Mammals Grew 1,000 Times Larger After the Demise of the Dinosaurs - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Mammals Grew 1,000 Times Larger After the Demise of the Dinosaurs

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  1. Mammals Grew 1,000 Times Larger After the Demise of the Dinosaurs The largest land mammals that ever lived, Indricotherium and Deinotherium, would have towered over the living African Elephant. Indricotherium lived during the Eocene to the Oligocene Epoch (37 to 23 million years ago) and reached a mass of 15,000 kg, while Deinotherium was around from the late-Miocene until the early Pleistocene (8.5 to 2.7 million years ago) and weighed as much as 17,000 kg.

  2. Fig. 3 Global fluctuations in maximum body size and various abiotic factors over the Cenozoic. F A Smith et al. Science 2010;330:1216-1219 Published by AAAS

  3. millions of years ago gibbon chimpanzee gorilla orangutan human 0 Hominidae 6 Hylobatidae Pongidae Are gorillas and chimps each other's closest relatives? 12

  4. Filling the African “Ape Gap” from14- to 7-Myr • Over the last year a number of new genera of great apes related to the modern Gorilla have been described that fill the gap. • Ouranopithecus 9.6 –8.7 Myr ago. • Samburupithecus 9.6 Myr ago • Nakalipithecus 9.9-9.8 Myr ago • Chororapithecus10–11 Myr ago.

  5. First fossil chimpanzee Sally McBrearty and Nina G. Jablonski • First unequivocal chimp fossils dated to ~545,000 bp. Contemporary with Homo erectus from the same site. Nature437, 105-108 (1 September 2005)

  6. Placing confidence limits on the molecular age of the human–chimpanzee divergence • Data from 167 nuclear protein-coding genes, correcting for rate heterogeneity and using 23.8-35 MYA as the date for the Old world Monkey – Ape split as a calibration time, suggest that the 95% confidence interval for the human - chimpanzee divergence is: • 4.98 – 7.02 MYA Kumar et al. 2005 PNAS 102:18842-18847

  7. Ardipithecus ramidus • 4.5 mya • Soon after the human-chimp split • More ape-like than Australopithecus

  8. Ardipithecus fossils from 5.3 - 5.8 mya On the lineage to modern chimpanzee???

  9. 2002 discovery of hominid from Chad with a mosaic of primitive (very small brain) and derived (small canines) features Sahelanthropus tchadensis 6-7 mya

  10. Orrorin tugenensis Femoral Morphology and the Evolution of Hominin Bipedalism • Richmond & Jungers Morphological comparisons among femora of or attributed to (A) P. troglodytes, (B) O. tugenensis (BAR 1002'00), (C and D) Paranthropus robustus (SK 97 and SK 82, reversed), (E) A. afarensis (A.L. 288-1ap), (F) Paranthropus boisei (KNM-ER 1503, reversed), (G) early Homo (KNM-ER 1481), and (H) modern H. sapiens. Like other early hominin femora (C to F), BAR 1002'00 (B) is distinct from those of modern humans (H) and great apes (A) in having a long, anteroposteriorly narrow neck and wide proximal shaft. Early Homo femora (G) have larger heads and broader necks compared to early hominins. In addition to these features, modern human femora (H) have short necks and mediolaterally narrow shafts. Scale bar, 2 cm Bipedalism is a key human adaptation and a defining feature of the hominin clade. Fossil femora discovered in Kenya and attributed to Orrorin tugenensis, at 6 million years ago, purportedly provide the earliest postcranial evidence of hominin bipedalism, but their functional and phylogenetic affinities are controversial. We show that the O. tugenensis femur differs from those of apes and Homo and most strongly resembles those of Australopithecus and Paranthropus, indicating that O. tugenensis was bipedal but is not more closely related to Homo than to Australopithecus. Femoral morphology indicates that O. tugenensis shared distinctive hip biomechanics with australopiths, suggesting that this complex evolved early in human evolution and persisted for almost 4 million years until modifications of the hip appeared in the late Pliocene in early Homo. Science 21 March 2008:Vol. 319. no. 5870, pp. 1662 - 1665

  11. Australopithecus Homo

  12. Earliest Homonids • Australopithecus anamensis 3.9 – 4.2 mya • A. afarensis ‘Lucy” 3.0 – 3.9 mya • A. africanus & A. garhi 2.4 – 2.8 mya • A. robustus / boisei / aethiopicus 1.0 – 2.7 mya

  13. “Lucy” Australopithecus afarensis 3 mya

  14. Laetoli Tracks - 3 mya • Lack of a splayed big toe suggests full bipedalism by 3 mya

  15. Lack of a splayed big toe suggests full bipedalism by 3 mya = bipedality in A. afarensis

  16. Lucy Modern Human Chimp

  17. VERTEBRAL RECONSTRUCTION A. arafensis

  18. Recent analysis of fossil wrist bones suggest the A. afarensismay have occasionally used knuckle walking like modern chimps and gorillas.

