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Reverse Causation and the Transactional Interpretation

Reverse Causation and the Transactional Interpretation

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Reverse Causation and the Transactional Interpretation

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  1. Reverse Causation and the Transactional Interpretation QuantumMechanics John G. Cramer Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Washington Seattle, Washington 98195, USA AAAS Pacific Division: Frontiers of Time USD, San Diego, CA, June 21, 2006

  2. Outline of Talk • About Quantum Interpretations • An introduction to the Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics • A new Retro-Causality Quantum Paradox(or how to send messages back in time by 50 ms)

  3. A Quantum Metaphor (With apologies to Indostanis with Disabilities)

  4. The Blind Menand the Elephantby John Godfrey Saxe (1816-1887) It was six men of Indostan, To learning much inclined, Who went to see the Elephant, (Though all of them were blind), That each by observation, Might satisfy his mind. . The First approached the Elephant, And happening to fall, Against his broad and sturdy side, At once began to bawl: “God bless me! but the Elephant, Is very like a wall!” The Second, feeling of the tusk, Cried, “Ho! what have we here, So very round and smooth and sharp? To me ’tis mighty clear, This wonder of an Elephant, Is very like a spear!” The Third approached the animal, And happening to take, The squirming trunk within his hands, Thus boldly up and spake: “I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant, Is very like a snake!” The Fourth reached out an eager hand, And felt about the knee. “What most this wondrous beast is like, Is mighty plain,” quoth he; “ ‘Tis clear enough the Elephant, Is very like a tree!” The Fifth, who chanced to touch the ear, Said: “E’en the blindest man, Can tell what this resembles most; Deny the fact who can, This marvel of an Elephant, Is very like a fan!” The Sixth no sooner had begun, About the beast to grope, Than, seizing on the swinging tail, That fell within his scope, I see,” quoth he, “the Elephant, Is very like a rope!” And so these men of Indostan, Disputed loud and long, Each in his own opinion, Exceeding stiff and strong, Though each was partly in the right, And all were in the wrong! Moral: So oft in theologic wars, The disputants, I ween, Rail on in utter ignorance, Of what each other mean, And prate about an Elephant, Not one of them has seen! quantum interpretational discussions a quantum process

  5. Quantum Theory andInterpretations

  6. QuantumMechanics What is Quantum Mechanics? Quantum mechanics is a theory.Itis ourcurrent “standard model” for describingthe behavior of matter and energy atthe smallest scales (photons, atoms,nuclei, quarks, gluons, leptons, …). Like all theories, it consists of amathematical formalism, plus aninterpretation of that formalism. However, quantum mechanics differs from other physical theories because, while its formalism of has been accepted and used for 80 years, its interpretation remains a matter of controversy and debate. Like the opinions of the 6 blind men, there are many rival QM interpretations on the market (Copenhagen, Many-Worlds, …). Today, however, we’ll consider only one QM interpretation, the Transactional Interpretation of quantum mechanics.

  7. The Role of an Interpretation An interpretation of a formalism should: • Provide links between the mathematical symbols of the formalism and elementsof the physical world; • Neutralize the paradoxes; allof them;addressing only a few of the formalism’s interpretational problems is undesirable; • Provide tools for visualization, for speculation, and for extension. • An interpretation should not have its own sub-formalism! • It should not make its own testable predictions, (but it may be falsifiable, if it is found to be inconsistent with the formalism and/or with experiment)!

  8. Example: Newton’s 2nd Law • Formalism: • Interpretation: “The vector force Fon a body is proportional to the productof its scalar mass m, which is positive,and the 2nd time derivative a of its vector position.” • What this interpretation does: • It relates the formalism to physical observables. • It avoids the paradoxes that would arise ifm<0. • It insures that F||a.

  9. The TransactionalInterpretationof QuantumMechanics

  10. “Listening” to the Quantum Mechanical Formalism Consider a quantum matrix element: <S> =òv y* S y dr3= <f | S | i> … a y*- y“sandwich”. What does this suggest? Hint: The complex conjugation iny*is the Wigner operator for time reversal. Ifyis a retarded wave, then y* is an advanced wave. If y = A ei(kr -wt)theny* = A ei(-kr +wt) (retarded) (advanced) A retarded wave carries positive energy to the future. An advanced wave carries negative energy to the past.

