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Includes Pitt County Memorial Hospital Greenville NC Brody School of Medicine East Carolina University Six community hospitals in eastern NC. Pitt County Memorial Hospital Total beds - 761 with CON approval to add 116 more beds (includes adult floors) Women’s – 38 beds for postpartum

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slide1

Includes

Pitt County Memorial Hospital

Greenville NC

Brody School of Medicine

East Carolina University

Six community

hospitals in eastern NC

slide3

Pitt County Memorial Hospital

Total beds - 761 with CON approval to add 116 more beds(includes adult floors)

Women’s – 38 beds for postpartum

8 beds for antepartum

Labor & Delivery – 23 beds

New Born Nursery – 42 beds

Convalescent newborn unit – 16 beds

Pediatrics – 32 beds

PICU – 12 beds

NICU – 50 beds

slide4

Pitt County Memorial Hospital, is a not-for-profit, tertiary care center

covering the 29 counties of eastern North Carolina and is one of five

academic medical centers in North Carolina. PCMH is the teaching

hospital for Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

Many of our counties are living at or below the poverty level.

The state poverty rate is 12.3 while most of eastern NC is at

15 to 24%.

NC prosperity is threatened by having a region (eastern NC)

that has 10 of the poorest counties of the nation’s

top 20 poorest counties.

NC – 1 in 4 have a college degree

Eastern NC – 1 in 6 has a college degree

Eastern counties are dependent on agriculture and there

are fewer high paying manufacturing job opportunities inthe east.

slide5

Common barriers to health care

  • in eastern NC
  • Economically underserved
  • Medically underserved
  • High health care cost
  • No insurance or under-insured
  • Literacy rate
  • Transportation
  • Measuring the region by years of life lost before
  • age 75, if eastern North Carolina were a state,
  • it would rank 49th.
slide6

Infant Mortality Rate

NC rate – 8.8 per 1,000 live births

Minority infant mortality rate dropped by 4.5%, from a rate

of 15.6 deaths per 1,000 births in 2004 to 14.9 in 2005.

The minority rate is still more than double the Caucasian rate.

Caucasian mortality rate increased from 6.2 in 2004 to 6.4

slide7

Pitt County – 9.4 per 1,000 live births

Bertie County – 17.4 per 1,000 live births

Edgecombe County – 15.3 per 1,000 births

Greene County – 14.9 per 1,000 births

Halifax County – 13.0 per 1,000 births

Lenoir County – 15.5 per 1,000 births

Martin County – 24.6 per 1,000 births

Washington County – 17.5 per 1,000 births

slide8

Prematurity and low birth weight accounted for 20% of deaths of

infants under 1 year old.

28% of the deaths of babies were under 28 days old.

17% of infant deaths were due to birth defects.

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) accounted for nearly 10% of

the deaths.

High quality prenatal care cannot compensate for a lifetime of poor

health, for unhealthy behaviors such as smoking, poor nutrition or

poor physical fitness and limited access to ongoing high

quality health care.

slide9

NC has a high rate of:

Heart disease

Stroke

Diabetes

Obesity

Other chronic health problems

NC per capita spending for public health is among

the lowest in the nation.

slide11
Child Life MissionTo provide developmental and emotional support to children and families facing a healthcare experience.
child life areas serviced
Child LifeAreas Serviced
  • Pediatric Unit
  • Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
  • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit
  • Sedation Services
  • Emergency Department
  • C5 Clinic
  • Radiology
  • Convalescent Newborn Nursery
  • Women’s Services
  • Consults to adult areas
child life staffing
Child LifeStaffing
  • 11 FTE Certified Child Life Specialists
  • 1 PT CCLS
  • 3 PT Child Life Assistants
  • 1 FTE Supervisor
  • Volunteers, students
child life implementing pfcc into practice
Child LifeImplementing PFCC into Practice
  • Family presence during procedures
  • Positioning for Comfort
  • Sibling involvement in hospital experience
  • Patient/Family participation (daily schedules, interventions, pain, etc.)
  • Liaison with communication
  • Child advocate in adult areas
slide15

Family Support Network Eastern NC, Inc.

