literacy s beginnings supporting young readers and writers by mcgee and richgels n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Literacy’s Beginnings, Supporting Young Readers and Writers by McGee and Richgels PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Literacy’s Beginnings, Supporting Young Readers and Writers by McGee and Richgels

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 14
Sophia

Literacy’s Beginnings, Supporting Young Readers and Writers by McGee and Richgels - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

242 Views
Download Presentation
Literacy’s Beginnings, Supporting Young Readers and Writers by McGee and Richgels
An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Literacy’s Beginnings, Supporting Young Readers and Writers by McGee and Richgels By: Christina Morrison EDN 340 Dr. Fox

  2. Focus • Development stages from age 6 to 8 • Literacy-Rich Classrooms

  3. Three Phases of Conventional Literacy Development • Early • Transitional • Self-generative

  4. Early Readers and Writers • Read simple text on their own • Pin point and recognize words (High-Frequency) • Sight and decode by letter-sound correspondence • Spell out words, compose longer writings • First grade and early months in second

  5. Transitional • More complex text with longer sentences • More fluent, have acquired sight words • Multiple meanings of words and ways to spell • Begin writing several genres (per. nar., stories, poems, science reports, etc.) • Second grade, finishes developing in third

  6. Self-Generative • Control many strategies for reading complex texts, learning from text, and acquiring new vocabulary • Increasingly able to revise their own writing to communicate for a wide variety of purposes

  7. Constructing Interpretations of Literature • Group discussions, share personal responses • Learn different perspectives from peers • Leads to open minded thinking in future readings • Writing strategies: everyday activities, familiar faces etc can help students be great writers • Connecting this to what they have read

  8. Literacy Rich Classrooms • Important because students become reflective, motivated readers and writers • Use literacy more about themselves and the world they live in

  9. Everyday Routines • Reading aloud • Story telling • Independent reading/writing • Become motivated to read more themselves • Higher vocabulary • Comprehend material using strategies they learned

  10. Routines continued • Sharing experiences • Using props (students can relate to object) • Make own props and rein act the story themselves

  11. Independent Reading/ Writing • Have SSR (sustained silent reading); 10-20 minutes everyone reads • Give each child a journal at the beginning of the year • Time set out to write independently

  12. Encourage Emotional and Intellectual Involvement • Response to literature activities • Expand and enrich students understanding • Ex: writing, drawing, retelling, commenting, questioning, etc. • Classroom writing, library, and computer centers • Curriculum organized around literature content units

  13. Continued • Include multicultural literature • Form variety of groups, whole class gatherings, small groups, and partners • Working alone as well • Incorporating ones with different abilities helps students learn from one another, and help each other out

  14. Works Cited • McGee, L.M., Richgels, D.J. (2004). Literacy's beginnings: supporting young readers and writers. Boston: Pearson.