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Module 6 Appleton Area School District Personal Protective Equipment Employee Safety Training Module April 2009 PPE Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is any item of clothing that you wear to protect yourself from hazards at the work place. Examples of job hazards include:

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slide1

Module 6

Appleton Area School District

Personal Protective

Equipment

Employee

Safety Training Module

April 2009

slide2

PPE

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is any item of clothing that you wear to protect yourself from hazards at the work place. Examples of job hazards include:

  • Level A - Totally encapsulated “moon suit”, SCBA respirator.
  • Level B - Splash suit, SCBA or supplied air respirator.
  • Level C - Tyvek suit, filtering face-piece respirator.
  • Level D - General Safety Equipment.
  • Noise
  • Chemicals
  • Accidental Impact
  • Sharp objects
  • Flying Particles
  • Dust & Mists
  • Bright Light
  • Vibration

There are 4 Classifications of PPE.

slide3

Level A

Level A- Totally encapsulated “moon suit”, Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA)

  • Used for the most toxic environments or where the contaminants (and thus the hazards) are unknown.
  • The person and their air supply are encapsulated within a suit.
  • Positive pressure air supply keeps contaminants from leaking in.
  • These suits are not used by AASD employees.
  • If you see these suits in use by others, leave the area.
slide4

Level B

Level B- Splash suit, supplied air

  • For total skin and clothing coverage.
  • Boots and gloves are attached or taped to the suit.
  • Worn with an external air supply tank (SCBA) which provides clean air through a regulator.
  • These suits are not used by AASD employees.
  • If you see these suits in use by others, leave the area.
slide5

Level C

Level C- Protective clothing, respirator

  • Tyvek type suit for protection of skin and clothes.
  • Worn with a respirator.
  • Boots and gloves are attached or taped to the suit.
  • Can only be worn when you know the chemical contaminants present and have cartridge respirator filters for those contaminants.
  • Can only be worn with sufficient ambient oxygen (19.5% or greater).
slide6

Level D

Level D- Protective clothing

  • No respiratory protection is worn with Level D except voluntary dust masks.
  • May also include:
    • Hard hats
    • Safety glasses
    • Hearing protection
    • Gloves
    • Boots
    • High visibility clothing, etc.
slide7

AASD Levels

Levels Used At AASD

  • AASD Employees will mainly wear Level D Type PPE.
  • Level C may be required for certain boiler cleaning operations or work activities requiring the use of tyvek suits and half-faced respirators.
  • Activities requiring Level A or B PPE will not be performed by AASD employees.
slide8

Basics

You should know the following about the PPE that you are required to wear:

  • Limitations of PPE
  • How to use PPE
  • When to use PPE
  • Inspect before use
  • Replacement
  • Cleaning & Storage
slide9

PPE Limitations

PPE does not work by itself.

  • PPE acts as a barrier between you and a hazard
  • PPE will not protect you if it is:
  • Not designed for the specific hazard.
  • Damaged or worn.
  • Not adjusted properly.
  • If you do not perform the work correctly.
slide10

Using PPE

For PPE to be effective in protecting you:

  • Use it in the manner you have been trained.
  • Use it only for the specific hazards for its design.

Before you use your PPE, inspect it for:

  • Worn or damaged parts.
  • Leaks, cracks or deformities.
  • Cleanliness.
  • Correct size.
slide11

Damaged PPE

If any PPE is damaged or worn:

  • Get it repaired or replaced immediately.
  • Do not work without replacement PPE.
  • TELL your supervisor you need new PPE.

Clean your PPE regularly. Do not store it where it will be in contact with any of the following:

  • Dust & Dirt
  • Chemicals
  • Sunlight
  • Water
slide12

AASD Policy

General AASD Requirements

1) PPE is required to be worn at all times by all district employees when performing specific tasks requiring the donning of PPE. Under no circumstances shall employees put on their safety equipment after they have begun performing their specific task.

