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John Quincy Adams Brandon Carter Social Studies Carson Gombatz 1 st Period Indu Ramesh Ms. Nagourney Diana Xie Timeline July 11, 1767 1778 1781 1785 1787 1787 1790 1794 - 1801 1797 Born in Braintree, Massachusetts Travels around Europe with father

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john quincy adams

John Quincy Adams

Brandon CarterSocial Studies

Carson Gombatz 1st Period

Indu RameshMs.NagourneyDiana Xie

timeline
Timeline

July 11, 1767

1778

1781

1785

1787

1787

1790

1794 - 1801

1797

Born in Braintree, Massachusetts

Travels around Europe with father

Becomes secretary / interpreter for Francis Dana, first US diplomat assigned to Russia

Attends Harvard

Graduates from Harvard

Starts studying law in Boston

Starts own law office

Becomes diplomat for different countries

Marries Louisa Catherine Johnson

IMAGE SOURCE (from title page): Sterner, Douglas. "John Quincy Adams." 1999. Home of the Heroes. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://www.homeofheroes.com>.

continued
…continued

1806

1803 - ’08

1814

1815 - ’17

1817 - ’25

1825

1828

March 4, 1829

1830

1831

February 23, 1848

Becomes professor of literature at Harvard

Becomes first US minister for Russia

Organizes group to protest against war of 1812. Treaty of Ghrent is created, and stops the war.

Becomes US minister to England

Becomes US Secretary of State

Becomes 6th president of US

Creates the “Tariff of Abominations”

Retires as President

Becomes representative for Massachusetts

Returns to Washington as congress.

Dies in Washington, DC

SOURCE: DeGregorio, William A. Complete Book of US Presidents. 2nd ed. New York: Dembner Books, 1989.

slide4
Jobs
  • secretary
  • interpreter
  • - clerk
  • - lawyer
  • - writer
  • - minister

By the time Adams was 14, he had learned many languages. When he heard that American diplomat Francis Dana was looking for a secretary and interpreter, he took the job.

When Adams was 18, he attended Harvard College. After graduating, he worked at a law office as a clerk and he also learned law.

IMAGE SOURCE: "John Quincy Adams." Wikipedia. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://pl.wikipedia.org/>.

continued5
…continued

He wrote articles in his spare time. These articles attacked opinions. Among the people he attacked was Thomas Paine. Paine accused President George Washington for doing a bad job, but Adams, who signed as “Publicola”, attacked back at Paine with many clever things.

In one article, he wrote “Mr. Paine seems to think it is as easy for a nation to change its government, as for a man to change his coat” (Kent 20).

Many people admired “Publicola” and wondered who he was.

IMAGE SOURCE: "John Quincy Adams." Wikipedia. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://pl.wikipedia.org/>.

continued ii
…continued II

When George Washington found out Adams was Publicola, he became very impressed. He appointed Adams US minister of the Netherlands.

SOURCES:

Coelho, Tony. World Leaders: Past & Present. 1st ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1990.

Kent, Zachary. Encyclopedia of Presidents: John Quincy Adams. 1st ed. Chicago: Children Press Chicago, 1987.

DeGregorio, William A. Complete Book of US Presidents. 2nd ed. New York: Dembner Books, 1989.

personality
Personality

John Quincy Adams was a very obedient man:

At the age of 11, upon his father’s request, John Quincy also began to keep a diary of his daily thoughts and activities, which he maintained with characteristic diligence almost to the day he died. (Coelho 19-20)

Since he wrote in the diary until the day he died, this shows that he loved to write. He also wrote many popular articles too.

  • - hardworking
  • - obedient
  • strict
  • good manners
  • - critical

IMAGE SOURCE: "Presidents." Prints & Photographs Reading Room. Prints & Photographs Division. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/>.

continued8
…continued

John Adams traveled around the world a lot with his father and for diplomatic missions. At the same time, he learned very polite manners and many opinions. He shared these opinions at Harvard College, and at the same time had very nice manners. Some people at Harvard respected and admired Adams for his polite manners and opinions, but others though he was too stiff and snobbish. Since he grew up with many grownups but few children, he often criticized others. Part of the reason why Adams was such an unpopular president was because he was so “independent” and didn’t care what others thought of him.

He also forced himself to work very hard. Some days he would work as many as 12 hours a day, and stay up all night studying.

SOURCES:

Coelho, Tony. World Leaders: Past & Present. 1st ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1990.

Kent, Zachary. Encyclopedia of Presidents: John Quincy Adams. 1st ed. Chicago: Children Press Chicago, 1987.

decisions protecting american industries
Decisions: Protecting American Industries

Reason #2Even Andrew Jackson, John Quincy's rival, supported the bill (178).

What was the problem that caused the decision to need to be made? American industries had to be protected from foreign competition (Armentoet al. 177-178).

What the President did: The President passed the bill.

Reason #1 Factory owners and workers in the North supported the bill (178).

Possible choice #1The President could have ignored the whole situation.

Reason #3The bill protected American industries from foreign competition. Today, it is STILL an important issue (177).

Reason #1 Southerners had few industries and imported manufactured goods. The tarriff bill would be bad for them, so they hated it (178).

What decision did the President have to make? He had to decide on whether to pass an extremely high tariff* bill or not.

Reason #2The bill was so unpopular in some places that it was given a nickname: the "Tarriff of Abominations" (178).

