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Supporting the Distant Student the Effect of ARCS-Based Strategies on Confidence and Performance. Presenter: Che-Yu Lin Advisor: Ming-Puu Chen Date: 07/01/2009.

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supporting the distant student the effect of arcs based strategies on confidence and performance

Supporting the Distant Studentthe Effect of ARCS-Based Strategies onConfidence and Performance

Presenter: Che-Yu Lin

Advisor: Ming-Puu Chen

Date: 07/01/2009

Huett, J. B., Young, J., Huett, K.C., Moller, L., & Bray, M.(2008). Supporting the distant student the effect of ARCS-Based strategies on confidence and performance. The Quarterly Review of Distance Education, 9(2), 113–126.

introduction 1 2
Introduction(1/2)
  • An extensive review of the literature leads one to concur that there is a noted lack of research concerning the motivational needs of learners.
  • Keller (1999) noted that self-directed learning environments posed greater challenges to learner motivation than their face-to-face counterparts.
  • They noted that with the widespread use of computers in education, one could no longer depend on the “novelty effect” of technology to stimulate learner motivation.
  • Student-centered, independent learning requires a strong sense of motivation and confidence.
introduction 2 2
Introduction(2/2)
  • ARCS stands for Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction and serves as the framework for the confidence-enhancing tactics found in this study.
  • The ARCS model is an attempt to synthesize behavioral, cognitive, and affective learning theories and demonstrate that learner motivation can be influenced through external conditions such as instructional materials (Moller, 1993).
  • To better understand the role of confidence in the ARCS model, it helps to examine what Keller and Suzuki (1988) characterize as its three most important dimensions: perceived competence, perceived control, and expectancy for success.
method
Method
  • This study was conducted over a period ofapproximately 5-and-one-half weeks.
  • The purposesof this research were to:

-determine ifthere were statistically significant increases inconfidence levels of online learners using systematicallydesigned confidence tactics basedon Keller’s ARCS model.

-determine ifthe tactics also produced a statistically significantincrease or change in academic performance.

  • The subjects in this study were undergraduatestudents enrolled at a Texas universityrated Carnegie Doctoral/Research Universities—Extensive.
results 1 2
Results(1/2)

Results for the Confidence Subsection of the IMMS

results 2 2
Results(2/2)

Results for Posttest Measure

discussion
Discussion
  • Similar to Moller’s (1993) findings, there seem to be at least three potential explanations:

- The ARCS model is ineffective for improving learner confidence.

- The confidence tactics and methods used in this study were implemented improperly or were somehow inappropriate for these subjects.

- The differences in confidence were too small to measure or were immeasurable with the instrument (IMMS).