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A Prayer for all my countrymen . GUY BUTLER. A Prayer for all my countrymen Though now few eyes Can see beyond Our tragic times complexities Dear God ordain Such deeds be done Such words be said . That men will praise Your image yet When all these terrors And hates are dead .

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a prayer for all my countrymen

A Prayer for all my countrymen

GUY BUTLER

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

slide2

A Prayer for all my countrymen

Though now few eyes Can see beyond Our tragic times complexities Dear God ordain Such deeds be done Such words be said

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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That men will praise Your image yet When all these terrors And hates are dead

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

slide4

Through rotting days Beaten, broken, Some stayed pure; Others learnt how To grin and endure And here and there A heart stayed warm A head grew clear.

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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Guy Butler (full name Frederick Guy Butler, b. 21 January 1918 in Cradock, Eastern Cape South Africa - 26 April 2001, Grahamstown, South Africa) was a South African poet and writer.

He was born and educated in the Eastern Cape town of Cradock. He attended Rhodes University and received his MA in 1938. After marrying Jean Satchwell in 1940 he left South Africa to fight in the Second World War. After the war, he read English Literature at Brasenose College, Oxford University, graduating in 1947. He returned to South Africa, lecturing in English at the University of the Witwatersrand. In 1951, he returned to Rhodes University in Grahamstown to take up a post as Senior Lecturer, and a year later was made Professor and Head of English. He remained there until his retirement in 1987, when he was appointed Emeritus Professor and Honourary Research Fellow. He received honorary doctorates from the University of Natal, the University

of the Witwatersrand and Rhodes University.

Butler promoted the culture of English-speaking South Africans,

which led to the charge of separatism from some critics,

although he argued for integration rather than exclusivity.

He was influential in achieving the recognition of South African

English Literature as an accepted discipline. In his poetry he

strove for the synthesis of European and African elements into

a single voice

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

a prayer for all my countrymen the title
A Prayer for all my countrymenThe title
  • A prayer to God at a time when there was political intolerance and injustice.
  • The prayer is meant for all his countrymen – people of all race, colour and creed.
  • My countrymen- implies that they are more than just people living in the same country – this suggests a sense of belonging – they all belong here.
  • The fact that the poet expresses his thoughts in the form of a prayer tells us that he is asserting his own faith, his belief and his trust in God.

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

a prayer for all my countrymen the theme
A Prayer for all my countrymenThe theme

Praying to God, on behalf of all South Africans, to remove all ideological tension and all injustice in South Africa by creating a better understanding between all people.

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

a prayer for all my countrymen compare this poem to our national anthem
A Prayer for all my countrymenCompare this poem to our National Anthem
  • Lord, bless AfricaMay her spirit rise high upHear thou our prayersLord bless us.
  • Lord, bless AfricaBanish wars and strifeLord, bless our nationOf South Africa.

Nkosisikelel' iAfrikaMaluphakanyisw' uphondolwayo,Yizwaimithandazoyethu,Nkosisikelela, thinalusapholwayo.

Morenabolokasetjhabasaheso,O fedisedintwa le matshwenyeho,O se boloke, O se bolokesetjhabasaheso,Setjhabasa South Afrika – South Afrika.

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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What is implied by these words?

They express the hope that there will be change

for the better somewhere in the future

Metaphor

Though now few eyes

Can see beyond

Our tragic times complexities

The poet accuses the

majority of his countrymen

of not being able to envisage

the consequences of their

actions.

Further than

past

  • A time filled with tragedy and complicated and intricate problems.

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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The poet addresses God directly

Dear God ordain

Apostrophe

Order

Decree

Proclaim

Command

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

The word

suggests

a tone of

reverence

A close

bond with

God

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Such deeds be done

  • Such words be said
  • That men will praise
  • Your image yet

The tone of reverence

is sustained

treating one another

with kindness, consideration

and justice

Showing mutual respect and Christian charity

which will eventually lead to reconciliation.

Our actions and words

should reflect God’s image

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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This refers to deeds causing great fear,

death and destruction

Political and social frustration lead to

senseless violence and terror

When all these terrors

And hates are dead

There is a positive tone in these words

The words imply that there is hope and things will change

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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Allusion

Through rotting days

Beaten, broken,

Some stayed pure;

This word alludes to the proverb:

“To rot in jail”

Not only physically harassed and tortured

Alliteration

This is reinforced by the

But also mentally dispirited

Not many remained true

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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Some people became conditioned not

to react when they were treated badly

Just to accept it with patience

Others learnt how

To grin and endure

Allusion

This phrase alludes to the idiom:

“To grin and bear”

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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This line links with the word “some” in line 14

meaning scattered thinly

And here and there

A heart stayed warm

A head grew clear.

Even amidst the anguish and the madness there are still signs of human dignity and goodness

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH

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A head grew clear.

Somewhere somebody thought about

The situation with clarity

MADE BY RONEL MYBURGH