Reason #3There was a danger that the idea start that states could nullify laws of Congress (178).

*list of things that the government can control over imported or exported goods

continued10
…continued

Reason #1This would ensure that American industries would be protected from foreign competition (177).

How would the US be different today?

America might not be as industrialized

What I would do (Possible Choice #2) I would have passed the bill, but I would give financial aid (to the South) and promote industry in the South.

Reason #2 It would serve as a compromise for the North and the South. The North supported the bill and it was passed. The south resented the bill, but with the financial aid, they would be able to pay the tarriff bill. Also, with strengthened industry, they would be importing goods other than manufactured goods.

Reason #3With industry promoted in the South, it (the South) could also grow industrially. This would strengthen not only the South, but the whole country.

SOURCE: Armento, Beverly J., Jacqueline M. Córdova, Jorge Klor J. de Alva, and Gary B. Nash, Franlkin Ng, Christopher L. Salter, Louis E. Wilson, and Karen I. Wixson. A More Perfect Union. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1999.

decisions baltimore and ohio railroad
Decisions: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad

Reason #2To make transportation of goods faster.

What was the problem that caused this decision to be made? There was really no problem that urged the B&O Railroad to be built. The construction wasn’t necessary

What the President did: Built the railroad

Reason #1 To boost economy. America was still changing, and a better economy would benefit America.

Possible choice #1 Choosing not to build the railroad

Reason #3The areas near the railroad would prosper very much.

Reason #1 Too expensive of an investment. Building railroads took a lot a money from the government. A lot of that money could be used for other things.

What decision did the President have to make? Whether or not to build the railroad.

How the US be different today?

The economy and transportation wouldn’t be as good

Reason #2This would make canals and other forms of transportation nearly useless. That means a lot of money and jobs could be risked.

Reason #3The railroads may not prosper. Bad fortune like natural disasters could ruin the work. The railroad might not be popular either.

SOURCE: American Freedom Library Graphic Story of the American President. 2nd ed. Chicago: J.G. Furguson Publishing Company, 1971.

decisions appointing secretary of state
Decisions: Appointing Secretary of State

What was the problem that caused this decision to be made? He needed to appoint a Secretary of State

What the President did: Appointed Henry Clay Secretary of State

Reason #1 He respected Henry Clay.

Reason #2 He helped him get votes.

Possible choice #1 Pick someone totally different

Reason #3He thought he had good ideas.

What decision did the President have to make? To appoint Henry Clay Secretary of State

Reason #1 There were more choices everyone liked

Reason #2More choices that actually got votes in Congress.

Reason #3The person might not do a good job.

continued13
…continued

Possible choice #2 Not appoint a Secretary of State

Reason #1 Stop all controversy

Reason #2Constitution says you don’t have to have a Secretary of State.

Reason #3People might like him better.

SOURCES: all book sources listed in bibliography

decisions roads and highways
Decisions: Roads and Highways

What was the problem that caused this decision to be made? The roads and highways in America were in very bad condition. They needed to be improved (Armento et al.178).

What the President did: He passed a tax, called a tariff, on people to pay for the roads.

Reason #1 He didn't have enough money to pay for road improvement himself.

Possible choice #1 He could have ignored the whole situation.

Reason #2 Taxing the people seemed the only way to pay for road improvement.

What decision did the President have to make? Adams had to decide on how to pay for road improvement.

Reason #1 Even though it was for America's welfare,people could say that the tax was to much and despise it.

Reason #3It was for America's welfare, so people could not complain too much about it.

Reason #2The next Presidents would work out the problem.

Reason #3John Calhoun introduced the idea that states could nullify laws of Congress (178). The states could decide on whether they wanted their roads improved or not.

continued15
…continued

Possible choice #2 (What I would do)The roads were a little out of condition, but were still useful. The money could be used on more important issues.

Reason #1 The roads were a little out of condition,but were still useful. The money could be used on more important issues.

Reason #2The problem was not that big. The roads were not that badly out of condition.

Reason #3The people might hate him for passing the tariff.

SOURCES: all book sources listed in bibliography

bibliography
Bibliography

BOOKS

DeGregorio, William A. Complete Book of US Presidents. 2nd ed. New York: Dembner Books, 1989.

Coelho, Tony. World Leaders: Past & Present. 1st ed. New York: Chelsea House Publishers, 1990.

American Freedom Library Graphic Story of the American President. 2nd ed. Chicago: J.G. Furguson Publishing Company, 1971.

Kent, Zachary. Encyclopedia of Presidents: John Quincy Adams. 1st ed. Chicago: Children Press Chicago, 1987.

Armento, Beverly J. et al. A More Perfect Union. 1st ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1991.

slide17

Armento, Beverly J., Jacqueline M. Córdova, Jorge Klor J. de Alva, and Gary B. Nash, Franlkin Ng, Christopher L. Salter, Louis E. Wilson, and Karen I. Wixson. A More Perfect Union. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1999.

IMAGES (SITES)

Sterner, Douglas. "John Quincy Adams." 1999. Home of the Heroes. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://www.homeofheroes.com>.

"John Quincy Adams." Wikipedia. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://pl.wikipedia.org/>.

"Presidents." Prints & Photographs Reading Room. Prints & Photographs Division. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/>.

Ball, Dr. William J. "John Quincy Adams." Teaching Politics. 20 Nov. 2004 <http://teachpol.tcnj.edu/>.