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Noise 101, Part 6 What exactly is “Stage 3”? Prepared by .. SDIA Airport Noise Mitigation Office Overview In late 1960s, increasing noise complaints from communities due to the introduction of jet aircraft led Congress to require FAA to impose rules to control aircraft noise.

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slide1
Noise 101, Part 6 What exactly is “Stage 3”?

Prepared by .. SDIA Airport Noise Mitigation Office

overview
Overview
  • In late 1960s, increasing noise complaints from communities due to the introduction of jet aircraft led Congress to require FAA to impose rules to control aircraft noise.
    • 1972 – Noise Control Act - reaffirmed and strengthened amendment to Federal Aviation Act
congressional mandate
Congressional Mandate
  • FAA wrote regulations implementing Congressional legislation
    • Designed a system to categorizelarge, commercial air service aircraft by the amount of noise produced (Stage 1 – Stage 3)
    • Addressed the phase out of Stage 1 and 2 aircraft by January 1, 2000
faa classification
FAA Classification
  • The FAA classifies aircraft into three stages for clarification: Stage 1, 2, and 3 in order from loudest to the least noisiest.
  • Noise levels for Stage definition of aircraft are measured at three points. These points are designed to measure noise levels for take-off, approach, and flyovers (sideline). Furthermore, classification is also based on the aircraft weight and number of engines.
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First generation jet aircraft

Stage 1

Boeing 707

Douglas DC-8

Boeing 737-100

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Boeing 727

Second Generation

Jets

DC-9

Stage 2

Boeing 747

Boeing 737-200

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AIRBUS 300

MD-90

Stage 3

Boeing 757

Boeing 767F

MD-80

stage 3 criteria
Stage 3 Criteria
  • Affects large, commercial air service aircraft GTW >75,000 lbs operate in the continental U.S. Foreign carriers must meet this requirement on the aircraft they operate in the U.S.
  • All such aircraft must meet the noise requirements of Stage 3 not later than January 1, 2000
factors affecting stage 3
Factors Affecting Stage 3
  • Aircraft weight
    • The heavier the airplane the more noise it is allowed to make and still be Stage 3
  • Number and type of engines
    • The more engines the airplane has the more noise it can make and still be Stage 3
  • Exempts all business jets GTW <75,000 lbs.
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Stage 3

Stage 2

methods to meet stage 3
Methods to meet Stage 3
  • Replace older aircraft with new Stage 3 certificated airplanes (change fleet mix)
  • Re-certificate existing aircraft with new engines that meet Stage 3 requirements
  • Modify existing engines to meet Stage 3 requirements (Hushkit)
  • Artificially limit GTW to allow it to conform to Stage 3 noise standards
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Airbus 330

Boeing 7E7

Canadair Regional Jet (CRJ)

Airbus 320

And Beyond

what s next stage 4
What’s next – Stage 4
  • Chapter (Stage) 4 noise standard established and adopted by ICAO in 2002. FAA issued a NPRM in March 2004 which parallels ICAO standard
    • Applies to all NEW airplane designs on or after Jan 1, 2006
    • Imposes a requirement that designs must produce noise levels 10 decibels lower than Stage 3
caveat
Caveat
  • Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) noted that U.S. adoption of Stage 4 "is not intended to signal the start of any rulemaking or other proceeding aimed at phasing out the production or operation of current aircraft models.”
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