  11. Maxwell’s Electromagnetic Wave Equation (Classical) Ñ2 Fi = 1/c2 ¶2Fi /¶t2 This is a 2nd order differential equation, which has two time solutions, retarded and advanced. Conventional Approach:Choose only the retarded solution(a “causality” boundary condition). Wheeler-Feynman Approach:Use ½retarded and ½advanced(time symmetry).

  12. A Wheeler-Feynman Electromagnetic “Transaction” • The emitter sends retarded and advanced waves. It “offers” to transfer energy.

  13. A Wheeler-Feynman Electromagnetic “Transaction” • The emitter sends retarded and advanced waves. It “offers” to transfer energy. • The absorber responds with an advanced wave that“confirms” the transaction. Absorber

  14. A Wheeler-Feynman Electromagnetic “Transaction” • The emitter sends retarded and advanced waves. It “offers” to transfer energy. • The absorber responds with an advanced wave that“confirms” the transaction. • The loose ends cancel and disappear, and energy is transferred.

  15. Overview of theTransactional Interpretation Offer Wave: The initial wave function y is interpreted as aretarded-wave offer to form a quantum event. Confirmation wave: The conjugate wave function y* is interpreted as an advanced-wave confirmation to proceed with the quantum event. Transaction – the Quantum Handshake: The many yy* combinations present in the QM formalism are interpreted as indicating the formation of a forward/back-in-time standing wave that transfers energy, momentum, and other conserved quantities. No Observers: Transactions involving observers are no different from other transactions; Observers and their knowledge play no special roles. No Paradoxes:Transactions are intrinsically nonlocal, and all (?) paradoxes are resolved. Few Postulates (Economical):Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and Born’s statistical interpretationcan be derived from the Transactional Interpretation.

  16. The QuantumTransactional Model We apply the same logic to QM: Step 1: The emitter sendsout an “offer wave” Y.

  17. The QuantumTransactional Model We apply the same logic to QM: Step 1: The emitter sendsout an “offer wave” Y. Step 2: The absorber responds with a “confirmation wave”Y*.

  18. The QuantumTransactional Model We apply the same logic to QM: Step 1: The emitter sendsout an “offer wave” Y. Step 2: The absorber responds with a “confirmation wave”Y*. Step 3: The process repeats until energy and momentum is transferred and the transaction is completed (wave function collapse).

  19. The TI and theUncertainty Principle • The completed transactionprojects out only that part of the offer wave y that had been reinforced by the confirmation wave y* (=> measurement). • Consequently, the transactioncan project out only one of two complementary variables. • This accounts for Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle.

  20. The TI and theBorn Probability Law • Starting from E&M and theWheeler-Feynman approach, theE-field “echo” that the emitterreceives from the absorber isthe product of the retarded-waveE-field at the absorber and the advanced-wave E-field at the emitter. • Translating this to quantummechanical terms, the “echo” thatthe emitter receives from eachpotential absorber is yiyi*, leadingto the Born Probability Law. Wave amplitudehere is yy*

  21. Role of the Observerin the TI l In the Copenhagen Interpretation,observers are given the special roleas “Collapsers of Wave Functions”.This leads to problems, e.g., inquantum cosmology where noobservers are presumably present. l In the Transactional Interpretation, transactions involving an observer are the same as any other transactions. l Thus, the observer-centric aspects of the Copenhagen Interpretation are avoided.

  22. Can the TI be Tested? • The simple answer is “No!”. It is the formalism of quantum mechanics that makes all of the testable predictions. • As long as an interpretation like the TI is consistent with the formalism, it will make the same predictions as any other valid interpretation, and no experimental tests are possible. • However, an interpretations may be inconsistent with the quantum mechanical formalism and its predictions. • If this is true, then the interpretation can be falsified. • The Transactional Interpretation follows the quantum formalism very closely and does not appear to have problems in this area.