2) Employees shall inspect their PPE for deficiencies such as cracks, deterioration, and/or other abnormalities or conditions of wear before putting it on. Defective equipment shall not be worn and must be replaced immediately. To replace defective PPE, contact your supervisor.

3) Employees shall contact their supervisor prior to the performance of any non-routine tasks to determine the appropriate PPE needed to safely perform the task.

slide13

AASD Policy

General AASD Requirements

4) Prescription safety glasses will be made available to any employee who is required to wear eye protection as a part of their job. Contact your supervisor to obtain information on getting a prescription.

5) Supervisors shall ensure that all district employees comply with the requirements of the District’s PPE policy at all times.

6) It is the responsibility of the employee hosting a visitor to ensure that their guests wear the proper PPE, if deemed necessary.

7) Employees who contract with outside vendors shall ensure that the contractor and his or her sub-contractors wear the appropriate PPE, as deemed necessary.

slide14

Feet

AASD Policy requires the following PPE to be worn whenever the corresponding hazards exist for the work being performed:

  • Chemical Resistant Boots/Boots Covers: Penetration or splashing of chemicals.
  • Insulated Boots: Extreme cold temperatures.
  • Puncture Resistant Soles: Penetration of sharp objects.
  • Slip Resistant Soles: Slippery or wet surfaces.
  • Steel Toe Safety Shoes: Impact from heavy objects or compression.
slide15

Head

AASD Policy requires the following PPE to be worn whenever the corresponding hazards exist for the work being performed:

  • Hard Hat: Head injuries caused by falling objects or impact with stationary objects.
slide16

Eyes

AASD Policy requires the following PPE to be worn whenever the corresponding hazards exist for the work being performed:

  • Safety Glasses: General dusty or dirty conditions.
  • Impact Goggles: Impact from flying objects.
  • Chemical Splash Goggles: Chemical splashes and acid/caustic burns.
  • Shaded Safety Glasses: Glare/high intensity lights.
  • Welding Goggles/Shield: Ultra-violet light.
slide17

Body

AASD Policy requires the following PPE to be worn whenever the corresponding hazards exist for the work being performed:

  • Impervious Apron: Chemical exposure.
  • PVC Nylon Jacket and Overalls: Chemical exposure.
  • Silver Shield Sleeves: Burning and welding activities.
  • Insulated Jacket with Hood: Extreme cold.
  • Static Control Coats/Coveralls: Electrical coat/coveralls.
  • Cut Resistant Sleeves/Wristlets: Sharp objects.
slide18

Hands

AASD Policy requires the following PPE to be worn whenever the corresponding hazards exist for the work being performed:

  • Disposal Latex Gloves: Blood and other infectious bodily material.
  • Chemical Resistant Gloves: Chemical splashes and acid/caustic burns.
  • Cotton or Anti-Vibration Gloves: Vibrations.
  • General Purpose Work Gloves: Rough objects.
  • Heat/Flame Resistant Gloves: Extreme heat.
  • Insulated Gloves: Extreme cold temperatures.
  • Insulated Rubber Gloves: Electrical shock.
  • Leather/Cut Resistant Gloves: Sharp objects, abrasion and penetration.
slide19

Eye and Face Protection

There are several levels of eye and face protection available:

  • Safety glasses
  • Goggles
  • Face shields
slide20

Safety Glasses

Safety glasses protect against the impact of flying objects, fragments, debris, large chips or particles of wood, dirt or dust.

  • Safety glasses must be worn with side-shields.
  • Detachable side-shields must be installed at all times.
  • Keep clean for good visibility.
  • Safety glasses may be purchased with prescription lenses.
slide21

Splash Goggles

Splash goggles protect against eye injuries caused by liquid chemical splashes or exposure to mists, vapors or hot sparks. They also provide impact protection.

