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Installation Management Agency (IMA) IMA101: A brief review May 2006 Philip Sakowitz Deputy Director. TABLE OF CONTENTS. What is the Installation Management Agency (IMA)? Structure Before IMA IMA Today: One Organization Installation Management Relationships IMA’s Key Objectives

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slide1

Installation Management Agency (IMA)

IMA101: A brief review

May 2006

Philip Sakowitz

Deputy Director

table of contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS
  • What is the Installation Management Agency (IMA)?
  • Structure Before IMA
  • IMA Today: One Organization
  • Installation Management Relationships
  • IMA’s Key Objectives
  • The Workforce
  • Six Main Initiatives Fulfilling IMA’s Mission:
    • Lean Six Sigma
    • Installation Design Standards (IDS)
    • Common Levels of Support (CLS)
      • Service Support Programs (SSPs)
    • Standard Garrison Organization (SGO)
    • The Environment
    • Army Transformation
  • Priorities
what is the installation management agency ima
WHAT IS THE INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT AGENCY (IMA)?
  • Activated: Oct. 1, 2002, as single organization to manage and standardize U.S. Army installations
  • Purpose:
    • Provide Soldiers, their families and authorized civilians with quality, consistent services at installations
    • Relieve warfighters of installation-related tasks and enable them to focus on combat training
    • Support mission-readiness and execution
slide4

Main headquarters: Arlington, VA.

  • Regional offices: 7 worldwide
  • Army installations IMA manages: 116

(includes active, reserve and special installations)

  • Workforce (military, civilian): About 75,000
  • Budget: Approximately $8 billion

One

organization

IMA
structure before ima

Department of Army HQ

FORSCOM

TRADOC

USAREUR

USACE

AMC

EUSA

MEDCOM

USAR

16 Installations

1 Installation

30 Installations

48 Installations

2 installations

48 Installations

14 Installations

2 Installations

USMA

ATEC

USARSO

MTMC

SMDC

MDW

USARPAC

2 Installations

1 Installation

1 Installation

6 Installations

2 Installations

3 Installations

8 Installations

STRUCTURE BEFORE IMA
  • Major commands managed all installations prior to IMA
    • Installation services not predictable for Soldiers, families
    • No set standards for installations
    • Installations were “haves” or “have nots”
  • Structure before IMA’s implementation in October 2002:
ima today one organization headquarters arlington va

Region headquarters

EUROPE:Heidelberg

KOREA: Youngsan

IMA TODAY: ONE ORGANIZATIONHEADQUARTERS: ARLINGTON, VA.

NORTHEAST

IMA HQ

Arlington, VA

NORTHWEST

Rock Island Arsenal

Fort Monroe

SOUTHWEST

Fort McPherson

Fort Sam Houston

PACIFIC

SOUTHEAST

Fort Shafter

installation management relationships

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

Major Commands

INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT RELATIONSHIPS

ARMY SECRETARIAT

- Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations and Environment

- Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management and Comptroller

- Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs

INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

CHIEF OF STAFF OF ARMY

G=General Staff

G6

Chief

Information

Officer

G4

Logistics

G8

Plans

Assistant Chief

of Staff for Installation Management

G2

Intel

Manpower and

Reserve Affairs

G3/G5/G7

Operations

G1

Personnel

Programs & Policies

HQ IMA

Korea/Pacific/Europe

N West/S West/ S East/ N East

EXECUTION

MAJOR COMMANDS

G=General Staff

G1

G4

G6

G2

G3/G5/G7

G8

INSTALLATION COMMANDERS

GARRISON

ima s key objectives
IMA’S KEY OBJECTIVES
  • Provide equitable, effective, efficient management of Army installations
    • Support war fighter -- installations as flagships
    • Sustain well-being of Soldiers, family members, authorized civilians
    • Execute “Business Process Redesign” to maximize efficiency, effectiveness of services
    • Enable mission commanders and Soldiers to focus on war front
    • Assist Army transformation and the Army modular force
    • Improve the Army’s aging infrastructure and preserve the environment
    • Communicate IMA goals to key constituencies within internal and external audiences; incorporate feedback from installations into conflict/resolution plans
slide9