Providing emotional support and resource

information for families who have a child with a

disability, chronic illness, premature birth and for

families who have experienced the

death of a child.

slide16

Family Support Network Eastern North Carolina

* 1987 – Parent support began in local community 20 hours a week

* 1990 – Parent hired to provide support to other families in Neo-natal Intensive Care Unit (15 hours a week)

* 1991 – Expanded services to include all of Children’s Hospital

(25 hours a week)

* 1992 – Expanded services to include mom’s on bedrest at risk

for premature delivery (Hired 2nd hospital employee)

* 1994 – Bereavement Support

slide17

Family Support Network Eastern North Carolina

* 2007 coverage includes

Children’s (NICU, Peds, PICU, NBN)

Women’s

Trauma (referrals)

Emergency Department (referrals)

Adult floors (consults cardiac, cancer, trauma)

Continuum of Care from Hospital to Home

* 11 employees (parents)

5 - full time

4 - thirty (30) hours a week

2 – less than 20 hours a week

Volunteers and Student Interns

* National Pierson Award Recipient for exemplary services for children with disabilities.

slide18

Pediatric Asthma Program

* 1994 High School senior with a 12 year history of asthma

collapsed after band performance during football

game. Inadequate access to rescue inhaler.

* Pediatric Nurses and parent of student took the message to

officials at the Administrative Office

* Asthma Education and access to medications

mandatory in all Pitt County Schools

* 2006 Recipient of “Emerging Champion of Change in

North Carolina Medicine”

slide19

Bereavement Support

* 1994 – Families shared their stories

* 1995 – Our Children’s Garden

Cherished Lives Memorial Service

* 1996 – Quilt of Memories

* 1997 – Memory boxes

* 2007 – Palliative Care Room

slide21

C5--The Center for Children with

Complex and Chronic Conditions

The mission of C5 is to promote optimal health, growth, development, safety, comfort and overall well-being for children with special health care needs. Respecting the central role of the family in a child’s life, C5 provides resources and supports systems of care that link the child, family, primary care medical home, appropriate medical specialists and the community in which

the family lives.

slide22

C5--The Center for Children with

Complex and Chronic Conditions

  • Started with input from families.
  • Involved in development of pre-visit contact, care plans and satisfaction survey.
  • Patients and families participate in quality improvement.
slide23

C5--The Center for Children with

Complex and Chronic Conditions

  • Pre-visit contact---frames visit to address patient/family concerns, goals (home, school, transition, activities, etc.)
  • Care plan—developed collaboratively
  • Satisfaction survey—open, clear communication, adequate time to discuss concerns and questions, equal partner, etc.
slide26

Family Involvement

* Family Resource Room (co-chair)

* Cherished Lives Service

* Palliative Care Room

* Visitation - 24/7 open unit to parents in NICU, Peds, PICU, Newborn nursery

* Hospital PFCC Steering Committee

* Infection Control

slide27

* Rehab committees

* Children’s hospital design and remodeling

* Presence during resuscitation (Children’s) Adult ICU sporadic

* Free parking for bereaved families

* Cardiac Intensive Care Developing Family Advisory Council

* Hematology/Oncology beginning to incorporate family input into their practice.

slide29

Due to having such a large geographical area and the many variables

  • to participation we have families serving in the following ways:
  • Attending meetings
  • Email participation
  • Phone calls
  • Surveys
  • Reading over materials and submitting their comments
slide30

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Sentinel Event

Mom – hospital employee

Dad – police officer

Child – under 1, history of developmental delays muscle weakness

Admitted to hospital unknown diagnosis

- didn’t want to mask symptoms

- involuntary movements causing loss of lines

- steroids and pain medicines over 2 months

* Infant restraints – new bed and restraints were too short to tie under mattress, so tied to side rails

slide31

* Injury

- wrist broken and not noted until weeks later

* Transparency

- family involved in determining when and

how the wrist was broken

- child had been transferred to another

hospital in another state and back to PCMH during the two months of being hospitalized

- Dad remembered the restraints

Restraint Company called – no one made infantrestraints long enough for the new type bed.