  • Goggles should be kept clean for best visibility.
  • Extreme temperatures and humidity may cause fogging.
  • Anti-fog cleaning products and ventilated, ribbed goggles may be used to reduce fog build-up.
  • Splash goggles may be worn over prescription eye glasses, or can be made to include prescription lenses.
slide22

Face Shields

Face shields protect the whole face from flying objects, sparks, fragments, debris, large chips or particles of wood, dirt, dust or debris.

  • Face shields must always be worn over safety glasses or safety goggles to protect the eyes.
  • Tinted shields protect eyes from radiant heat given off from molten metal.
slide23

Welding Helmets

Welding helmets and goggles protects the eyes from exposure to the optical radiation which is emitted from welding, cutting and brazing. The helmets provide additional facial protection from flying sparks.

  • Should be worn over the top of safety glasses according to NIOSH.
  • All welding helmets provide 100% protection from ultraviolet and infrared radiation regardless of shade. The shade number simply denotes the amount of darkness provided by a particular lens.
  • Arc welding typically requires shade numbers 10 – 14. Welding goggles can be used for gas welding or cutting with shade numbers of 4-8. See next slide.
  • Welding goggles should be worn with a face shield to protect the face from sparks, flying debris and infrared radiation.
slide25

Hard Hats

Hard hats are designed to protect the head and skull from puncture, crush and contusion type injuries. Specially rated hard hats are available to protect from electrical hazards.

  • Ensure that the saddles are firmly seated in place.
  • Never wear your hat backwards.
  • Do not place stickers on a hard hat. Stickers conceal cracks.
  • Inspect periodically for damage and replace if damage is noted.
slide26

Combinations of PPE

You may combine PPE to provide all of the protection you need to get the job done safely.

  • Face shields can be attached to hard hats and worn over both safety glasses and a dust mask.
  • Here you see safety glasses worn with a face shield, hard hat and hearing protection. The face shield is hinged and can be swung up out of the way when not in use.
slide27

Gloves

There are numerous types of gloves to

provide hand protection for every job:

  • Cotton
  • Leather
  • Cut resistant
  • Heat resistant
  • Disposable latex or nitrile
  • Chemical resistant

Gloves are available in all sizes and lengths:

slide28

Cotton Gloves

Cotton gloves provide the most basic protection.

They are used for general purpose work.

  • Provide protection against minor cuts and abrasions.
  • Provide minimal warmth.
  • May be worn under other gloves for comfort.
  • Not protective against water, acids, aqueous solutions, heat, cuts, biological hazards, welding or electrical hazards.
slide29

Leather Gloves

Leather gloves provide more protection than cotton gloves. You may use full leather, or just leather palms.

  • Provide protection against minor abrasions, cuts and blisters.
  • Provide minimal warmth.
  • Not protective against water, acids, aqueous solutions, extreme heat and cold, very sharp objects, biological hazards, welding or electrical hazards.
slide30

Cut Resistant Gloves

Cut resistant gloves provide protection against glass, sharp metal edges, knives and razors. They are not cut proof, but they are cut resistant.

  • Provide protection from glass, metal, and idle saw blades lacerations.
  • Provides full palm and knuckle coverage.
  • May be water proof.
  • May be worn over other gloves for comfort or additional warmth.
  • Not protective against extreme heat or cold, welding, electrical hazards, or cuts from moving saw blades.
slide31

Heat Resistant Gloves

Heat resistant gloves provide protection against high temperatures and burns.

  • Provide protection against high temperatures, heat and burns.
  • Useful when working near furnaces, kilns, autoclaves, etc.
  • May also be effective with extreme cold- liquid nitrogen, cryogenic materials, and handling frozen goods.
  • Not protective against water, acids, aqueous solutions, biological hazards, welding or electrical hazards.
slide32

Disposable Gloves

Latex, nitrile, neoprene, and rubber gloves protect against liquids, aqueous solutions and bio-hazards.

