THIRD MISSIONARY JOURNEY
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THIRD MISSIONARY JOURNEY. VII. Acts 18:23- 21-14. three main parts – The Ephesus phase , where he worked for two years, The Macedonian and Corinth phase Return journey to Jerusalem.

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three main parts –

The Ephesus phase, where he worked for two years,

The Macedonian and Corinth phase

Return journey to Jerusalem


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  • Act 19:8 And he entered into the synagogue, and spake boldly for the space of three months, reasoning and persuading as to the things concerning the kingdom of God.

  • Act 19:9 But when some were hardened and disobedient, speaking evil of the Way before the multitude, he departed from them, and separated the disciples, reasoning daily in the school of Tyrannus.


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The Christian Congregation at Tyrannus Hall that all they that dwelt in Asia heard the word of the Lord, both Jews and Greeks.

Acts 19:8-10

And entering the synagogue Paul spent three months speaking boldly, arguing and pleading with them about the kingdom of God; but some were stubborn and disbelieved, slandering the Way before the congregation.

That's why he turned from them, taking the disciples along, and on a daily basis continued teaching in the hall of Tyran'nus. This continued for two years, so that all the residents of Asia heard the word of the Lord, both Jews and Greeks.


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According to one source, the "Hall of Tyrannus," where Paul had daily discussions (Acts 19:9), was mentioned in a 1st century inscription as located just east of the library site. Nothing remains of this structure today.


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  • Act 19:11 had daily discussions (Acts 19:9), was mentioned in a 1st century inscription as located just east of the library site. Nothing remains of this structure today. And God wrought special miracles by the hands of Paul:

  • Act 19:12 insomuch that unto the sick were carried away from his body handkerchiefs or aprons, and the evil spirits went out.


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  • These seven men of Ephesus were all sons of Sceva, a Jewish chief priest.

  • Jewish mysticism has historically been tinged by large doses of magic, superstition, and demonology. Can we capture the spiritual while avoiding the superstitious? Where does magic leave off and mysticism begin? Can we build a liberal faith that allows for angels and miracles?


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    • Act 19:13 But certain also of the strolling Jews, exorcists, took upon them to name over them that had the evil spirits the name of the Lord Jesus, saying, I adjure you by Jesus whom Paul preacheth.

    • Act 19:14 And there were seven sons of one Sceva, a Jew, a chief priest, who did this.

    Ba'al Shem Tov


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    • Act 19:15 And the evil spirit answered and said unto them, Jesus I know, and Paul I know, but who are ye?

    • Act 19:16 And the man in whom the evil spirit was leaped on them, and mastered both of them, and prevailed against them, so that they fled out of that house naked and wounded.

    • Act 19:17 And this became known to all, both Jews and Greeks, that dwelt at Ephesus; and fear fell upon them all, and the name of the Lord Jesus was magnified.

    • Act 19:18 Many also of them that had believed came, confessing, and declaring their deeds.


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    • Jesus I know, and Jesus I know, and Paul I know, but who are ye? Paul I know, but who are ye?


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    Erastus: City Treasurer of Corinth magic arts. (19:19).

    Acts 19.22

    Paul sends two assistants, Erastus and Timothy, to visit the churches in Macedonia.

    This is the only time that Erastus is mentioned in Acts, although he is mentioned twice in Paul’s letters. At the close of the letter to the Christians at Rome, Paul states that Erastus is the treasurer of the city from which he is writing, which is the city of Corinth.

    Then, at the end of his second letter to Timothy, Paul records that Erastus stayed behind after Paul left Corinth.


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    During an archeological excavation of Corinth in 1929, a first century pavement was uncovered which contains the following inscription: "Erastus, Procurator and Aedile, laid this pavement at his own expense." The pavement was in the public square and Erastus had apparently paid for it in return for his election to the aedileship.


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    Inscription at Corinth to Erastus first century pavement was uncovered which contains the following inscription: "Erastus, Procurator and Aedile, laid this pavement at his own expense." The pavement was in the public square and Erastus had apparently paid for it in return for his election to the aedileship. (Romans 16.23, Acts 19.22, 2 Timothy 4.20)


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    • Demetrius, shrines of Diana, the mob--vv. 23-41 first century pavement was uncovered which contains the following inscription: "Erastus, Procurator and Aedile, laid this pavement at his own expense." The pavement was in the public square and Erastus had apparently paid for it in return for his election to the aedileship.

    Demetrius The Idol Merchant


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    • Paul revisits Macedonia--Acts 20:1-5 first century pavement was uncovered which contains the following inscription: "Erastus, Procurator and Aedile, laid this pavement at his own expense." The pavement was in the public square and Erastus had apparently paid for it in return for his election to the aedileship.


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    Troas first century pavement was uncovered which contains the following inscription: "Erastus, Procurator and Aedile, laid this pavement at his own expense." The pavement was in the public square and Erastus had apparently paid for it in return for his election to the aedileship.


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    • Paul at Troas first century pavement was uncovered which contains the following inscription: "Erastus, Procurator and Aedile, laid this pavement at his own expense." The pavement was in the public square and Erastus had apparently paid for it in return for his election to the aedileship.

