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Generative Criticism

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    1. Generative Criticism Aby Dietrich Kelly Hunyet Caity McBride

    3. Generative Criticism Process Encounter a Curious Artifact Coding the Artifact in General Searching for an Explanation Creating an Explanatory Schema Formulating a Research Question Coding the Artifact in Detail Searching the Literature Framing the Study Writing the Essay

    4. Encountering a Curious Artifact -Can be either Discursive or Nondiscursive If we dont feel intensely about it one way or another-it can be hate, love, disgust, surprise, fear, awe, perplexity-we dont write. -Frentz & Rushing

    5. Coding the Artifact in General - Initial Broad-Brush coding - Include major dimensions of the artifact - Think about what you remember after only encounter the artifact once - Look for: Topics and how they are treated Order Lengths of segments Significant words and images

    6. Coding the Artifact in General Interpretation of the Codes -Feature to Interpretation *General Indicators Feature: Menacing-looking clock Interpretation- Time as a monster

    7. Coding the Artifact in General Grouping the Codes - Tear apart your separate codes - Group them into related piles - Name your piles using words or phrase that captures what you are seeing in each group. Answers why you grouped them together. These groups will start to emerge themes that will begin to characterize the artifact.

    8. Searching for an Explanation - Apply pre-existing theories to your artifact in search of an explanation. - Also research journals and books - Avoid Cookie Cutter Criticism

    9. Creating an Explanatory Schema An explanatory schema is an explanation that comes from your thinking about the data of the artifact. Helps you to discover a better explanation for your artifact than what was offered. Explains how your constructs and concepts relate to each other.

    10. Parts of the Explanatory Schema Cutting and sorting codes Engaging in a conceptualizing conversation Brainstorming

    11. Cutting and Sorting Codes 1) Write the codes in a list 2) Cut the list individually with scizzors 3) Sort into piles according to topic How can the labels be connected to the codes? Ex: is there something these all have in common?Ex: is there something these all have in common?

    12. Engaging in a conceptualizing conversation Have a conversation with someone else (or even a small group) about your artifact. Discuss: the initial coding that you did, explain what you see in the artifact, clarify terms, what in the artifact do you find interesting? What was unexplained by previous theories?Discuss: the initial coding that you did, explain what you see in the artifact, clarify terms, what in the artifact do you find interesting? What was unexplained by previous theories?

    13. Brainstorming This uses formal techniques designed to facilitate original thinking. Five subgroups to this: 1) Introducing random stimulation 2) Shifting focus 3) Applying the topics 4) Reversing 5) Questioning Introduce random stimulation (irrelevant to your topic)- look around the room and select an object; Shifting focus (try paying attention to something else in the artifact that you normally wouldnt )- three perspectives; Applying the topics (Aristotles topic- generate ideas for a conceptual scheme); reversing (go away from what you know and pursue an opposite direction); Questioning (challenge assumptions you have about the artifact and persue various aspects of it in depth. Introduce random stimulation (irrelevant to your topic)- look around the room and select an object; Shifting focus (try paying attention to something else in the artifact that you normally wouldnt )- three perspectives; Applying the topics (Aristotles topic- generate ideas for a conceptual scheme); reversing (go away from what you know and pursue an opposite direction); Questioning (challenge assumptions you have about the artifact and persue various aspects of it in depth.

    14. Formulating a Research Question State clearly what your question is. Create a question for whichever explanatory schema you have developed is the answer.

    15. Coding the Artifact in Detail Code the artifact again using the component elements of your explanatory schema. Look for qualities that will help answer your research question by: 1) Cutting up notes/ codes 2) Sort coded data into piles according to topics 3) Label piles with a common word for each 4) Create actual labels youll use to name the various components of your schema Ex: Run Lola Run- victim, supplicant, creator Testing your proposed schema against the data of your artifact and developing your schema further. Testing your proposed schema against the data of your artifact and developing your schema further.

    16. Two Piles Leaves you with two piles of your literature notes for each explanatory schemas major events: 1) Piles of concepts from coding 2) Piles of notes from the literature review

    17. Searching for Literature Do a mini lit review for the key concepts of the schema 2 probs when you survey for literature: Seems overwhelming Keeping track of everything you read to use it effectively.

    18. Framing the study many options and routes for framing your study use your frame to help highlight which ever part of your analysis you would like to concentrate on

    19. Framing the study For example: If your research question asks why political leaders justify unpopular wars You could frame your study as 1) a contribution to an understanding of political discourse 2) an understanding of war rhetoric OR 3) an understanding of justificatory rhetoric so ultimately, the framing of your study is used to help direct your audience into seeing the big picture behind your rhetorical analysis

    20. Writing the Essay For Generative Criticism we use the same essay writing steps used in our previous chapters 1) An introduction, discussing the research question and its contribution and significance to rhetorical theory 2) Description of the artifact and its context 3) A brief description of the generative process used 4) Report of the findings of the analysis 5) A discussion of the contribution the analysis makes to rhetorical theory

    21. Example Haunting Argentina: Synecdoche in the Protests of the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo

    22. Rhetorical consequences State of limbo--- created by all of the synecdoches (symbols, sayings, slogans, actions) during their state of protest .... How the mothers, and the country as a whole, deal with the issues and information about the disappeared. All in their own ways, as demonstrated by the original group of mothers, as well as the following subgroups.

    23. Conclusion Generative Criticism is A broader theory often used as a hybrid when just one simpler theory will not work. Ultimately it is up to the author (YOU) to generate units" in which you will analyze your artifact. used by seasoned critics Appropriate when your issue is bigger than one theory(such as metaphoric) and you want to prove more than one point in your essay