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Registered Apprenticeship Workforce Development Model Formalized Career Education Andrew Maciejewski, Executive Administ

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Registered Apprenticeship Workforce Development Model Formalized Career Education Andrew Maciejewski, Executive Administrator OSAC. Apprenticeship

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Registered ApprenticeshipWorkforce Development ModelFormalized Career EducationAndrew Maciejewski, Executive Administrator OSAC

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Apprenticeship

- training in an art, trade, or craft under a legal agreement that defines the duration and conditions of the relationship between master or journey level and apprentice or learner.

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Apprenticeship History
  • “Education for Work”, has its beginnings in about 2000 B.C. (organized apprenticeship) with the Scribes in Egypt.
  • Rules for governing apprenticeships were included in the Code of Hammurabi, in 2100 B.C.
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As the tools became more complex, the knowledge and skills became more specialized.
  • Parents and family members could no longer teach the next generational everything they needed to become a productive member of society.
    • Indentureship
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Children were apprenticed to a craftsman or artisan who obtained special skills and tools of a particular trade.
  • In exchange for work, the craftsman would teach and instruct the child in the particulars of the particular trades.
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Apprentices usually lived with their craftsman and did not receive pay, as they were learning a skill that was considered highly valuable.
  • This model of “Domestic Apprentices”, disappeared with the expansion of industry in the Industrial Revolution.
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Industrial revolution brought:
  • Compensation changed by employers to payments of wages.
  • Wages graduated to a predetermined scale, to journey level or craftsman level.
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Modern Apprenticeship
  • First formalized apprenticeship took shape in the United States dating back to 1911
  • In 1937 Congress passed the National Apprenticeship Law , also known as the Fitzgerald Act
    • Formalized regulation
    • State recognition
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Formalized Regulation
  • Define apprenticeable occupations
  • Process schedules
  • Training requirements
  • Safety
  • Wages
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State Recognition
  • Ohio received State Apprenticeship Council (SAC) status by the Department of Labor in 1957
    • Ohio
      • Laws and regulations
      • Promote and cultivate
        • Registered Apprenticeship
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Apprenticeable Occupations
  • The U.S. Department of Labor recognizes over 1000 occupations
  • Advanced Manufacturing
  • Aerospace
  • Automotive
  • Biotechnical
  • Constructions
  • Energy
  • Health Care
  • Hospitality
  • Information Technology
  • Transportation
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Criterion for Apprenticeable Occupations
  • Customarily learned in a practical way through structured supervised on-the-job training
  • Clearly identified and commonly recognized throughout an industry
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Criterion for Apprenticeable Occupations
  • Involved manual, mechanical, or technical skills and knowledge which requires a minimum of 2000 hours of on the job training
  • Requires related instruction to supplement the on the job training
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Registered Apprenticeship
  • The incorporation of two, equally as important, elements to develop the apprentices to journey level / craftsman status.

On the Job Training

Related Technical Instruction

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Core Elements of

Registered

Apprenticeship

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Related Technical Training
  • Technical coursework transfers to college credit and pathway toward degree
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On the Job Training

Related Technical Instruction

Completion Certificate

Certificate is a Nationally recognized portable credential and in some cases a college degree

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How does one get into a Registered Apprenticeship?
  • Indentureship / contractual agreements

“craft under a legal agreement that defines the duration and conditions of the relationship between master or journey level and apprentice or learner.”

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How does one get into a Registered Apprenticeship?
  • Sponsorship – organization that voluntarily registers their training program.
    • Meets state and federal regulations
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Sponsor Structure
  • Union / joint labor management committee - consortium of employers
  • Non-Union / joint labor management committee - consortium of employers
  • Union / individual
  • Non-Union / individual
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A sponsor of a program / occupation (s)
  • Individual makes application
  • Agreement between individual and sponsor, which is certified and approved by the State
    • Agreement
      • Occupation to be trained
      • Length
      • Wages
  • State ensures this agreement is upheld
  • Indentureship =
  • Sustainable wage / employment
  • Education
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Benefits of Registered Apprenticeship

For the Apprentice

  • Nationally-recognized portable credential
  • Sustainable wage and benefits
  • Career mapping
  • Increased marketable skill set and job security
  • Opportunity to have a paid education
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Benefits of Registered Apprenticeship for the Employer
  • Greater employee productivity
  • Improved quality
  • Greater employee retention
  • Enhanced employee recruitment
  • Systematic approach for skill upgrade
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Ohio’s Apprenticeship System
  • Currently 220 apprenticeable occupations in use
  • 1,100 current sponsors representing over 10,000 employers
  • 16,000 active apprentices
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Ohio’s Apprenticeship System
  • 3,700 new apprentices registered; annual average ($12.25 per hour)
  • 1,700 completion certificates issued, annual average ($22.60 per hour)
  • 83% completion rate state wide
    • 98% still employed in occupation at 6 months
    • 90% still employed in occupation at 1 year
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Review
  • Apprenticeship
    • Career and education
    • Employment and learning
    • Credentialed
    • Regulated
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