  19. RECONSTRUCTIONS BASED ON MUSCLE ATTACHMENTS

  20. An early Australopithecus afarensis postcranium from Woranso-Mille, Ethiopia Haile-Selassie et al. Dated to 3.6 million years ago,the robust male stood between 1.5 and 1.7 meters tall, about 30% larger than Lucy. Isolated bones of other individuals suggest that some males were even larger, so the new skeleton doesn’t settle a long-standing debate over just how much sexual dimorphism there was in A. afarensis PNAS | July 6, 2010 | vol. 107 | no. 27 | 12121–12126

  21. Australopithecus afarensis • ~4 ft. tall (sexually dimorphic?) • Mixed Bipedal / climbing, curved phalanges • Brain size MUCH closer to chimp than Modern Human

  22. Fig. 1 Craniodental elements of Au. sediba L. R. Berger et al., Science 328, 195-204 (2010) Published by AAAS

  23. Fig. 2 Associated skeletal elements of MH1 (left) and MH2 (right), in approximate anatomical position, superimposed over an illustration of an idealized Au L. R. Berger et al., Science 328, 195-204 (2010) Published by AAAS

  24. Australopithecus sediba at 1.977 Ma and Implications for the Origins of the Genus Homo The right forearm and hand (hand skeleton ∼12.3 centimeters long) of (Australopithecus sediba), specimen Malapa Hominin 2. Papers in this issue present a detailed look at the hands, feet, pelvis, brain endocast, and age of this hominid, which lived 2 million years ago, near the emergence of our genus, Homo.

  25. Pelvic tilt. The pelvic blades of Au. africanus (left) flare more widely than those of the younger Au. sediba from South Africa (right; reconstructed parts are in gray or white). Au. sediba's hand has some humanlike traits, but its arm is long and primitive.

  26. Fig. 3 Comparisons of virtual endocasts in (A) superior, (B) inferior, (C) anterior, and (D) left lateral views. K J Carlson et al. Science 2011;333:1402-1407 Published by AAAS

  27. Fig. 2 Comparison of the MH1 (left), Sts 14 (center), and MH2 (right, mirror-imaged) pelves in anteroinferior (top row) and anterosuperior (bottom row) views. Comparison of the MH1 (left), Sts 14 (center), and MH2 (right, mirror-imaged) pelves in anteroinferior (top row) and anterosuperior (bottom row) views. Areas represented in white or light gray in the MH1 and MH2 pelves represent reconstructed portions of the pelvis (SOM text S1). Sts 14 is attributed to Au. africanus and is represented by the virtual reconstruction of (41). Scale bar in centimeters [note that the anterosuperior view of Sts 14, as provided by (41), is in a slightly different orientation than those of MH1 and MH2]. An additional comparison is provided in fig. S7 J M Kibii et al. Science 2011;333:1407-1411 Published by AAAS

  28. Fig. 6 Relative length of the thumb in the Au. sediba MH2 hand. Relative length of the thumb in the Au. sediba MH2 hand. Shown is a box-and-whisker plot of the relative length of the thumb calculated as a ratio of the total length of the Mc1 and first proximal phalanx to the total length of the Mc3 and third proximal and intermediate phalanges within the same individual (bones highlighted in dark gray in outline of MH2 hand) in all taxa apart from Au. afarensis, for which that ratio is derived from multiple individuals from different sites (30, 38). MH2 has a relatively longer thumb than that of other hominins and falls outside the range of variation in modern humans (highlighted by shaded box). T L Kivell et al. Science 2011;333:1411-1417 Published by AAAS

  29. A. africanus 2.5 mya “Taung” child Approx. 3-4 years old

  30. A. africanus

  31. Australopithecus Ardipithecus Asa Issie, Aramis and the origin of Australopithecus Tim D. White et al. Nature440, 883-889 (13 April 2006) The origin of Australopithecus, the genus widely interpreted as ancestral to Homo, is a central problem in human evolutionary studies.Australopithecus species differ markedly from extant African apes and candidate ancestral hominids such as Ardipithecus, Orrorin and Sahelanthropus. The earliest described Australopithecus species is Au. anamensis, the probable chronospecies ancestor of Au. afarensis. Here we describe newly discovered fossils from the Middle Awash study area that extend the known Au. anamensis range into northeastern Ethiopia. The new fossils are from chronometrically controlled stratigraphic sequences and date to about 4.1–4.2 million years ago. They include diagnostic craniodental remains, the largest hominid canine yet recovered, and the earliest Australopithecus femur. These new fossils are sampled from a woodland context. Temporal and anatomical intermediacy between Ar. ramidus and Au. afarensis suggest a relatively rapid shift from Ardipithecus to Australopithecus in this region of Africa, involving either replacement or accelerated phyletic evolution. “Lucy” Chimp

  32. Robust Australopithecines Genus: Paranthropus

  33. ROBUST SPECIES P. aethiopicus 2.6 mya P. boisei 2.6 - 1.0 mya P. robustus 2.0 – 1.2 mya • Large sagittal crests, massive jaw muscles and teeth • Small brains • Number of biological species???

  34. P. boisei 2.6 - 1.0 mya

  35. P. aethiopicus The “Black Skull” Kenya 2.5 mya

  36. Australophitecus garhi (n=1) Possible ancestor to Homo? 2.5 mya from eastern Africa

  37. NEW HOMONID FROM 3.5 MYA • Mosaic of primitive and derive characters • Flat face and smallish teeth Kenyanthropus platyops

  38. MULTIPLE HOMONID SPECIES BETWEEN 3.5 – 2.0 MYA K. platyops K. rudolfensis

  39. Multiple co-occurring hominid species Sahelanthropus tchadensis 6-7 mya