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Designing, Developing, and Evaluating an Interdisciplinary Digital Library Curriculum. Jeffrey Pomerantz School of Information & Library Science University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill pomerantz@unc.edu. Tapping the vast reservoir of human knowledge --Louis Round Wilson, founder, 1931.

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Designing, Developing, and Evaluating an Interdisciplinary Digital Library Curriculum

Jeffrey Pomerantz

School of Information & Library Science

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

pomerantz@unc.edu

Tapping the vast reservoir of human knowledge --Louis Round Wilson, founder, 1931

slide2
Project team:

UNC: Barbara Wildemuth, Sanghee Oh

VT: Ed Fox, Seungwon Yang

Project advisory board

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. IIS-0535057 (VT) and IIS-0535060 (UNC-CH).

Acknowledgements

slide3
Develop curriculum materials for teaching digital library topics

For use in both LIS and CS programs

Lesson plans, exercises, assignments, etc.

For the classroom, not online

Where is the line between DL curriculum and LIS curriculum?

Introduction to the Project

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11. IM. Information Management (10 core hours)

IM1. Information models and systems (3)

IM2. Database systems (3)

IM3. Data modeling (4)

IM4. Relational databases

IM5. Database query languages

IM6. Relational database design

IM7. Transaction processing

IM8. Distributed databases

IM9. Physical database design

IM10. Data mining

IM11. Information storage and retrieval

IM12. Hypertext and hypermedia

IM13. Multimedia information and systems

IM14. Digital libraries

Computing Curriculum 2001

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Pomerantz, J., Oh, S., Yang, S., Fox, E. A., & Wildemuth, B. M. (2006). The Core: Digital Library Education in Library and Information Science Programs. D-Lib Magazine, 12(11). http://dx.doi.org/10.1045/november2006-pomerantz

Topics of Readings in DL Courses

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Pomerantz, J., Wildemuth, B., Fox, E. A., & Yang, S. (2006). Curriculum Development for Digital Libraries. In Proceedings of the 6th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (pp. 175-184). New York: Association for Computing Machinery. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1141753.1141787

200

JCDL 05

180

JCDL 04

Number of conference papers

JCDL 03

JCDL 02

160

JCDL 01

ACM DL 00

140

ACM DL 99

ACM DL 98

ACM DL 97

120

ACM DL 96

100

80

60

40

20

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Module ID

Topics of Conference Papers

Data Visualization

Collection

Development

Intellectual Property

Architecture

Services

Future of DLs

Metadata

Digital Objects

Preservation

slide8
Pomerantz, J., Wildemuth, B., Fox, E. A., & Yang, S. (2006). Curriculum Development for Digital Libraries. In Proceedings of the 6th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries (pp. 175-184). New York: Association for Computing Machinery. http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1141753.1141787

200

D-Lib 06

180

D-Lib 05

D-Lib 04

D-Lib 03

160

Number of D-Lib articles

D-Lib 02

D-Lib 01

140

D-Lib 00

D-Lib 99

D-Lib 98

120

D-Lib 97

D-Lib 96

100

D-Lib 95

80

60

40

20

0

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Module ID

Topics of Papers in D-Lib Magazine

Data Visualization

Collection

Development

Intellectual Property

Architecture

Services

Future of DLs

Metadata

Digital Objects

Preservation

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Module name

Scope

Learning objectives

Level of effort required

Relationships with other modules

Prerequisite knowledge required

Introductory remedial instruction

Body of knowledge

Resources

Exercises / Learning activities

Evaluation of learning outcomes

Glossary

Contributors

Module Template

Completed modules

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First draft written by a single author.

Module is reviewed by the research team; feedback is provided to the author.

Author makes revisions to the module.

Module is posted on the project wiki for expert evaluation. (Evaluators have been previously recruited.)

Evaluators post comments to the wiki.

Author makes revisions to the module.

Modules are available to be implemented in the classroom.

Module Development Process

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Modules are available to be implemented in the classroom.

Instructor decides to use a module, modifies it to suit their teaching.

After the module is used in class:

Students are emailed to fill out an online survey.

Instructors are interviewed.

Graded student work is collected, if any.

Module Evaluation Process

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Evaluation: Student Survey

  • Clearly outlined objectives and outcomes were provided.
  • The module was well-organized.
  • The amount of work required for this module was appropriate.
  • The assigned readings helped me better understand the subject matter.
  • Given the module’s objectives, the learning activities and/or assignments were appropriate.
  • The learning activities and/or assignments required thinking and understanding.
  • The learning activities and/or assignments were stimulating.
  • Assignments for this module helped me understand what will be expected of me as a professional.
  • I learned useful professional skills from this module.
  • I know significantly more about this subject than before I took this module.
  • Class lectures added to my understanding of the subject.
  • I gained a good understanding of the basic concepts related to this subject.
  • I learned to interrelate important issues related to this subject.
  • This module stimulated me to think critically about the subject matter.
  • I feel that this learning module served my needs well.
  • I was very satisfied with this learning module.
  • Overall, considering its content, design, and structure, this module was effective.
slide16

Evaluation: Instructor Interview

  • Objectives
  • Body of knowledge
  • Readings
  • Learning Activities
  • Logistics
  • Overall structure of the module
slide17

Evaluation: Assigned Work

  • Analyzed with respect to the objectives of the module.
  • Triangulated with the student survey data as a check on both.
slide18
Biannual meetings of the advisory board & others, at ASIST & JCDL conferences

Recruiting module authors, expert evaluators, and instructors

Administrative Issues

slide19
Continue to develop modules

Develop community of interest

How to keep a community of interest interested?

Where to host modules in the long term?

Wikibooks, Wikiversity, learning object repositories?

Future Work

slide20
NSF Workshop in November

EU-US ATLANTIS Programme

Transatlantic Degree Consortia Project

IMLS and/or Mellon Foundation

Problem-based learning curriculum, internships

Future Work

slide21
Project site: curric.dlib.vt.edu

Includes links to all publications

Project wiki: curric.dlib.vt.edu/wiki/

Includes all modules ready to be used & being evaluated

This presentation: www.ils.unc.edu/~jpom/conf/Pomerantz_LIDA2008.ppt

Project URLs

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Thank You!

Jeffrey Pomerantz

School of Information & Library Science

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

pomerantz@unc.edu

Tapping the vast reservoir of human knowledge --Louis Round Wilson, founder, 1931