Module 4
Download
1 / 31

MODULE 4 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 336 Views
  • Updated On :

MODULE 4. Bobtail Inspections. Introduction.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'MODULE 4' - Olivia


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
Module 4 l.jpg
MODULE 4

Bobtail Inspections


Introduction l.jpg
Introduction

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requires bobtail drivers to inspect their vehicles before operating them each day. Vehicles must undergo monthly, annual, and five-year inspections. In addition to conducting and documenting regular vehicle inspections, is your ability to safely operate your vehicle and pay close attention to your driving duties.

Objectives

After completing this module, you will be able to:

  • Identify daily pre-transfer and walk-around inspection requirements

  • Indicate monthly, annual, and five-year inspection and documentation requirements

  • Describe procedures for handling accidents and emergencies with a propane leak


Lesson 1 l.jpg
LESSON 1

Walk-Around and Pre-Transfer Inspections


Walk around and pre transfer inspections l.jpg
Walk-Around and Pre-Transfer Inspections

Walk-Around Inspection

Performing a walk-around inspection of your bobtail after loading at the bulk plant minimizes the risk for system or documentation issues when arriving at the delivery site.

Pre-Transfer Inspection

49 CFR requires you to visually check the cargo tank emergency discharge system, delivery hose and hose assembly, and emergency discharge control equipment every day before transferring propane.

You may choose to perform your pre-transfer inspection either at the same time as your daily pre-trip inspection or before unloading at your first customer’s location.


Walk around inspection l.jpg
Walk-Around Inspection

After loading, perform a walk-around inspection to verify your bobtail is in safe operating condition. Make sure:

  • The power take-off (PTO) is disengaged.

  • The liquid internal valve and vapor internal valve are closed.

  • All required vehicle and cargo tank tests and inspections are current.

  • Loading paperwork is completed.

  • Tools and other items used during loading are properly stowed and secured.

  • Shipping papers, written emergency discharge control procedures, and your DOT hazmat certificate of registration are in proper order

  • Delivery tickets and any other suppliesare organized and properly secured in the cab.

    If all items are in safe operating condition, remove the chock blocks from the rear wheels, stow them in their transport rack or box, and proceed to your first delivery location.


Walk around inspection cont l.jpg
Walk-Around Inspection cont.

Disengage the PTO.

Close the liquid and vapor internal valves.


Pre transfer inspection l.jpg
Pre-Transfer Inspection

DOT requires you to inspect the following components of your bobtail each day before transferring propane at customer locations.

Inspect the cargo tank discharge system, including:

  • Pump

  • Piping Visible between the pump and other components

  • Liquid internal valve

  • Automatic bypass valve(s)

  • Liquid meter

  • Line valves and hydrostatic relief valves

MORE


Pre transfer inspection cont l.jpg
Pre-Transfer Inspection cont.

Inspect the delivery hose and delivery hose assembly, including:

  • Hose cover

  • Hose couplings

  • Hose reel

    Inspect the emergency discharge control equipment, including:

  • Manually-activated systems

  • Off-truck remotely activated systems

    Note: You must not transfer propane or operate your bobtail until you have completed a daily pre-transfer inspection and made sure any necessary repairs have been made.


Cargo tank discharge system rejection criteria l.jpg
Cargo Tank Discharge System: Rejection Criteria

DOT requires bobtail operators to check the components of the cargo tank discharge system to ensure they are in proper working order and that all connections are secure. You must not begin transfer operations if you find any of the following defects in the cargo tank discharge system.

You must check for:

  • Any external leak identifiable without the use of instruments.

  • Bolts that are loose, missing, or severely corroded.

  • Manual stop valves that will not activate.

  • Flexible connectors with visible cracks or slippage at the couplings, or connectors with expired compliance dates.

  • Hose with exposed reinforcement or permanently deformed wire braid reinforcement.

MORE


Cargo tank discharge system rejection criteria cont l.jpg
Cargo Tank Discharge System: Rejection Criteria cont.

  • Soft spots in hose when not under pressure or bulging in hose when under pressure.

  • Hose with loose outer covering or damaged, slipped, or worn couplings.

  • Liquid internal valves that leak or fail to close.

  • Pipes or joints that are severely corroded.


Delivery hose and assembly rejection criteria l.jpg
Delivery Hose and Assembly: Rejection Criteria

You are required to inspect the delivery hose and its assembly every day as you unwind the hose prior to each transfer. If you find any of the following defects in the delivery hose or assembly, then you must not begin transfer operations. Check for:

  • Hose cover damage that exposes the reinforcement.

