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The Fibonacci Numbers And An Unexpected Calculation. Leonardo Fibonacci. In 1202, Fibonacci proposed a problem about the growth of rabbit populations. Leonardo Fibonacci. In 1202, Fibonacci proposed a problem about the growth of rabbit populations. Leonardo Fibonacci.

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leonardo fibonacci
Leonardo Fibonacci
  • In 1202, Fibonacci proposed a problem about the growth of rabbit populations.
leonardo fibonacci3
Leonardo Fibonacci
  • In 1202, Fibonacci proposed a problem about the growth of rabbit populations.
leonardo fibonacci4
Leonardo Fibonacci
  • In 1202, Fibonacci proposed a problem about the growth of rabbit populations.
the rabbit reproduction model
The rabbit reproduction model
  • A rabbit lives forever
  • The population starts as a single newborn pair
  • Every month, each productive pair begets a new pair which will become productive after 2 months old
  • Fn= # of rabbit pairs at the beginning of the nth month
the rabbit reproduction model6
The rabbit reproduction model
  • A rabbit lives forever
  • The population starts as a single newborn pair
  • Every month, each productive pair begets a new pair which will become productive after 2 months old
  • Fn= # of rabbit pairs at the beginning of the nth month
the rabbit reproduction model7
The rabbit reproduction model
  • A rabbit lives forever
  • The population starts as a single newborn pair
  • Every month, each productive pair begets a new pair which will become productive after 2 months old
  • Fn= # of rabbit pairs at the beginning of the nth month
the rabbit reproduction model8
The rabbit reproduction model
  • A rabbit lives forever
  • The population starts as a single newborn pair
  • Every month, each productive pair begets a new pair which will become productive after 2 months old
  • Fn= # of rabbit pairs at the beginning of the nth month
the rabbit reproduction model9
The rabbit reproduction model
  • A rabbit lives forever
  • The population starts as a single newborn pair
  • Every month, each productive pair begets a new pair which will become productive after 2 months old
  • Fn= # of rabbit pairs at the beginning of the nth month
the rabbit reproduction model10
The rabbit reproduction model
  • A rabbit lives forever
  • The population starts as a single newborn pair
  • Every month, each productive pair begets a new pair which will become productive after 2 months old
  • Fn= # of rabbit pairs at the beginning of the nth month
the rabbit reproduction model11
The rabbit reproduction model
  • A rabbit lives forever
  • The population starts as a single newborn pair
  • Every month, each productive pair begets a new pair which will become productive after 2 months old
  • Fn= # of rabbit pairs at the beginning of the nth month
inductive definition or recurrence relation for the fibonacci numbers
Inductive Definition or Recurrence Relation for theFibonacci Numbers

Stage 0, Initial Condition, or Base Case:

Fib(1) = 1; Fib (2) = 1

Inductive Rule

For n>3, Fib(n) = Fib(n-1) + Fib(n-2)

inductive definition or recurrence relation for the fibonacci numbers13
Inductive Definition or Recurrence Relation for theFibonacci Numbers

Stage 0, Initial Condition, or Base Case:

Fib(0) = 0; Fib (1) = 1

Inductive Rule

For n>1, Fib(n) = Fib(n-1) + Fib(n-2)

sneezwort achilleaptarmica
Sneezwort (Achilleaptarmica)

Each time the plant starts a new shoot it takes two months before it is strong enough to support branching.

counting petals
Counting Petals
  • 5 petals: buttercup, wild rose, larkspur, columbine (aquilegia) 8 petals: delphiniums 13 petals: ragwort, corn marigold, cineraria, some daisies
  • 21 petals: aster, black-eyed susan, chicory 34 petals: plantain, pyrethrum 55, 89 petals: michaelmas daisies, the asteraceae family.
pineapple whorls
Pineapple whorls
  • Church and Turing were both interested in the number of whorls in each ring of the spiral. The ratio of consecutive ring lengths approaches the Golden Ratio.
how to divide polynomials

1

+ X

+ X2

1 – X

1

-(1 – X)

X2

X3

X

-(X – X2)

-(X2 – X3)

1 + X + X2 + X3 + X4+ X5 + X6 + X7 + …

=

How to divide polynomials?

1

?

