Download
far s n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
FAR’s PowerPoint Presentation

FAR’s

243 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

FAR’s

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. FAR’s Federal Aviation Regulations “fun stuff” Written for the Notre Dame Pilot Initiative By the Pilots of the University of Notre Dame “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  2. FAA/FARs • Federal Aviation Administration • Federal Aviation Regulations • Rules that apply to aviation, flight operations, construction of aircraft, training, and pilot certificates. • FARs are rules contained in the CFR – Code of Federal Regulations. “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  3. Development • FAR’s are enforceable regulatory laws of the United States • The FAA along with the DOT is allowed to issue and revise FAR’s • Before FAR’s become law they are published in the Notices to Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) for a period of time. • FAR texts are available directly from the FAA, via the FSDO or Internet • FAR’s contain many sections, however the parts most relevant to you as private pilots are 61, 91, and NTSB 830. “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  4. FARs • These two sections are: • FAR Part 61 (how we get our license) • FAR Part 91 (how we lose our license) “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  5. FAR Part 61 • Governs the certification for pilots, flight instructors, and ground instructors • Includes: • Change of Name and Address Regulations • Medical Certificates • Additional Training • Logbooks • Flight Reviews • Flight Experience and PIC • Night Operations “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  6. Definitions • Category • Broad classification of aircraft • Airplane • Rotorcraft • Glider • Class • Classification of aircraft within a category with similar operating characteristics • Single-Engine • Multi-Engine • Type • Required for: • Large Aircraft • Turbojet powered airplanes • Other aircraft specified by the Administrator (Marion Blakey) • Aircraft Specific • i.e. B757 “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  7. Private Pilot Requirements • FAR §61.102 – 61.117 • Covers applicability, eligibility, aeronautical knowledge, flight proficiency, aeronautical experience, etc… • Airplane Single Engine: • 40 Hours Total • 20 with a CFI • 10 Solo Hours “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  8. Change of Name or Address • FAR 61.25 – Change of Name • Send an application for name change accompanied by: • Current airman certificate • Copy of marriage license, court order or other document verifying name change • FAR 61.60 – Change of Address • Pilot, flight instructor, or ground instructor may not exercise certificate privileges unless the FAA is notified in writing within 30 days of address change. “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  9. Change of Address Form “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  10. FAR 61.23 - Medical Certificates • First Class • Required for Airline Transport Pilot privileges • Valid for 6 calendar months for pilots 40 and over • Valid for 12 calendar months for pilots under 40 • After expiring becomes Second class • Second Class • Required for Commercial Pilot Privileges • Valid for 12 calendar months • After 12 calendar months becomes Third class • Third Class • Required for Student (Solo), Recreational, and Private Pilot privileges • Valid for 24 calendar months for pilots 40 and over • Valid for 60 calendar months for pilots under 40 “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  11. FAR 61.31 - Additional Training • Operation of Complex airplanes (retractable gear, flaps, and constant speed propeller) • Received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized CFI • Received a one time endorsement from CFI certifying proficiency • Operation of high performance airplanes (one engine of more than 200 horse power) • Received and logged ground instruction and flight training from an authorized CFI • Received a one time endorsement from CFI certifying proficiency “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  12. FAR 61.31 - Additional Training (cont.) • Operation of tailwheel airplanes • Received and logged flight training from an authorized CFI • Received a one time endorsement from CFI certifying proficiency • Operation of pressurized aircraft (high-altitude endorsement - above 25,000 MSL) • Received and logged ground and flight training from an authorized CFI • Received a one time endorsement from CFI certifying proficiency “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  13. FAR 61.51 – Pilot Logbooks • Purpose of logbook is to demonstrate currency and qualification for additional certificates/ratings • Presentation of documents for inspection • Logbook, pilot certificate, medical certificate, or other • Reasonable request from Administrator, authorized NTSB agent, federal, state, or local law enforcement officer “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  14. FAR 61.56 – Flight Reviews • No person may act as pilot in command unless • They have accomplished a flight review in the preceding 24 calendar months • They have a logbook endorsement from the authorized flight instructor who gave the review, certifying that the person has satisfactorily completed the review • Flight Review Syllabus • Minimum of one hour of flight instruction on maneuvers that the CFI feels are appropriate for the certificate privileges being exercised. • Minimum of one hour of ground instruction on Part 91 of the FARs “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  15. FAR 61.57 – Recent Flight Experience as Pilot In Command • General Experience for Carrying Passengers • Three takeoffs and landings within the preceding 90 days in the same category and class • Accomplished a flight review in preceding 24 calendar months – see FAR 61.56 • Night Experience for Carrying Passengers • Three takeoffs and landing to a full stop within the preceding 90 days in the same category and class • Accomplished a flight review in the preceding 24 calendar months – see FAR 61.56 • Tail Wheel Aircraft – must be to a full stop day and night! “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  16. Night Ops • FAR 61.51 – Logging of Night Time • One hour after civil sunset • One hour before civil sunrise • FAR 91.209 – Aircraft light • Required for operation from sunset to sunrise • Turn on position lights • Turn on anti-collision light (strobes), if available • (unless PIC determines it’s in interest of safety to turn off) “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  17. FAR Part 91 • Responsibility of PIC • Dropping of Objects • Alcohol and Drugs • Preflight Action • Use of Seatbelts • Fuel Requirements • MSA’s • Required Documents • Compliance with ATC Clearances • ELT’s • Oxygen Requirements • Inspections “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  18. FAR 91.3 PIC Responsibility • Directly responsible for, and the final authority as to the operation of the aircraft • In an emergency, PIC may deviate from any stated rule to meet that emergency “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  19. FAR 91.15 Dropping of Objects • No PIC may allow an object to dropped from an aircraft that creates a hazard to persons or property • An object may be dropped if reasonable precautions are taken to avoid injury or damage to persons or property “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  20. FAR 91.17 – Alcohol and Drugs • No person may act as crew • Within 8 hours of drinking alcoholic beverages • While under the influence of alcohol or drugs • While having 0.04% (by weight) alcohol level in blood • Only in an emergency is the PIC allowed to carry a person under the influence of drugs and alcohol • Crew members must submit to drug/alcohol testing if requested to do so by law enforcement officer “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  21. FAR 91.103 Preflight Action • Each PIC shall, before beginning a flight, become familiar with all available information about the flight including: • Weather reports • Fuel requirements • Alternates • Traffic delays • Runway lengths at airports of intended use • Takeoff and landing information in POH “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  22. FAR 91.107 Use of Seat Belts, Shoulder Harnesses, and Child Restraint Systems • No PIC may take off unless he/she ensures that each person on board is briefed on how to fasten and unfasten that person’s safety belt and, if installed, their shoulder harness • No PIC may move on the surface, take off, or land unless PIC ensures that each person on board has been notified to fasten that person’s safety belt and, if installed, their shoulder harness “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  23. Fuel Requirements • VFR Requirements Part 91.151 • DAY TIME - Must have enough fuel on board to fly to original intended point of landing and 30 minutes beyond that point • NIGHT TIME – 45 mins • IFR Requirements Part 91.167 • Fly to airport of intended landing, then fly to the alternate filed at normal cruise, then 45 minutes thereafter. “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  24. FAR 91.113 – Right of Way Rules • An aircraft in distress has right of way over all other aircraft • An aircraft being over taken has the right of way and must be passed on the right • When two aircraft of the same category are converging, but not head-on, the aircraft to the left shall give way • When two aircraft of the same category are converging on a head-on collision course, both aircraft shall give way to the right • The least maneuverable aircraft normally has the right of way: • balloon over glider over aircraft refueling in flight over airship over airplane over rotorcraft • When two or more aircraft are approaching an airport for landing, the right of way belongs to the aircraft at the lower altitude “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  25. “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  26. “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  27. FAR 91.119 Minimum Safe Altitudes • The minimum safe altitude anywhere must allow an emergency landing, following an engine failure, without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface. • Congested area – • 1,000 ft. in a 2,000 ft. radius • Uncongested area- • 500 ft. • Over sparsely populated areas or open water – • 500 ft. of any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure. “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  28. FAR 91.123 Compliance with ATC Clearances • When an ATC clearance has been obtained, no PIC may deviate from that clearance unless: • An amended clearance is obtained • An emergency exists • Deviation is in response to a traffic alert and collision avoidance system resolution advisory • When PIC is uncertain of an ATC clearance, PIC should request clarification • ATC clearances are not authorization to deviate from the rules “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  29. Required Airman Documents • Pilot Certificate • Medical Certificate • Government issued ID “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  30. Required Aircraft Documents • Use the Mnemonic A-R-O-W • Airworthiness certificate • Registration certificate • Operating handbook (POH) • Weight and Balance data “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  31. Required Aircraft Instruments DAY VFR • TOMATO FLAMES • Tachometer • Oil Pressure • Manifold Pressure • Altitude Indicator • Temperature Gauges (liquid-cooled engines) • Oil Temperature (air-cooled engines) • Fuel Gauges • Landing light position indicator (if applicable) • Airspeed Indicator • Magnetic Compass • ELT • Seat Belts NIGHT VFR • Day VFR + • FLAPS • Fuses • Landing Lights (for hire) • Anti-collision lights • Position lights • Source of Power “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  32. FAR 91.207 - ELTs • Emergency Locator Transmitter • Operates on 121.5 Mhz (or 406 Mhz) • ELT batteries must be: • Inspected every 12 calendar months • Replaced after one hour of continuous use or after 50% of useful life has expired as determined by manufacturer • Aircraft cannot be flown without a functioning ELT, except: • When being ferried to another airport for ELT installations, replacement, or repair • Only aircrews may fly on the ferry flight, no passengers “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  33. FAR 91.211 – Use of Oxygen • Flight crews must use oxygen • 12,500 ft MSL up to and including 14,000 ft MSL for more than 30 mins • Above 14,000 ft MSL at all times • Passengers must be provided oxygen • Above 15,000 ft MSL • Altitudes shown above are cabin pressure altitudes “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  34. Aircraft Inspections • FAR 91.409 Airframe and Powerplant Inspections • Every 12 calendar months (annual) • Every 100 hrs for aircraft used for hire • FAR 91.411 Pitot-Static System Tests and Inspection • Every 24 calendar months • FAR 91.413 Transponder Tests and Inspection • Every 24 calendar months “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  35. NTSB 830 • Immediate notification to a National Safety Board field office in the event of the following: • Aircraft accident • Any of the following incidents • Flight control system or malfunction • Inability of flight crew member to perform flight duties due to injury or illness • In-flight fire • Mid-air collision • Damage to other property (not aircraft) of more than $25,000 “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”

  36. BE GREAT AND CONCENTRATE! “Teaching the Science, Inspiring the Art, Producing Aviation Candidates!”