THE WORKFORCE

  • About 75,000 workers, 256 geographical locations
  • Military total: 3,124
  • COL Garrison Commanders: 51
  • LTC Garrison Commanders: 28
  • Congressional-appropriatedfund employees: 37,000
  • Occupations: 346+
  • Career programs: 22

(Military figures don’t include data for Special Installations; Reserve Component Installations; and civilian-managed installations.)

  • Nonappropriatedfund employees: 22,000
  • Morale, welfare, recreation occupations: 151
  • Local national workers outside
  • of continental US:
  • 10,000
slide10

Supports IMA’s Strategic Planning

Succession Planning

Learning Management

Individual Development

Army Internships

New Employee

Training

Garrison Training

Civilian Leader

Development

Career Field 29

Functional Training

Mandatory Mobility

Mentorship

Workforce Development/Career Management

Workforce Development

Strategic Communication

WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

Trained, educated and ready workforce

Succession

planning/

future

leadership

Current job

requirements

slide12

Initiative 1:

Business Improvement – Lean Six Sigma

business improvement lean six sigma bi lss
Business Improvement – Lean Six Sigma (BI-LSS)
  • Lean Six Sigma is IMA’s primary method of corporate business
    • Executive training complete
    • Garrison commanders trained
    • Identified business processes for improvement
  • Way ahead
    • Training Greenbelts: Developing pool of Greenbelts at all IMA garrisons.
    • Additional Lean Six Sigma IMA training includes yellow belt, project sponsor and executive training.

Singular Agency Transformation Tool

slide14

Initiative 2:

Installation Design

Standards (IDS)

installation design standards ids
INSTALLATION DESIGN STANDARDS (IDS)
  • Purpose: Define standards for the following:
    • Site planning
    • Buildings, landscaping, utilities
    • Vehicular and pedestrian circulation
    • Force protection
  • Effects:
    • Standardization and reliability
    • Cost-effectiveness and efficiency
    • Sense of community and sustainability
slide16

Initiative 3:

Common Levels

of Support (CLS)

common levels of support cls
COMMON LEVELS OF SUPPORT(CLS)
  • Purpose: Provide installations with standards and measures to ensure consistent, high quality services (49 services total)
  • Benefits
    • Quality: Services performed with same degree of excellence across all installations
    • Consistent: Services consistent yet tailored to unique mission, geography or personal needs
    • Predictable: Regardless of where Soldier, family or authorized civilian is transferred, they can count on quality services
    • Equitable: Balanced funding to Army garrisons
cls strategy
CLS STRATEGY
  • When the Army cannot fund 100% of a service we:
    • Fully fund the highest priority support programs within available funds
    • Inform Customers on the levels of support to be provided
  • Provide definitive performance guidance to Garrisons for the execution of services based on available resources
  • Support distribution of available resources among installations to execute the guidance
  • Measure Garrison performance

WHAT WE DO – WE DO WELL!

service support programs ssps
SERVICE SUPPORT PROGRAMS (SSPs)
  • Purpose: 332 Service Support Programs support installations’ 49 main services
  • Types of Service Support Programs:
    • Must fund SSPs (230 programs)
      • Required by law
      • Provide functions and skill sets for minimum level of service management
      • Yielding service failure if not provided
    • Other SSPs (102 programs)
      • Not required by law, but meet local needs
examples of services
EXAMPLES OF SERVICES
  • What IMA manages:
    • 583,000 family and single housing (examples: owned, leased, privatized)
    • 98,000 trainee barracks spaces (lodging not included)
    • 200,000 computer and phone customers (continental U.S.)
    • 646 recreational facilities, golf courses
    • 152 childcare development centers
    • 108 general libraries
slide21