1 – X

the geometric series

Xn+1 - 1

1 + X1 + X2 + X 3 + … + Xn-1 + Xn =

X- 1

The Geometric Series
slide25

Xn+1 - 1

1 + X1 + X2 + X 3 + … + Xn-1 + Xn =

X- 1

  • The limit as n goes to infinity of

=

- 1

Xn+1 - 1

X- 1

X- 1

=

1

1 - X

the infinite geometric series

1

1 + X1 + X2 + X 3 + … + Xn + ….. =

1 - X

The Infinite Geometric Series
slide27

1

1 + X1 + X2 + X 3 + … + Xn + ….. =

1 - X

  • (X-1) ( 1 + X1 + X2 + X 3 + … + Xn + … )
  • = X1 + X2 + X 3 + … + Xn + Xn+1 + ….
  • - 1 - X1 - X2 - X 3 - … - Xn-1 – Xn - Xn+1 - …
  • = 1
slide28

1

1 + X1 + X2 + X 3 + … + Xn + ….. =

1 - X

1

+ X

1 – X

1

-(1 – X)

X2

X3

X

-(X – X2)

+ X2 + …

-(X2 – X3)

something a bit more complicated

X

+ X2

+ 2X3

+ 3X4

+ 5X5

+ 8X6

1 – X – X2

X

-(X – X2 – X3)

X2 + X3

-(X2 – X3 – X4)

2X3 + X4

-(2X3 – 2X4 – 2X5)

3X4 + 2X5

-(3X4 – 3X5 – 3X6)

5X5 + 3X6

8X6 + 5X7

-(5X5 – 5X6 – 5X7)

-(8X6 – 8X7 – 8X8)

Something a bit more complicated

X

1 – X – X2

hence
Hence

X

  • = F0 1 + F1 X1 + F2 X2 +F3 X3 + F4 X4 + F5 X5 + F6 X6 + …

1 – X – X2

  • = 01 + 1 X1 + 1 X2 + 2X3 + 3X4 + 5X5 + 8X6 + …
going the other way
Going the Other Way
  • (1 - X- X2)  ( F0 1 + F1 X1 + F2 X2 + … + Fn-2 Xn-2 + Fn-1 Xn-1 + Fn Xn + …
  • = ( F0 1 + F1 X1 + F2 X2 + … + Fn-2 Xn-2 + Fn-1 Xn-1 + Fn Xn + …
  • - F0 X1 - F1 X2 - … - Fn-3 Xn-2 - Fn-2 Xn-1 - Fn-1 Xn - …
  • - F0 X2 - … - Fn-4 Xn-2 - Fn-3 Xn-1 - Fn-2 Xn - …
  • = F0 1 + ( F1 – F0 ) X1

F0 = 0, F1 = 1

= X

slide32
Thus
  • F0 1 + F1 X1 + F2 X2 + … + Fn-1 Xn-1 + Fn Xn + …

X

=

1 – X – X2

sequences that sum to n
Sequences That Sum To n
  • Let fn+1 be the number of different sequences of 1’s and 2’s that sum to n.
  • Example: f5 = 5
  • 4 = 2 + 2
  • 2 + 1 + 1
  • 1 + 2 + 1
  • 1 + 1 + 2
  • 1 + 1 + 1 + 1
sequences that sum to n35
Sequences That Sum To n
  • Let fn+1 be the number of different sequences of 1’s and 2’s that sum to n.

f2 = 1

1 = 1

f1 = 1

0 = the empty sum

f3 = 2

2 = 1 + 1

2

sequences that sum to n36

# of sequences beginning with a 2

# of sequences beginning with a 1

Sequences That Sum To n
  • Let fn+1 be the number of different sequences of 1’s and 2’s that sum to n.

fn+1 = fn + fn-1

fibonacci numbers again
Fibonacci Numbers Again
  • Let fn+1 be the number of different sequences of 1’s and 2’s that sum to n.

fn+1 = fn + fn-1

f1 = 1 f2 = 1

visual representation tiling
Visual Representation: Tiling
  • Let fn+1 be the number of different ways to tile a 1 X n strip with squares and dominoes.
visual representation tiling39
Visual Representation: Tiling
  • Let fn+1 be the number of different ways to tile a 1 X n strip with squares and dominoes.
visual representation tiling40
Visual Representation: Tiling
  • 1 way to tile a strip of length 0
  • 1 way to tile a strip of length 1:
  • 2 ways to tile a strip of length 2:
f n 1 f n f n 1
fn+1 = fn + fn-1
  • fn+1 is number of ways to title length n.
  • fn tilings that start with a square.
  • fn-1 tilings that start with a domino.
fibonacci identities
Fibonacci Identities
  • The Fibonacci numbers have many unusual properties. The many properties that can be stated as equations are called Fibonacci identities.
  • Ex: Fm+n+1 = Fm+1 Fn+1 + Fm Fn
f n 2 f n 1 f n 1 1 n46

n-1

(Fn)2 = Fn-1 Fn+1 + (-1)n

Fn tilings of a strip of length n-1

f n 2 f n 1 f n 1 1 n48
(Fn)2 = Fn-1 Fn+1 + (-1)n

n

(Fn)2 tilings of two strips of size n-1

f n 2 f n 1 f n 1 1 n49
(Fn)2 = Fn-1 Fn+1 + (-1)n

n

Draw a vertical “fault line” at the rightmost position (<n) possible without cutting any dominoes

f n 2 f n 1 f n 1 1 n50
(Fn)2 = Fn-1 Fn+1 + (-1)n

n

Swap the tails at the fault line to map to a tiling of 2 n-1 ‘s to a tiling of an n-2 and an n.

