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This presentation is powered by “mouse clicks”. Created by Jo Black . Recipe Math Worksheet. Food preparation and math go hand in hand. Basic math skills can help you understand the units of measure given in recipes. Basic math can also help you to make changes in a recipe.

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This presentation is powered by “mouse clicks”.

Created by Jo Black

Recipe Math Worksheet


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Recipe Math


During this presentation you will discover l.jpg
During this presentation you will discover:

  • Two basic systems of measurement

  • Units of measurement commonly used in recipes

  • How to increase and decrease recipes

Recipe Math


Key terms l.jpg
Key Terms

  • Customary system

  • Metric system

  • Equivalent

System of measurement most commonly used in the US

System of measurement most commonly used in most of the world. It’s also used by scientists and health professionals.

Same as

Recipe Math


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Key Terms cont’d

  • Volume

  • Weight

  • Yield

The amount of space an ingredient takes up

How heavy or light an ingredient is

The number of servings a recipe makes

Recipe Math


Volume l.jpg
Volume

  • In the customary system the basic units for measuring volume include:

  • Many recipe ingredients are measured by volume.

Tablespoons (Tbsp. or T.)

Teaspoons (tsp. or t.)

Fluid ounces (fl. oz.)

Gallons (gal.)

Quarts (qt.)

Cups (c.)

Pints (pt.)

Recipe Math


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Volume cont’d

  • In the metric system the basic units for measuring volume include:

Milliliters (mL)

Liters (L)

Recipe Math


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Measuring Spoons

Liquid measuring Cups

Dry measuring Cups

Measuring Volume

  • Equipment for measuring volume includes:

Recipe Math


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Measuring Volume Customary System

  • Dry Measuring Cups come in the following four standard sizes:

Recipe Math


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Measuring Volume Customary System

  • Measuring spoons come in the following five standard sizes:

Recipe Math


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Measuring Volume

  • Liquid measuring cups come in a variety of sizes. Often they are marked with both customary & metric measurements:

Recipe Math


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Measuring Volume Metric System

  • Dry Measuring cups come in the following three standard sizes:

Recipe Math


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Measuring Volume Metric System

  • Measuring spoons come in the following five standard sizes:

Recipe Math


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VOLUME EQUIVALENTS TABLE

2

1

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

jjjjjj

27

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28

29

30


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Weight

  • Scales are used to measure weight.

  • Many food packages are labeled according to how much they weigh.

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Weight cont’d

  • In the customary system the basic units for measuring weight are:

Pounds (lb.)

Ounces (oz.)

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Specialnote about Ounces

  • Notice that the term “ounces” is used in two different ways – to measure weight (oz.) and volume (fl. oz.).

  • The two kinds of ounces are not the same.

  • When a recipe calls for ounces, be sure you understand whether you’re to measure by weight or volume.

Recipe Math


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Weight cont’d

  • In the metric system the basic units for measuring weight are:

Kilograms (kg)

Grams (g)

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WEIGHT EQUIVALENTS TABLE

1

2

3

4

2

6

7

8

9

Recipe Math


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Increasing Recipes

  • How many servings do you want?

  • That’s the first important question you have to ask yourself when you decide to increase or decrease a recipe.

Recipe Math


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Increasing Recipescont’d

  • Suppose you need enough pasta salad for seven people.

  • Your pasta recipe makes 4 servings.

  • The math to make eight servings is easier.

Recipe Math


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Calculating New Amounts

  • You’ve decided to make 8 servings.

  • Eight servings is your desired yield.

  • Use the desired yield and the original yield in this formula:

Magic number =

the number to multiply each ingredient by

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Calculating New Amounts cont’d

  • The equation would look like this:

Multiply the amount of each ingredient of the pasta recipe by the “magic number” 2.

Recipe Math


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Decreasing Recipes

  • The same formula works when you are decreasing a recipe.

  • Suppose a tuna casserole recipe you have makes 12 servings. How would you adjust it to make 4?

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Calculating New Amounts cont’d

  • The equation would look like this:

Magic number =

the number to multiply each ingredient by

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Calculating New Amounts cont’d

Multiply the amount of each ingredient of the tuna casserole recipe by the “magic number” 0.33.

Recipe Math


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Converting Amounts

  • When adjusting a recipe, you may sometimes need to convert a measurement to an equivalent amount.

  • Suppose the recipe for tuna casserole calls for ½ cup of milk.

  • If you multiply ½ by 1/3, you get 1/6 cup. You don’t have a 1/6 cup measuring tool!

Recipe Math


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Converting Amounts cont’d

  • Begin by converting the ½ cup into tablespoons. Look at the Volume Equivalent Table you have.

  • One cup equals 16 tablespoons, so ½ cup equals 8 tablespoons.

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Converting Amounts cont’d

  • Now you can multiply the 8 tablespoons by 1/3:

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Converting Amounts cont’d

  • Now what do you do with the 2/3 of a tablespoon?

  • Three teaspoons equal 1 tablespoon.

  • You can convert the 2/3 Tbsp into 2 teaspoons.

Recipe Math


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What if it doesn’t come out even?

  • Sometimes an amount can’t be decreased easily.

  • You might end up with an amount like ½ an egg. What should you do then?

Recipe Math


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If it doesn’t come out even? cont’d

  • With mixtures such as casseroles, stews, salads or soups, exact amounts usually aren’t critical.

  • You could probably use a whole egg instead of half with good results.

Recipe Math


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If it doesn’t come out even? cont’d

  • Baked goods such as cookies, cakes or breads depend on exact amounts.

  • If you have to round off amounts or can only change some of the ingredients, the recipe maynot turn out.

Recipe Math


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If it doesn’t come out even? cont’d

  • If a recipe can’t be increased or decreased easily, think of another way to solve the problem.

  • How might you solve the problem?

Recipe Math


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A Solution

  • Instead of trying to prepare half of a recipe, you might prepare the entire amount and freeze half to use later.

Recipe Math


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BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • Kowtaluk, H. (2001). Discovering food and nutrition. 6th ed. New York: Glencoe McGraw-Hill.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Feb. 26, 2005, from http://images.amazon.com/images/P/B00004RHQ8.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Feb. 26, 2005, from http://fantes.com/images/7176-2measuring_cups.jpg.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Feb. 26, 2005, from http://rosemania.com/shopsite_sc/store/html/media/MeasuringSpoons.jpg.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Feb. 26, 2005, from http://www.ogormans.co.uk/images/scales.jpg.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Feb. 26, 2005, from http://www.ogormans.co.uk/images/scales.jpg.

Recipe Math


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BIBLIOGRAPHY

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Dec. 17, 2004, from http://www.spaghetti.it/images/spaghetti-b.jpg.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Feb. 26, 2005, from http://www.maggiemoosrichmond.com/cakes-oreo.jpg.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Dec. 17, 2004, fromhttp://www.panerabread.com/menu_breads.aspx.

  • (n.d.). Clip Art. Retrieved Feb. 26, 2005, from

  • http://office.microsoft.com/clipart/default.aspx?lc=en-us.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Dec. 17, 2004, fromhttp://graphics.jsonline.com/graphics/owlive/img/jan04/soup_peanut_012104_big.jpg.

  • (n.d.). Retrieved Dec. 17, 2004, fromhttp://www.beechenhill.co.uk/newimages/large/dovedalebeefstew.jpg.

Recipe Math