    • Acts 20:6-12

    Mentioned six times in the bible it is the place, On his second missionary journey, where Paul had a vision of a man of Macedonia standing and begging him, "Come over to Macedonia and help us." Acts 16.9, which was the first time that Paul preached the gospel in Europe (Philippi, Thessalonica, Berea, Athens). It is also the start of the 'we' section in Acts 16:10 so it is likely that Luke joined Paul at Alexandria Troas. It is also known as the place where Eutychus fell down from the third storey as the apostle Paul preached on and on until midnight (Acts 20:6 - 10) this was during Paul's third missionary journey. See also the other biblical references to Troas in 2 Cor 2:12 and 2 Tim 4:13.


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    • Paul at Troas first century pavement was uncovered which contains the following inscription: "Erastus, Procurator and Aedile, laid this pavement at his own expense." The pavement was in the public square and Erastus had apparently paid for it in return for his election to the aedileship.

    • Acts 20:6-12

    Mentioned six times in the bible it is the place, On his second missionary journey, where Paul had a vision of a man of Macedonia standing and begging him, "Come over to Macedonia and help us." Acts 16.9, which was the first time that Paul preached the gospel in Europe (Philippi, Thessalonica, Berea, Athens). It is also the start of the 'we' section in Acts 16:10 so it is likely that Luke joined Paul at Alexandria Troas. See also the other biblical references to Troas in 2 Cor 2:12 and 2 Tim 4:13.


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    Eutychus fell down from the third storey as the apostle Paul preached on and on until midnight (Acts 20:6 - 10)


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    Miletus is also renowned as the first city to which the principles of modern town-planning were applied.

    The gridplan introduced by Hippodamos was later to form the basis of town-planning in all Roman cities.


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    (Act 21:1) And when we had parted from them and set sail, we came by a straight course to Cos, and the next day to Rhodes, and from there to Pat'ara.


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    (Act 21:2) And having found a ship crossing to Phoeni'cia, we went aboard, and set sail.

    (Act 21:3) When we had come in sight of Cyprus, leaving it on the left we sailed to Syria, and landed at Tyre; for there the ship was to unload its cargo.


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    (Act 21:4) And having sought out the disciples, we stayed there for seven days. Through the Spirit they told Paul not to go on to Jerusalem.

    (Act 21:5) And when our days there were ended, we departed and went on our journey; and they all, with wives and children, brought us on our way till we were outside the city; and kneeling down on the beach we prayed and bade one another farewell.


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    (Act 21:6) Then we went on board the ship, and they returned home.

    (Act 21:7) When we had finished the voyage from Tyre, we arrived at Ptolema'is; and we greeted the brethren and stayed with them for one day.


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    (Act 21:8) On the morrow we departed and came to Caesare'a; and we entered the house of Philip the evangelist, who was one of the seven, (one of the seven men who had been chosen to help take care of the widows in Jerusalem along with Stephen)and stayed with him.

    Acts 6:1-6 - Appointed to distribute food Acts 8:5-13 - In Samaria (converted Simon Magnus)

    Acts 8:26-40 - The Ethiopian eunuch



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    Eusebius, a Christian historian writing in the third century, quotes Papias, a Christian leader of the early second century, as stating that

    Philip’s daughters were still alive in his time. According to Papias, people would journey to visit them, to listen to their stories about the early church.

    Polycrates, a second-century bishop of Ephesus, says that Philip, "one of the Twelve", was buried at Hierapolis along with two aged virgin daughters of his, and that a third daughter, a prophetess, was buried at Ephesus.


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    Agabus century, quotes Papias, a Christian leader of the early second century, as stating that –

    A "prophet," probably one of the seventy disciples of Christ.

    He prophesied at Antioch of an approaching famine (Acts 11:27, 28).

    Many years afterwards he met Paul at Caesarea, and warned him of the bonds and affliction that awaited him at Jerusalem should he persist in going thither (Acts 21:10-12).


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    Entrance to the Cave of St. Paul at Ephesus century, quotes Papias, a Christian leader of the early second century, as stating that

    The cave was discovered in 1906.


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    Karl Herold, head of the restoration department for the Austrian Archaeological Institute excavations in Ephesus, was working on the cave walls when he noticed that there were paintings underneath the plaster. Removing it, Herold uncovered pictures of Mary, St. Paul, and St. Theoklia, a female disciple, together with some ancient inscriptions.



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    St. Theoklia side-by-side


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    St. Paul's letter to the Romans c. AD 180-200  side-by-sideGreek text on papyrus 


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    Jewish exorcists who tried to heal in the name of Jesus as Paul did, but were unsuccessful (Acts 19:13-16).


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    Post-New Testament tradition holds that John, the disciple of Jesus, brought Mary, the mother of Jesus, to Ephesus to live and wrote the fourth gospel there. In his later years, according to tradition, John was exiled to Patmos, wrote the Johannine Epistles, the Revelation, and combated Gnostic heretics. We visited the traditional site of "Mary's house," now a venerated shrine.


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    At the end of the road from the Magnesia Gate to the Bulbul mountain ( Mt. Koressos) you will come across the House of Virgin Mary.

    According to the records of the Christian Council, Virgin Mary lived in this house until she died at the age of 64. It is widely believed that she left Jerusalem with St.John after Jesus was crucified. St. John wrote in Bible that Virgin Mary was entrusted to him by Jesus himself before crucification. It was also recorded in the Council documents that she lived in a house next to the Council Church inside Ephesus before moving into the house on Bulbul mountain.

    The research on the age of the the foundations of the building shows that the original house was built in the 1st century A.D. but the walls and the roof were renovated during the following centuries.