  23. The TI and Some Quantum Paradoxes

  24. Paradox 1 (non-locality):Einstein’s Bubble Situation: A photon is emitted from a source having no directional preference.

  25. Paradox 1 (non-locality):Einstein’s Bubble Situation: A photon is emitted from a source having no directional preference. Its spherical wave function Y expands like an inflating bubble.

  26. Paradox 1 (non-locality):Einstein’s Bubble Question: (originally asked by Albert Einstein) If a photon is detected at Detector A, how does thephoton’s wave function Y at the locations of Detectors B & C “know” that it should vanish? Situation: A photon is emitted from a source having no directional preference. Its spherical wave function Y expands like an inflating bubble. It reaches Detector A, and the Y bubble “pops” and disappears.

  27. Paradox 1 (non-locality):Einstein’s Bubble It is as if one throws a beer bottle into Boston Harbor. It disappears, and its quantum ripples spread all over the Atlantic. Then in Copenhagen, the beer bottle suddenly jumps onto the dock, and the ripples disappear everywhere else. That’s what quantum mechanics says happens to electrons and photons when they move from place to place.

  28. Paradox 1 (non-locality):Einstein’s Bubble TI Explanation: • A transaction developsbetween the source anddetector A, transferring the energy there and blocking any similar transfer to the other potential detectors, due to the 1-photon boundary condition. • The transactional handshakes acts nonlocally to answer Einstein’s question. • We will return to nonlocality, the EPR Paradox, and possible retro-causal implications later in the talk.

  29. Paradox 2 (wave/particle):Wheeler’s Delayed Choice A source emits one photon.Its wave function passesthrough slits 1 and 2, makinginterference beyond the slits. The observer can choose to either:(a) measure the interference pattern at planes1, requiring that the photon travels through both slits. or(b) measure at which slit image it appears in planes2,indicating thatit has passed only through slit 2. * * * The observer waits until after the photon has passed the slits to decide which measurement to do.

  30. Paradox 2 (wave/particle):Wheeler’s Delayed Choice Thus, in Wheeler’s accountof the process, the photon doesnot “decide” if it is a particleor a wave until after it passesthe slits, even though a particlemust pass through only one slit while a wave must pass through both slits. Wheeler asserts that the measurement choice determines whether the photon is a particle or a wave retroactively!

  31. Paradox 2 (wave/particle):Wheeler’s Delayed Choice TI Explanation: • If the screen at s1 is up, atransaction forms betweens1 and the source andinvolves waves passingthrough both slits 1 and 2.

  32. Paradox 2 (wave/particle):Wheeler’s Delayed Choice TI Explanation: • If the screen at s1 is up, atransaction forms betweens1 and the source andinvolves waves passingthrough both slits 1 and 2. • If the screen at s1 is down, a transaction forms between detectors 1’ or 2’ and the source S, and involves waves passing through only one slit.

  33. Paradox 2 (wave/particle):Wheeler’s Delayed Choice TI Explanation: • If the screen at s1 is up, atransaction forms betweens1 and the source andinvolves waves passingthrough both slits 1 and 2. • If the screen at s1 is down, a transaction forms between detectors 1’ or 2’ and the source S, and involves waves passing through only one slit. • In either case, when the measurement decision was made is irrelevant.

  34. Paradox 3 (interference):The Afshar Experiment • In a Delayed Choice setup, place wires with 6% opacity at the positions of the interference minima at s1; • Place detector at 2’ on plane s2 and observe the particles passing through slit 2. • Question: What fraction of the light is blocked by the grid and not transmitted to 2’? (i.e., is the interference pattern still there when one is measuring particle behavior?)

  35. Paradox 3 (interference):The Afshar Experiment No Grid & 2 Slits No Loss Grid & 1 Slit 6% Loss Grid & 2 Slits <0.1% Loss

  36. Paradox 3 (interference):The Afshar Experiment One open Wire present Both open No Wire Both open Wire present

  37. Paradox 3 (interference):The Afshar Experiment • Conclusions: • Interference is still present, even when an unambiguous Welcher-Weg (which-way) experiment is performed. • Measuring particle-like behavior does not suppress wave-like behavior, if careful non-interactive measurements are made. • It appears that light waves must pass both slits to create the interference, even when the photon passes through only one slit.

