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In a rugby union match there are four ways to score A penalty or drop goal is worth 3 points A try is worth 5 poin

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In a rugby union match there are four ways to score A penalty or drop goal is worth 3 points A try is worth 5 poin - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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In a rugby union match there are four ways to score A penalty or drop goal is worth 3 points A try is worth 5 points A converted try is worth 7 points. The RBS Six Nations rugby tournament runs from February 7 th to March 21 st 2009. In November 2008 England played Australia.

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Presentation Transcript
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In a rugby union match there are four ways to score

A penalty or drop goal is worth 3 points

A try is worth 5 points

A converted try is worth 7 points

The RBS Six Nations rugby tournament runs from February 7th to March 21st 2009

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In November 2008 England played Australia

A penalty or drop goal scores 3 points

A try scores 5 points

A converted try scores 7 points

Good match isn’t it Steve? Shame John’s missing it…

Hold on, here comes John now. Late again.

Sorry I’m late guys -Who scored the try and the penalties?

John arranged to meet some friends to watch the match.

He got held up and, when he arrived late, the score was12 – 11 to Australia

When John asked about the English try and the two penalties his friends didn’t believe that he hadn’t been watching the match somewhere else.

The game finished 28 – 14 to Australia

How many tries, converted tries and penalties or drop goals could Australia have scored?

How was John able to know how the 11 points had been scored?

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To score their 14 points England scored one try, two penalties and a drop goal

A penalty or drop goal scores 3 points

A try scores 5 points

A converted try scores 7 points

That’s one 5 point score and three 3 point scores

How many other ways are there to score 14 points?

How can you be sure you’ve got them all?

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A penalty or drop goal scores 3 points

A try scores 5 points

A converted try scores 7 points

  • Explore how different scores can be achieved.
  • You might want to include
  • What’s the first score that can be made in more than one way?
  • What’s the first score that can be made in three different ways?
  • What scores are not possible?
  • If two teams draw but one team has scored all of their points by drop goals and the other has scored all of theirs by converted tries, what might the scores have been?
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Try, Try and Try AgainIntroduction: The RBS Six Nations has put rugby on the back pages again. This resource uses the Rugby Union scoring structure as the context for an investigation into numbers and number properties.Content objectives: - recognise and use multiples, factors, primes (less than 100), common factors, highest common factors and lowest common multiples in simple cases; use simple tests of divisibility - classify and visualise properties and patterns; generalise in simple cases by working logically; draw simple conclusions and explain reasoning - use logical argument to interpret the mathematics in a given context or to establish the truth of a statement; give accurate solutions appropriate to the context or problem; evaluate the efficiency of alternative strategies and approaches.Process objectives: These will depend on the way in which you structure the activity. It might be worth considering how you’re going to deliver the activity and highlighting the processes that this will allow on the diagram below.
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Up2d8 mathsTry, Try and Try AgainStudent resource sheets

There are no student resource sheets to accompany Try, Try and Try Again.