f n 2 f n 1 f n 1 1 n51
(Fn)2 = Fn-1 Fn+1 + (-1)n

n

Swap the tails at the fault line to map to a tiling of 2 n-1 ‘s to a tiling of an n-2 and an n.

f n is called the n th fibonacci number
Fn is called the nth Fibonacci number

F0=0, F1=1, and Fn=Fn-1+Fn-2 for n2

Fn is defined by a recurrence relation. What is a closed form formula for Fn?

golden ratio divine proportion
Golden Ratio Divine Proportion
  •  = 1.6180339887498948482045…
  • “Phi” is named after the Greek sculptor Phidias
definition of euclid
Definition of  (Euclid)
  • Ratio obtained when you divide a line segment into two unequal parts such that the ratio of the whole to the larger part is the same as the ratio of the larger to the smaller.
divina proportione luca pacioli 1509
Divina ProportioneLuca Pacioli (1509)
  • Pacioli devoted an entire book to the marvelous properties of . The book was illustrated by a friend of his named:

Leonardo Da Vinci

table of contents
Table of contents
  • The first considerable effect
  • The second essential effect
  • The third singular effect
  • The fourth ineffable effect
  • The fifth admirable effect
  • The sixth inexpressible effect
  • The seventh inestimable effect
  • The ninth most excellent effect
  • The twelfth incomparable effect
  • The thirteenth most distinguished effect
table of contents62
Table of contents
  • “For the sake of our salvation this list of effects must end.”
aesthetics
Aesthetics
  •  plays a central role in renaissance art and architecture.
  • After measuring the dimensions of pictures, cards, books, snuff boxes, writing paper, windows, and such, psychologist Gustav Fechner claimed that the preferred rectangle had sides in the golden ratio (1871).
1 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55
1,1,2,3,5,8,13,21,34,55,….
  • 2/1 = 2
  • 3/2 = 1.5
  • 5/3 = 1.666…
  • 8/5 = 1.6
  • 13/8 = 1.625
  • 21/13= 1.6153846…
  • 34/21= 1.61904…
  •  = 1.6180339887498948482045
polya
POLYA:
  • When you want to find a solution to two simultaneous constraints, first characterize the solution space to one of them, and then find a solution to the second that is within the space of the first.
a technique to derive the formula for the fibonacci numbers
A technique to derive the formula for the Fibonacci numbers
  • Fn is defined by two conditions:
  • Base condition: F0=0, F1=1
  • Inductive condition: Fn=Fn-1+Fn-2
forget the base condition and concentrate on satisfying the inductive condition
Forget the base condition and concentrate on satisfying the inductive condition
  • Inductive condition: Fn=Fn-1+Fn-2
  • Consider solutions of the form:
  • Fn= cn for some complex constant c
  • C must satisfy:
  • cn - cn-1 - cn-2 = 0
c n c n 1 c n 2 0
cn - cn-1 - cn-2 = 0
  • iff cn-2(c2 - c1 - 1) = 0
  • iff c=0 or c2 - c1 - 1= 0
  • Iff c = 0, c = , or c = -(1/)
c 0 c or c 1
c = 0, c = , or c = -(1/)
  • So for all these values of c the inductive condition is satisfied:
  • cn - cn-1 - cn-2 = 0
  • Do any of them happen to satisfy the base condition as well? c0=0 and c1=1?

ROTTEN LUCK

slide75
Insight: if 2 functions g(n) and h(n) satisfy the inductive condition then so does a g(n) + b h(n) for all complex a and b
  • (a g(n) + b h(n)) + (a g(n-1) + b h(n-1)) + (a g(n-2) + b h(n-2)) = 0
a b a n b 1 n satisfies the inductive condition
a,b a n + b (-1/ )nsatisfies the inductive condition
  • Set a and b to fit the base conditions.
  • n=0 : a + b = 0
  • n=1 : a 1 + b (-1/ )1 = 1
  • Two equalities in two unknowns (a and b).
  • Now solve for a and b:
  • this gives a = 1/5 b = -1/5
references
REFERENCES
  • Coxeter, H. S. M. ``The Golden Section, Phyllotaxis, and Wythoff's Game.'' Scripta Mathematica19, 135-143, 1953.
  • "Recounting Fibonacci and Lucas
  • Identities" by Arthur T. Benjamin and Jennifer J. Quinn, The CollegeMathematics Journal, Vol. 30, No. 5, 1999, pp. 359--366.