Collaborative Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence Based Practice in Social Work Agencies. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Collaborative Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence Based Practice in Social Work Agencies.
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Collaborative Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence Based Practice in Social Work Agencies.

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  1. Collaborative Dissemination and Implementation of Evidence Based Practice in Social Work Agencies. Sarah E. Bledsoe Jennifer Bellamy Lin Fang Catherine Coppolino Jennifer Crumpley Julia Jean-Francios Edward J. Mullen Columbia University, School of Social Work, Musher Center Supported in part by National Institute of Health Doctoral Training Program in Mental Health Services Research #5 T32 MH14623-24/25 & the Willma & Albert Musher Center at Columbia University

  2. Background • Comprehensive and unified approach to EBP: • Share resources between agencies and practitioners • Increase buy-in and ownership at all levels • Increase quality continuing education • Make research more user-friendly • Provide tools • Attach meaningful signposts • Protect time (Bellamy, Traube & Bledsoe,2004)

  3. Literature Review Barriers: • Lack of Knowledge & Skills for EBP • Lack of Fit to Agency Practice • Suspicion of Researchers & EBP • Limited Resources for EBP (Bellamy, Traube & Bledsoe,2004)

  4. Current Strategies for EBP Implementation • Bottom-up: Teaching professionals to be evidence-based, lifetime learners (Sackett, 2000; Gibbs & Gambrill, 2002; Gibbs, 2003; Gray, 2001) • Top-down: Tool kits/application kits/manuals/guidelines (Mueser, Torrey, Lynde, Singer and Drake, 2003) • Top-down/bottom-up: Combining evidence & consensus (Cook, 2004) • Combine focus on practitioner training & organizational development: A. Interactive staff training (McCracken & Corrigan, 2004) B. Outcomes & objectives orientation (Rosen, Proctor, Morrow-Howell, Auslander, & Staudt, 1993) • Targeting the Social Work Profession • Objectives-Focused Multilevel Strategy (Proctor, 2004)

  5. Pilot Study • Pilot study aim: • Design-pilot-refine strategy for implementing EBP in social work agencies • Multi-site to permit comparison

  6. How can social work organizations & practitioners be engaged & helped to adopt & implement evidence-based practice? Main Research Question:

  7. Social Intervention Research Design • Phase one Review literature, interview experienced EBP researchers • Phase two Select partner agencies, design study • Phase three Implement and modify intervention, evaluate outcomes

  8. Findings from Initial Meetings • Agency-university RELATIONSHIP is key • Evidence based practice is an relatively unfamiliar term • Preference for a team approach • Resources may be limited (e.g. computers, time and scheduling)

  9. More Findings • Agencies want trainings in EBP, but not to be told how to practice • Staff have varying levels of expertise and education • It’s a struggle to find the “perfect” question

  10. Process of Initial Meetings • Understanding problem formulation -large agencies with diverse programs -continual narrowing of focus -process vs. outcome interest • Team building -creative, innovative, or change oriented staff -midlevel administrator interest

  11. Team Formation

  12. Overview of the Model Curriculum • Based largely on Gibbs’ book: Evidence Based Practice for the Helping Professions • Multi-session, multi-module flexible design • Reflects Gibbs’ seven stages of evidence based practice

  13. First Step: Motivation Rapport building at Pre-implementation • Initial meetings Knowledge gathering (Baseline data) • Module 1: Focus group and questionnaires • Module 2: Overview of EBP including history and motivation for use

  14. Second Step: Question Formulation Module 3: • Components of a researchable question (COPES) • Question types • Brainstorming question • Selection of team question

  15. Third Step: Tracking Down Evidence Module 4: • Types of research evidence Module 5: • Search tools (search terms and electronic resources) • Team searching plan • Hands-on computer lab searching

  16. Step Four: Appraising the Evidence Module 7: • Trouble-shooting the search (homework) Module 8: • Review of research evidence • General discussion of quality and quick tips • Formal assessment instruments

  17. Step Five: Applying the Results Module 9: Group discussion format Module 10: Synthesis of findings (along with practitioner knowledge)

  18. Step 6: Evaluation Evaluation of the experience by the team- debriefing Formal Evaluation • Focus groups • Questionnaires • Feedback on Instruments

  19. Step 7: Teaching Module 11: Agency action plan • Training to others • Reporting findings/experience to wider agency • Adding resources • Duplication and continuation of model

  20. Preliminary Findings (Barriers) 1. Validated barriers: • Lack of Knowledge & Skills for EBP • Lack of Fit to Agency Practice • Suspicion of Researchers & EBP • Limited Resource for Doing EBP (Bellamy, Traube & Bledsoe,2004) 2. New Barriers: Agency culture, Larger community environment

  21. Preliminary Findings (Knowledge) Knowledge 1. Some exposure to EBP 2. Varied and partial definitions of EBP 3. Little Pressure to Use EBP

  22. Preliminary Findings (Promoters) 1. Administrative leadership (time, culture, etc.) 2. Partnership with researchers 3. Incentives to use EBP 4. Acknowledge the humanity and art of practice 5. Value agency philosophy 6. Research evidence that’s useful

  23. Preliminary Findings (Curriculum) • Practitioners are motivated to use EBP • Practical tools and hands-on training experiences are most helpful • There is not enough time to learn all that is necessary to use EBP • Two agencies plan to incorporate components of the training into existing agency processes

  24. For More Information Betsy Bledsoe seb2108@columbia.edu Jennifer Bellamy jlb2109@columbia.edu