Initiative 4:

Standard Garrison

Organization (SGO)

standard garrison organization sgo
STANDARD GARRISON ORGANIZATION (SGO)
  • Purpose:
    • Provide garrison structure with consistent functions and processes across all installations
    • Provide common platform to deliver services with common standards
  • Benefits:
    • Soldiers, families depend on similar garrison organizations and services at every base
      • Go to same office, installation to installation, for needed services
    • Army directs resources equitably across garrisons
    • Best business practices uniformly implemented as standard operation procedures
slide23

Initiative 5:

Environmental management

the environment
THE ENVIRONMENT
  • Installations face considerable environmental pressure from internal operational forces, external forces, regulatory requirements, and urbanization around the installations
  • Key topics:
    • Increasing environmental pressures on Army activities
    • Environmental responsibilities
the environment increasing pressures on army activities
THE ENVIRONMENTINCREASING PRESSURES ON ARMY ACTIVITIES

Clean air and water

Noise

Hazardous

waste

Plus operational concerns: Erosion, safety, health, environmentalquality, etc…

Safe drinking water

Munitions regulation

Frequency allocation

Endangered species/

critical habitat

Cultural Resources

Urbanization and other

land use encroachment

Airspace

environmental responsibilities
ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSIBILITIES
  • Most Army environmental issues are on IMA’s 116 installations (out of the Army’s 179 installations)
  • Responsibilities by the numbers:

Total ArmyIMA

Installations and facilities 4,000 116

(includes Nat’l Guard/Reserve Centers)

Historic buildings 12,000 9,000

Endangered species 170 150

Environmental permits 2,500 2,000

Archeological sites 74,641 53,000

Cultural sites 36,000 20,000

Restoration sites 17,000 664

Note: Figures are estimates

slide27

Initiative 6:

Army Transformation

base realignment and closure brac
BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE (BRAC)
  • What is BRAC 2005? A process to decrease excess infrastructure and realign/posture forces onto military installations that can best support the training and operational readiness of the Army
  • IMA’s function
    • Lead and manage the planning and execution of BRAC
    • Assist Major Commands in implementation
    • Develop implementation plans
    • Continue to manage Army Stationing during BRAC
    • Reorganize IMA into 2 Continental U.S. regions (East and West) during BRAC implementation for the Army
    • Realign IMA HQ to Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas
stationing
STATIONING
  • Concurrent with fighting a Global War on Terrorism, the Army is undergoing a significant reorganization
  • Overall impact:
      • Reconfiguring fighting forces into modularized rapid response units
      • Returning forces from Germany and Korea to the U.S.
      • Rebalancing the mix of active and reserve component units
installations critical to success
INSTALLATIONS CRITICAL TO SUCCESS
  • The readiness and quality of life for the Army is dependent on installations where:
    • Soldiers train for war
    • Soldiers and their families establish homes and live
    • Soldiers depart for and return from contingency operations
priorities
PRIORITIES
  • Base Support Funding (Support shortfalls: Efficiencies & Economies of Scale; privatization; divestiture)
  • GWOT support
    • Continued vigilance and investment to project power and support huge mobilization loads with “Flagship” installations
  • Modularity
    • Quickly plan, budget, design, contract and construct/install modular facilities to support immediate transformation of Army warfighting units
  • IGPBS
    • Integrated Global Presence and Basing Strategy – Prepare CONUS installations to receive up to 80k more Soldiers
  • BRAC 2005: Execute BRAC law on time
  • Medical holdovers
    • Potential for much greater demand on installations as more wounded return from Operation Iraq Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)
  • Initial entry training support
    • Preparing training base for 30k end-strength surge
  • Uniform funding and management:
    • Transition MWR workforce to 100% NAF employees beginning 1 Oct 05
slide32

END OF BRIEF

INSTALLATION MANAGEMENT AGENCY

“Sustain, Support and Defend”