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Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

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Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

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  1. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit Lynn DrakeProgram Manager WTSC

  2. Pocket Bikes • Tiny motorcycles less than three feet long and 24 inches high. • Powered by 40-49cc, two-stroke gas engines or electric motors. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  3. Pocket Bikes • Capable of speeds up to 40 mph. Kits available to boost speed up to 70 mph. • Designed as specialized racing motorbikes for paved, closed-circuit racing courses. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  4. Confusion on applicable laws High concern for law enforcement Too small to be seen in traffic Marketed to children Driven by suspended licensed drivers Noise and safety concerns Nine-year-old Washington boy killed while riding pocket bike on street Pocket Bike Issues Overview Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  5. Is it a motor-driven cycle? RCW 46.04.330 defines motorcycle as: a motor vehicle designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, on which the driver rides astride the motor unit or power train and is designed to be steered with a handle bar, but excluding a farm tractor, a power wheelchair, an electric personal assistive mobility device, and a moped. RCW 46.04.332 defines motor-driven cycle as follows: motorcycle, including every motor scooter, with a motor that produces not to exceed five brake horsepower (developed by a prime mover, as measured by a brake applied to the driving shaft). A motor-driven cycle does not include a moped, a power wheelchair, a motorized foot scooter, or an electric personal assistive mobility device. Applicable Laws Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  6. Applicable Laws • Is it a motorized foot scooter? • RCW 46.04.336 defines motorized foot scooter as follows: a device with no more than two ten-inch or smaller diameter wheels that has handlebars, is designed to be stood or sat upon by the operator, and is powered by an internal combustion engine or electric motor that is capable of propelling the device with or without human propulsion. For purposes of this section, a motor-driven cycle, a moped, an electric-assisted bicycle, or a motorcycle is not a motorized foot scooter.” Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  7. Is it a motor-driven cycle? Yes! Kitsap County Prosecutor’s Office Washington State Patrol Memo dated September 27, 2004 Is it a motorized foot scooter? Yes! Law enforcement officers in Spokane, Olympia, Lacey, and Thurston County have said motorized foot scooter laws apply. Applicable Laws Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  8. Off Road Vehicle • Department of Licensing classifies pocket bikes as off-road vehicles (RCW 46.09) and is in the process of notifying dealers of licensing requirements. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  9. If it’s a Motor-Driven Cycle: • Pocket bikes may not meet many equipment requirements, including: • RCW 46.44.050, Requiring a minimum wheel base of 3’6” • RCW 46.37.523, Requiring a minimum headlamp height of 24” • RCW 46.37.525, Requiring a minimum tail lamp height of 15” • RCW 46.37.400, Requiring two mirrors • RCW 46.37.420, Requiring pneumatic rubber tires • RCW 46.37.380, Requiring horns and warning devices • RCW 46.37.390, Requiring mufflers and noise prevention measures Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  10. If it’s a Motor-Driven Cycle: • Pocket bikes may not be legally operated on public roads, sidewalks, bike lanes, trails, or anyplace prohibiting the use of motorized vehicles. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  11. If it’s a Motorized Foot Scooter: • The pocket bikes would have the same access to roadways as bicycles according to WAC 46.04.336. • Pocket bikes could be further regulated by the local government ordinances that govern motorized foot scooters. Many of these set a minimum age for operation and restrict where the scooters are allowed, such as only allowing them on streets with speed limits of 25 mph or less. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  12. Size of Pocket Bike • The miniature size of these vehicles make them a bad fit for traffic. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  13. Marketed to Children Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  14. Noise and Safety Concerns • Law enforcement officers state that they have received noise complaints about the gas-powered pocket bikes and complaints about the vehicles being driven by children or in an unsafe manner. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  15. Drivers with Suspended Licenses • Law enforcement officers report finding pocket bike drivers choosing pocket bikes because their license has been suspended and they believe no license or registration is required. Some web site sellers encourage this belief. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  16. Motorized Foot Scooters • Like a skate board with a small gas or electric motor, handlebars, a brake, and a hand operated accelerator. • Speeds up to 30+ mph. • Some come with bicycle-like detachable or permanent seats. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  17. State law does not meet Consumer Product Safety Guidelines. Patchwork of local regulations. Marketed to children. Noise and pollution complaints. 10-year-old Kennewick boy killed when scooter crossed in front of truck on 30 mph road. Injuries increasing. Motorized and foot traffic a hazardous mix. Motorized Foot Scooter Issues Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  18. State Motorized Scooter Laws • RCW 46.04.336 Definition, motorized foot scooter "Motorized foot scooter" means a device with no more than two ten-inch or smaller diameter wheels that has handlebars, is designed to be stood or sat upon by the operator, and is powered by an internal combustion engine or electric motor that is capable of propelling the device with or without human propulsion. For purposes of this section, a motor-driven cycle, a moped, an electric-assisted bicycle, or a motorcycle is not a motorized foot scooter.” Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  19. State Motorized Scooter Laws • RCW 46.20.500 Drivers license not required, Reflectors needed at night. No driver license is required to operate a motorized foot scooter. Nighttime use prohibited without reflectors. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  20. State Motorized Scooter Laws • RCW 46.61.710 Vehicle registration and licensing not required, access and access limitations. • Vehicle licensing and registration requirements do not apply to motorized foot scooters. Motorized foot scooters have access to highways to the same extent as bicycles. Motorized foot scooters may not be operated on trails or bicycle paths built with federal funds. Local jurisdictions may restrict access. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  21. Local Motorized Scooter Laws Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  22. Consumer Product Safety Commission • CPSC recommends: • Riders of motorized scooters wear a helmet, knee and elbow pads. • Children under age 12 should not ride a motorized foot scooter. • Scooters should not be ridden in traffic. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  23. Marketed to Children Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  24. Noise and Pollution Concerns Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  25. Mixing Motorized and Foot Traffic Hazardous Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  26. Injuries on the Rise • According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, there were 1,330 emergency room-treated injuries related to motorized scooters in 1999. In 2000, the number of reported injuries climbed to 4,390. However, by 2002, there were 5,900 reported injuries, 40 percent involving children under age 15. The most common injuries involve broken arms, hands, and legs caused by collisions with motor vehicles. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  27. Injuries on the Rise • The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission is aware of at least three deaths associated with motorized scooters. Two of the deaths involved children. None were wearing a helmet. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  28. Questions? • Is the current system working in this state to provide accurate and clear information on regulation and safety concerns for pocket bikes and motorized foot scooters? If not, what is needed? • Do we need statewide clarification on these vehicles? • Is it finally time for a statewide helmet law? Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit

  29. Future Planning • WTSC will convene a meeting between Department of Licensing, Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs, Washington State Patrol, and the State Attorney General’s Office to reach agreement on statewide policies in regard to pocket bikes. Pocket Bike and Motorized Foot Scooter Summit