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Art of Africa: Objects form the Warren Robbins Collection. Carlin George @02628703. Table of Contents. Who is Warren Robbins Some objects in the collection include The ceremonial mask of the Yaka People Lozi Bowl Conclusion Museum Map Bibliography . Who is Warren Robbins.

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Art of Africa: Objects form the Warren Robbins Collection


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    1. Art of Africa: Objects form the Warren Robbins Collection Carlin George @02628703

    2. Table of Contents • Who is Warren Robbins • Some objects in the collection include • The ceremonial mask of the Yaka People • Lozi Bowl • Conclusion • Museum Map • Bibliography

    3. Who is Warren Robbins Robbins was born in Worcester, Massachusetts, on September 4, 1923. He attend the University of New Hampshire where he earned a bachelor's degree in English in 1945 and was awarded a master's degree in history from the University of Michigan in 1949. After graduating from college, he taught American children living in Europe and then became a cultural affairs officer for the Department of State. In succeeding years, Robbins raised money to acquire the remaining half of the Douglass house, naming it the Museum of African Art. As his collection grew, he purchased adjoining residences, with his museum ultimately including nine townhouses, 16 garages and two carriage houses. He was the museum's first directorand remained in the position until 1983. The museum was relocated to the National Mall in 1987 and renamed the National Museum of African Art.

    4. Some of the Objects in this Collection include... Married Woman's Apron (ijogolo) Ndebele People, South Africa Ceremonial Mask Yaure People, Cote d' Ivoire Initiation Ceremonial Mask (korubla) Senufo people, Cote d'Ivoire Shrine Staff (osanyin) Yoruba People, Nigeria All Pictures and Artifacts are courtesy of the Robbins Center for Cross Cultural Communication. More Pictures can be found at http://www.art.howard.edu/gallery/exhibitions/art-of-africa/gallery.html

    5. Ceremonial Mask of the Yaka People The Kwango River area (southwest of the Democratic Republic of the Congo) is the home of some 300,000 highly artistic Yaka people. Yaka or yakala means “males,” “the strong ones,” thus Bayaka, “the strong people.” The Yaka society is organized into strong lineage group headed by elders and lineage headmen. The Yaka hunters perform a specific ritual under the direction of the “master of the earth” (the chief or King) to guarantee that they obtain game. The Yaka have an initiation, the n-khanda. A special hut is built in the forest to give shelter to the postulants during their retreat; the event ends in circumcision, an occasion for great masked festivities including dances and songs. The n-khanda is organized every time there are enough eligible youths between ten and fifteen years of age

    6. Lozi Bowl The members of the Lozi tribe of Zambia used ornamental bowls for food storage. A lidded bowl with a decorative handle would be used to store meat or vegetables. The serving implement also reinforces the ruling power of the region as such bowls are carved by members of subjugated groups exclusively for use at the Lozi courts. The Lozi have a tradition of giving bowls as gifts to non-Lozi peoples. In 1905, the Lozi king, himself a carver, created a curio shop at Victoria Falls to sell to tourists. This expanded market may have led to an increase in figurative lids, many of which feature water birds.

    7. Conclusion Art is central to life in traditional African societies. At every stage of African life and culture Art is used, whether in ceremonies, gatherings and greetings or as gifts. The hand-crafted visual forms are used to fulfill spiritual and practical needs within the community and around the world. Warren Robbin started the Museum of African Art in 1964, he opened up a world of artifacts, textiles, sculptures, masks and a variety of African Art to modern America and many other countries nations and regions. Unfortunately Warren Robbins at age 85 on died Dec. 4 2008 but his collections and spirit will live on forever, through exhibitions such as these, showcases and international galleries. More information about Warren Robbins or the Smithsonian National African Art Museum can be found….. http://www.sil.si.edu/Libraries/nmafa/ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEGp7-2a7lc&feature=related

    8. Museum Map

    9. Bibliography • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZEGp7-2a7lc&feature=related • http://www.sil.si.edu/Libraries/nmafa/ • http://www.zyama.com/yaka/pics..htm • http://www.ezakwantu.com/Gallery%20African%20Meat%20Trays%20-%20Meat%20Platters.htm • http://www.art.howard.edu/gallery/exhibitions/art-of-africa/