* Results - changes in infant restraints nationally

- infant restraints are being made 6 inches longer

slide32

How do we know if we are making a difference

with staff and families?

How can we measure the results?

Many hours of research and documentation.

slide35

Theme

Current Practice 2005

Current Practice 2006

Desired Practice 2005

Desired Practice 2006

Mission

4.93

5.22

7.02

7.12

Collaboration

4.72

4.96

7.13

7.23

Plan of Care

4.80

5.08

7.04

7.18

Patient/Family Strengths

4.69

4.89

7.06

7.16

Meetings/rounds

3.63

4.06

6.35

6.76

Staff Education

3.94

4.48

6.75

7.06

Staff Survey: Patient- and Family-Centered Care Index

Overall Summary Results from Fall 2005 and Fall 2006

2005(n)=268 / 2006(n)=257

slide36

Theme

Visitation

Current Practice 2005

5.22

Current Practice 2006

5.72

Desired Practice 2005

6.78

Desired Practice 2006

7.08

QI

3.56

4.09

6.59

6.76

 Medical Record Access

3.78

4.22

5.85

6.24

Cultural Competence

4.48

5.01

6.99

7.27

Environmental Design

3.55

3.86

6.87

7.06

  • Current and desired practice levels increased from 2005 to 2006 in all themes.
  • Visitation and mission identified as our strongest current practices.
  • The highest “desire to change practice” themes for 2006 are pt/family involvement in environmental design and rounds/discharge planning.
slide37

Response

2005

2006

No answer

2.24%

3%

No knowledge

13.06%

7%

Some knowledge / not applied to practice

.37%

.5%

Knowledgeable / concepts sometimes applied

55.23%

45%

Knowledgeable / concepts regularly applied

29.10%

44.5%

The table below represents responses to the following question:

How familiar are you with the elements of patient and family-centered care as defined by the Institute of Family-Centered Care?

  • Decrease in “no knowledge.”
  • Significant increase in “concepts regularly applied.”
slide38

Patient/Family Survey: Children’s and Women’s Patient Satisfaction Results

April 18, 2006 thru September 26, 2006 (N=227)

3.00-3.99=Satisfied Most of the time / 4.00 = Satisfied Completely

slide39

This survey tool has been shared with the

Perinatal Quality Collaborative of North Carolina

(PQCNC) and is being considered as a tool

for NICU’s across the state that are involved

in PQCNC.

PQCNC is looking at PFCC for all hospitals in NC

* Discussions are taking place around the following areas:

- Families on rounds

- NICU Advisory Councils

- Visiting hours

- Sibling access to visit

- Kangaroo Care, etc.

slide40

We are still on the journey.

We learn daily from patients and families.

Hospital administration - making changes to ensure

families, patients and visitors leave our hospital satisfied.

slide41

PCMH Admission book now titled “Information for Patients, Families and Visitors”

Opening of PCMH Admission book reads:

“At PCMH, we believe that caring for you means involving your family. Therefore, we encourage family members to take an active role in the care of their loved ones whenever possible.”

slide42

Regional Rehabilitation Center at PCMH

“The process of rehabilitation requires the best efforts of an experienced, integrated patient care team. Patients and their families form the core of our teams.”

PCMH Rapid Response Team—Team H

“Team H is a program that includes family members as part of the care team….. When a nurse or family member is concerned about a serious medical change in the patient such as bleeding, difficulty breathing or when something doesn’t seem right, they can call Team H….We appreciate family participation as we strive to

care for your loved ones.”

slide43

The Ride Home

“As a tertiary care hospital in rural eastern North Carolina, many of our patients and their families have a long ride home at the end of each stay. Imagine what that ride must be like and what the patient and their family are talking about. They are talking about their experience at our hospital. On that ride home, they are talking about you and me. Are we doing everything possible to make sure that as our patients and their families remember their experience at PCMH that their story is positive? We have a great hospital and an opportunity to create a wonderful story of caring, healing, compassion and service for our patients and families.”

Stephen Lawler

President, PCMH

slide45

Contact information:

Brenda Boberg

252-847-5120

bboberg@pcmh.com

Amy Jones

252-847-6836

amjones@pcmh.com