  • Permanently kinked or flattened wire braid reinforcement.

  • Bulging under pressure.

  • Loose outer covering.

  • Damaged, slipping, or excessively worn couplings.

  • Loose or missing bolts or fastenings on hose coupling assemblies.

    Always remove from service immediately any hose with signs of unusual abuse, such as stretching, kinking, or flattening by a vehicle.


Emergency discharge control equipment rejection criteria l.jpg
Emergency Discharge Control Equipment: Rejection Criteria

Bobtails can be equipped with two types of emergency shutdown systems.

Manually-activatedsystems

You must not begin product transfer if operating levers, cables, rods, or switches are broken, severely corroded, seized, or otherwise damaged. Be sure to visually inspect fusible elements.

Off-truck remotely activated systems

You must not begin product transfer if:

  • The hand-held transmitter fails to activate the shutdown system.

  • Controls fail to operate without excessive force.

  • Connections are corroded so they seize or bind.

Manually-activatedsystems

MORE


Emergency discharge control equipment rejection criteria cont l.jpg
Emergency Discharge Control Equipment: Rejection Criteria cont.

Off-truck remotely activated systems cont.

  • Controls are not clearly labeled. The controls on remote showdown devices must be clearly labeled so they are useful to emergency responders, company drivers, and unloading operators.

    When testing a wireless transmitter or receiver, have the cargo tank in sight and stand at least 150 ft from it. You must inspect emergency discharge control equipment within 18 hours before the first delivery of the day to ensure they are working properly.

    NOTE: Follow your company’s policies and procedures related to pre-transfer inspection requirements for remotely activated systems.

Remotely-activated system


Lesson 2 l.jpg
LESSON 2 cont.

Monthly, Annual, and Five-Year Inspections


Monthly inspections l.jpg
Monthly Inspections cont.

DOT requires any competent person designated by the vehicle’s owner or operator to perform and document a monthly bobtail inspection.

Monthly vehicle inspections provide an opportunity to:

  • Verify proper operating conditions.

  • Note deficiencies requiring immediate attention.

  • Schedule tests, inspections, or maintenance due the following month.

MORE


Monthly inspections cont l.jpg
Monthly Inspections cont. cont.

The items to check during the monthly bobtail inspection are the same as the daily pre-transfer inspection except for the following important differences:  

  • The inspection of the hose and its assembly is more detailed.

  • The liquid internal valve inspection requires a meter creep test.

  • The monthly inspection must be documented.

    Note: Some propane marketers include additional items in their monthly bobtail inspection programs, so be sure to check with your supervisor.


Inspecting the delivery hose and assembly l.jpg
Inspecting the Delivery Hose and Assembly cont.

Inspecting the delivery hose and its assembly requires examining the full length of the hose and its connections and fittings. The hose must be pulled away from the hose reel and examined to determine if any of the hose rejection criteria are present. A unique delivery hose assembly identification number should be verified during the inspection.

Follow the steps below when completing the monthly examination of the delivery hose and its assembly:

  • Lay the hose out as straight as possible to avoid kinking.

  • Check for cuts, abrasions, soft spots, blisters, loose outer covers, and bulges. Small cuts and nicks in the outer cover rarely require hose replacement unless the rubber is loose or the reinforcement is exposed.

  • Examine the fitting, plus 18″ back from the fitting, by pressing the hose with your thumb to detect any soft spots or bulges. If they exist, notify your supervisor.

  • Inspect each coupling for slippage. Suspect slippage if the coupling is misaligned on the hose or if the hose is scored or exposed. Examine any coupling bolts and remove the hose from service if any bolts are loose, missing, or severely corroded. See your company specific guidelines.

MORE







Documenting the monthly inspection l.jpg
Documenting the Monthly Inspection cont.

The inspector is required to document the results of the monthly inspection and provide a copy of the inspection form for the company’s vehicle maintenance files.

Address any defects noted according to your company policy.

MORE


Documenting the monthly inspection cont l.jpg
Documenting the Monthly Inspection cont. cont.

Annual and Five-Year Cargo Tank Inspections

  • Annual Inspection: DOT requires an annual external visual inspection (V) and leakage test (K) of all cargo tanks to check for damage such as leaks, corrosion, pitting, or piping defects. A DOT-registered inspector must perform this inspection.

  • Five-Year Inspection: DOT also requires cargo tanks to be hydrostatically pressure tested every five years (P). Additionally, an internal inspection (I) is required If the cargo tank has a manway. Only a DOT-registered inspector can complete the internal inspection. Some companies may replace the relief valves and flex connectors during the five-year inspection.

