. Anacardiaceae MangoMangifera indica

  30. Anacardium occidentale; Cashew   

  31. Anacardium occidentale; Cashew   

  32. Aceraceae • Maple Family • TREES WITH OPPOSITE LEAVES AND WINGED SEENDS IN PAIRS • Acer glabrum and Acer negundo (Box elder)

  33. Aceraceae

  34. Aceraceae insect and wind pollinated

  35. Acer negundo – Box elder

  36. Acer glabrum – Mountain Maple

  37. Acer saccharum • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PML-cjYzENU&feature=related • Maple syrup is the boiled down xylem (commonly called sap) that the tree is sending up from the roots to the leaves to get the leaves started in the spring • It’s about the only time the xylem is rich in sugars