  • Thin disposable gloves.
  • Ambidextrous (all gloves fit right or left hand).
  • Water proof.
  • Single use as they are thin and tear easily.
  • Available powdered (easy on/off) or without (protect against contamination).
  • Remove by turning the glove inside out as you peel it off from wrist to finger tip. (Contaminants will remain inside.)
  • Not protective against cuts, tears, acids, heat, welding or electrical hazards.
slide33

Chemical Resistant

Chemically resistant gloves are made of a variety of materials to handle chemical solvents (e.g. acetone). Be sure to wear gloves specific to the material that you will be handling.

  • Provide protection against acids, hydrocarbons and other chemicals.
  • Continuous membrane does not allow water or other aqueous solutions to soak into the glove.
  • Thicker and tougher than disposable gloves. Must be cleaned or decontaminated after use and before storage.
  • Not protective against heat, cuts, welding or electrical hazards.
slide34

Chemical Resistant

Use the following chart to select the appropriate type of glove you should wear.

slide35

Aprons

Aprons are designed to keep liquids from dripping onto your clothing or skin. Like safety gloves, they can be made of many materials to protect you from specific chemicals or sparks.

  • Most effective with dry dusts and fibers, or as minor splash protection.
  • Not effective with highly hazardous liquid chemicals such as acids or peroxides.
  • May be used with protective sleeves.
  • Aprons are not impervious to liquids!
slide36

Tyvek Suits

Tyvek suits protect clothing and skin from toxic chemicals such as asbestos, PCBs, lead, and cadmium, as well as dirt, oils and greases.

  • Most effective with dry dusts and fibers, or as minor splash protection.
  • Not effective with highly hazardous liquid chemicals such as acids or peroxides.
  • These suits are not impervious to liquids!
  • Designed to be disposed of after each use.
slide37

Work Boots

Work boots are designed to provide a variety of types of protection for your feet. secure footing, ankle support, and limited protection from chemicals and crushing weights.

  • Thick soles provide traction to prevent slips and protect against minor puncture wounds.
  • Ankle high boots provide ankle support and protect against sprains.
  • Steel toed boots prevent some protection from crushing injuries.
  • Thick, sturdy leather provides minimal protection from oils and contaminants.
  • If your boots are worn in contaminated areas, change them before going home.
slide38

Chemical Resistant Boots

These boots provide traction and chemical resistance.

  • Good for use when handling large amounts of chemical substances.
  • Impervious to water, mild acids, alkalis, and hydrocarbons.
  • Available with or without steel toe.
  • Kick off lugs make it easy to remove boots without handling and spreading contaminants.
  • Leave boots at work to prevent chemicals from leaving the work area and possibly contaminating your car, home, etc.
slide39

Metatarsal Protection

Metatarsal protection can be added over steel toed shoes to extend protection to the upper foot, or it can be built right into a safety shoe at the time of manufacture.

  • Add-ons can be slipped over steel toe shoes if desired.
  • An example of when such protection may be required includes loading and/or unloading drums or working closely with heavy equipment or loads.
slide40

PPE

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) is provided by AASD to protect you against known hazards in the work place:

  • You can improve safety in the work place by wearing the safety gear that is provided.
  • It is helpful to report new safety hazards you observe to your supervisor or a safety manager.
  • The best way to protect yourself at work is to be aware of hazards and to follow safety procedures.
  • If you see a co-worker using unsafe work practices, mention it to them or to your supervisor.

Together, we can keep AASD Facilities safe place to work!

slide41

Things To Remember

Remember to do the following:

  • Use the right PPE for the Hazard.
  • Inspect your PPE before using.
  • Replace damaged or worn PPE.
  • Store your PPE properly so it will be ready for the next use.
  • Keep your PPE clean.
  • Notify your supervisor if you need new PPE.
slide42

End Training Program

Outside Contractors

If you have questions about the AASD Personal Protective Equipment Program or Policies, please talk to your supervisor. You may also contact

Robert Zuehlsdorf