    The cargo tank must be appropriately marked with the annual and five-year pressure test dates.


Lesson 3 l.jpg
LESSON 3 cont.

Safe Driving and Handling Emergencies


Introduction26 l.jpg
Introduction cont.

In addition to conducting regular vehicle inspections and proper maintenance, your commitment to operate your vehicle safely and pay attention to your driving duties is critical. In the last course, you learned how to handle and report accidents and emergencies with no propane leak. Now, we’ll present how you should handle accidents and emergencies with your bobtail when there is product release.

Accidents and fires involving propane do occur. This lesson provides several reminders to ensure safe working conditions when you deliver propane and prepares you to work with emergency response personnel to appropriately address dangerous and unexpected situations.

Note: Each emergency situation is site specific and will vary based on the type of scenario you may encounter. So while it is important to always follow your company’s policies, there are basic guidelines to help you.


Safe driving practices l.jpg
Safe Driving Practices cont.

Safe driving practices benefit drivers and the public. They are essential for anyone who operates a CMV, and are particularly critical for propane drivers who transport hazardous cargo. It’s crucial for bobtail drivers to be alert, maintain vehicle control, and stay focused during daily deliveries.

Consider the following:

  • There is a tendency for anyone who repeats the same duties often to fall into patterns. This also applies to you. Do not forget the larger implications of forgetting the smaller details.

  • Stay alert and avoid distractions and anything that can take your eyes off the road, including eating, talking on a phone, and checking tickets and maps while en route.

MORE


Safe driving practices cont l.jpg
Safe Driving Practices cont. cont.

Consider the following (cont):

  • Vehiclesoperate differently. Your personal vehicle is not the same as the vehicle that you drive on the job. Know the safe operating procedures for the vehicle you drive.

    Note: When released to the air, one cubic foot of propane liquid will expand to approximately 270 cubic ft of vapor. Staying alert and driving safely are ways to keep you from causing a potentially deadly propane leak.


Handling emergencies with a propane leak l.jpg
Handling Emergencies with a Propane Leak cont.

An emergency exists any time an unintended or uncontrolled release of LP-gas or any other hazardous material occurs during transportation or loading and unloading operations. Follow these guidelines when an accident causes a propane leak, while en route in your bobtail:

  • Stop, park your vehicle, and shut off your engine a safe distance from the road, other vehicles, and potential ignition sources.

  • Immediately exit the vehicle, take your documents with you, and get your fire extinguisher.

  • Move up-wind of a leak or vapor cloud, and only activate emergency shutdown devices away from the leak if it is safe to do so.

  • Call 911 to notify the emergency response personnel. Call your supervisor and report the incident.

  • Remain at the scene, cooperate with emergency response personnel, and provide required documents.

  • Never enter or pass through a vapor cloud produced by an uncontrolled release of propane.


Handling vehicle rollovers l.jpg
Handling Vehicle Rollovers cont.

Propane bobtails are top heavy and the effects of side-to-side surge can contribute to rollovers. Pay very careful attention to the road and make every attempt to avoid any type of accident. Ask your company supervisor about the best way to avoid a rollover based on the terrain in your driving area.

If you are involved in a rollover, follow these guidelines:

  • If you are able and it is safe to do so, exit the vehicle.

  • Once outside, eliminate any potential ignition sources, if it is safe to do so. Call 911 to notify the emergency response personnel. Then, call your supervisor and report the incident.

  • You may not know the condition of the vehicle after the accident and will need to rely on the emergency response personnel to assess and handle the situation.


Summary l.jpg
Summary cont.

Some important points to remember from this module are:

  • DOT requires bobtail drivers to inspect their vehicles before operating them each day. Vehicles must also undergo more thorough monthly, annual, and five-year inspections.

  • Inspecting the cargo tank discharge system and the delivery hose assembly is essential to the safe and efficient operation of the bobtail.

  • You must inspect emergency discharge control systems within 18 hours before the first delivery of the day to ensure they are in good working order.

  • A DOT-registered inspector must perform an annual external visual inspection and leakage test of all cargo tanks to check for damage such as leaks, corrosion, pitting, or piping defects.

  • DOT requires cargo tanks to be hydrostatically pressure tested every five years and internally inspected if they have a manway.

  • Each emergency situation is site specific and will vary based on the type of scenario you may encounter. It is important to always follow your company policy and basic guidelines for any situation.


ad