  38. Paradox 3 (interference):The Afshar Experiment TI Explanation: The initial offer waves pass through both slits on their way to possible absorbers. At the wires, the offer waves cancel in first order, so that no transactions can form and no photons can be intercepted by the wires. Therefore, the absorption by the wires should be very small (<<6%) and consistent with what is observed. destructive

  39. A new Retro-Causality Paradox (or how to send messages back in time by 50 ms)

  40. LiIO3 Crystal 351.1 nmUV Laser Beam l1=702.2 nm BeamStop l2=702.2 nm Entangled Photons: Energy and Momentum Conservation: Down-Conversion with LiIO3

  41. Note the useof coincidence. Dopfer’s Position-MomentumEPR Experiment LiIO3 Down-ConversionCrystal “Heisenberg” Lens f = 86 cm “Heisenberg”Detector D1 UV LaserBeam 28.2o Laser BeamStop 28.2o f 2f Auxiliary Lens Double Slit System a= 75 mm, d = 255 mm Momentum Position Double-SlitDetector D2 CoincidenceCircuit or Birgit Dopfer PhD Thesis U. Innsbruck, 1998. f 2f

  42. Can EPR be used for Observer-to-Observer Communication? • There are theorems in the literature (Eberhard, Shimony, …) showing that EPR nonlocal observer-to-observer communication is impossible. • Peacock and Hepburn have shown that these “proofs” are tautological and that certain key assumptions are inconsistent with aspects of the quantum formalism (e.g., BE symmetrization). • Therefore, the question remains “open” (at least a crack).

  43. Cramer’s Retrocausal Dopfer Experiment 2nd Object Plane Transmitter Fiber-Optics Light Pipes (n = 1.5) “1” “0” 10km Slit Image Plane k1 k0 k2 1st Object Plane (Slits) “0” “1” Based on a suggestion by Raymond Jensen U. Notre Dame, 2006. Receiver(interference or no interference?) The signal arrives 50 ms before it is sent!

  44. t x A Transactional Analysis ofthe Dopfer Experiment f 2f D1 From the point of view of the Transactional Interpretation, the nonlocal connection between detection events at D1 and D2 arises because the two transactions must share a “handshake” at the LiIO3 crystal, which can only be realized when the summed energies and momenta of the two photons equal that of the pump-laser photon that created them. Moreover, if a photon is detected when D2is in the 2fposition where the one of the slit is imaged, the advanced-wave confirmation can pass only through that slit, and no 2-slit interference is possible. On the other hand, , if a photon is detected when D2 is in the f position illuminated by both slits, the advanced-wave confirmation can pass through both slits and 2-slit interference is present. No barrier to retro-causation is apparent in this TI analysis. Advanced Wave Retarded Wave Retro-causalInfluence? k1 D2 Advanced Wave Retarded Wave k2 LiIO3Crystal

  45. Conclusions • The Transactional Interpretation provides a way of understanding the counter-intuitive aspects of quantum mechanics. • Its advance-retarded handshake provides a way of understanding the intrinsic nonlocality of quantum mechanics, while preserving the constraints of special relativity. • Among quantum interpretations, the TI is unusual in providing a graphic way of visualizing quantum processes (including quantum computing). • Analysis of the Dopfer Experiment with the Transactional Interpretation does not reveal any “show-stopper” that would prevent retrocausal signaling.

  46. References Transactional • “The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics”, Reviews of Modern Physics 58, 647 (1986). Available athttp://www.npl.washington.edu/TIor at the RMP web site. • “The Plane of the Present and the Transactional Paradigm of Time”, Chapter 9 of Time and the Instant, Robin Drurie, ed., Clinamen Press, UK (2001); ArXiv reprint: quant-ph/0507089 • “Zwei Experimente zur Interferenz von Zwei-Photonen Zuständen”, Birgit Dopfer, PhD Thesis, U. Innsbruck (1998). • The PowerPoint version of this talk will soon be available at: http://faculty.washington.edu/jcramer

  47. TheEnd